Transcript
of the May 23-25, 1927
Clinton County, Michigan Coroner's Inquest

into the circumstances surrounding the death of the Bath School Superintendent, Emory Eli Huyck, on May 18, 1927 in the Village of Bath, Michigan.
C.E. Lamb, Clinton County Coroner
Inquest conducted by William C. Searl, Clinton County Prosecuting Attorney



We have attempted to preserve the formatting of the original document. Obvious typographical errors have been corrected (corrections may be visually noted by a yellow background for the character or group of characters that have been added or modified).

Where the spelling of the name of an individual that appears in the transcript differs from the known correct spelling of their name the transcript's spelling is preserved. The obvious example: Superintendant Huyck's given name ... Emery (the transcipt's spelling) vs. Emory (the correct spelling).




 

STATE OF MICHIGAN

IN THE MATTER OF THE

INQUEST AS TO THE CAUSE

OF DEATH OF EMERY E. HUYCK,

Deceased.


)

)

)

)

)
(Explosion at the Bath Consolidated School, Bath, Michigan, and destruction of farm buildings at the farm of Andrew P. Kehoe, Bath Township, Clinton County, Michigan.)
 
 
 


Testimony in the above entitled matter taken upon the
hearing thereof, held at the Village of Bath, Clinton County, Michigan, beginning at 10:30 o'clock A. M., May 23rd, 1927.
BEFORE: C. E. Lamb, Coroner, and the following named Jury:
Edward DrumhellerIshmell Everett
Burt WilcoxWilmer Coleman
Clarence TolmanAlton Church
Scan of handwritten addition made to the typed transcript by court reporter Glenn Whitman
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(Glenn Whitman, Court Reporter)







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I  N  D  E  X
  N a m e P a g e 
Albert Detloff4
Frank Smith16
Lawrence Hart31
Floyd Huggett37
George L. Harrington47
Job T. Sleight, Jr.55
Melville W. Kyes68
Harry Barnard77
Leonard Hiatt81
Sidney J. Howell86
Robb Howell107
Alden Howell114
Mrs. Ann Rounds121
Lafayette Rounds126
Ward Kyes129
Monty Ellsworth133
Willitt C. Whitney141
Mrs. Charlotte Howell145
Mrs. La Hall Warner152
Herbert Fizzell157
Fred Krull161
Arthur Woodman163
Byron Robson167
Mrs. Lulu C. Hart170
David M. Hart179
Don Ewing189
David Watling193
D. B. Huffman195
Joseph Dunnebacke198
Charles V. Lane212
Cassie McFarren225



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I  N  D  E  X   (Continued)
  N a m e P a g e 
Wendell McFarren230
Mrs. Leone Smith232
Orville Knight236
Homer Jennison240
Tony Stavinski244
Mrs. Mable Ellsworth246
Henry Heiler248
Aaron DeBar250
Mrs. Virgaline Zeeb257
Miss Lodonna Rutter259
Mrs. Ida A. Hall262
Allen McMullen269
Jay Pope281
Everett Leonard285
O. B. Rounds287
George Hall293
Barton J. Fox296
0. H. Bush303
Jess Curtis308
Dart Lang312
John Sniveley316
Fordney Cushman320
Charles H. Rawson322
Lieut. Lyle W. Morse329
Jury Ruling348
Coroner's Ruling1



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ALBERT DETLOFF,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Detloff, you live here in Bath do you not?
A I do.
Q And how old a man are you?
A I am 45.
Q And what is your occupation?
A Blacksmith, general blacksmithing.
Q How long have you lived in Bath?
A The last time I lived in Bath over eighteen years going on nineteen years. I have lived in the community of Bath 31, 32 years this Fall.
Q And are you one of the members of the School Board?
A I am.
Q And how long have you been a member of the School Board?
A Two years in July.
Q Have you held any official position in the Board?
A Purchasing Agent.
Q Can you give us the names of the Board?
A The present members of the Board are George Morris, President; Mr. Kyes, Secretary; ---
Q Melvin Kyes?
A Yea, M. W. Kyes, Secretary; G. L. Spangler, Trustee; Enos Peacock, present Treasurer, and myself.
Q Now, on the 18th of May Andrew P. Kehoe was a member of the School Board?
A He was.
Q And he held an official position?
A He held as Treasurer.
Q And Mr. Peacock has been elected since then to take his place?
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A He has.
Q How long have you served on the School Board, did I ask?
A Yes, you asked. Two years this coming July.
Q How long have you known Andrew Kehoe?
A Personally came in contact with him since I have been on the School Board. I have worked with him for a long time blacksmithing, and I don't know just how long he has lived here, whether it is eight or ten years.
Q During the time you were on the School Board did you know of any friction between Mr. Kehoe and the School Board and any members of the Board?
A The last year there was a little friction, and before I came on there was quite a little friction I understand, but not in my presence.
Q Some of the other members of the Board would know more about that would they?
A Yes, sir.
Q And since you have been on the Board what has the trouble been about?
A High prices, expenses of the school. His main object was keeping Mr. Huyck out of the Board meetings. He didn't like to have him at the meetings.
Q Mr. Huyck is Superintendent?
A Yes, sir.
Q And his name is Emery E. Huyck?
A Yes, sir.
Q I understand Mr. Huyck attended your School Board Meetings and Mr.Kehoe didn't like that?
A Yes, sir.
Q And there was some friction between the two?
A Yes. Mr Huyck gave suggestions. He never tried to run the School Board but he gave suggestions, valuable instructions. I
(5)

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didn't consider he butted into the affairs.
Q Was there trouble between Kehoe and the other members of the School Board?
A Yes, There was between him and the Secretary.
Q Mr. Kyes?
A Yes.
Q What was the trouble?
A Just between the two of them.
Q Mr. Kyes was the Secretary and Mr. Kehoe, Treasurer?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did they have trouble about the books?
A No. They didn't have any trouble about the money, the books always balanced up.
Q Was there any open emnity between the two of them?
A There might have been a little grudge there, but otherwise they got along very nicely.
Q Huyck was a great advocate of the consolidated school?
A Yes.
Q And Mr. Kehoe was very much against it?
A Yes.
Q And there was some trouble in that direction?
A Yes, there was.
Q Do you know when Kehoe was elected upon the School Board?
A He was elected the second Monday -- I couldn't give you the date -- the second Monday in July, three years ago this July.
Q July, 1924?
A Yes.
Q And his term would expire in July this year, 1927?
A In July this year, yes.
Q On the morning of the 18th did you see Mr. Kehoe?
A I did.
Q What time in the morning did you see him?
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A I came in contact with him, talked with him personally as we were going to the school. Him and I went to the school. He took his watch out of his pocket --
Q Where did you meet him that morning?
A I went to George Hill's after some duck eggs, setting of duck eggs, and as I was driving through town, his machine set here by the postoffice, or very close to it, and I happened to think of our coming Board meeting, and I had forgotten the date, whether the 18th, 19th or 20th, so I stopped and asked him, and also spoke about our well being out of commission up to the schoolhouse, and we wasn't getting water enough. I got a little ahead of my story. I came up here and I backed down with my machine, and when I had backed down he came to my machine, and those were the questions I asked him, and he told me the 19th. He drove ahead of me to the schoolhouse, and when we stopped he said that meeting is the 20th and he said let's go in, so we went in.
Q You spoke about looking at your watch?
A Yes. Yes. On our way going to the schoolhouse, when we got to about the last tree, he took his watch out of his pocket and looked at it. It was 25 minutes after eight. I was 25 minutes after seven. In his conversation he said, "It is about time for school to begin", I said, "No, it isn't, we have got more than an hour. He hesitated a little and said "Yes, we have." I don't think there was more than a minutes difference in our watches, if there was that much. We went down in the pump house. He was behind me just a step or two. I opened up the pump house door.
Q That would be in the basement?
A Yes, in the basement. I looked in, and was just there a minute or two to look in, and he invited me in the other part.
Q What part is that?
A Where the generator is.
Q A little north and east of the pump house?
(7)

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A Yes. And as I came in there Mr. Smith was in there screwing hard oilers on his engine.
Q That is the generator?
A Yes. And I told him bout seeing Mr. Harrington to come down and fix the pump. Mr. Smith, the janitor, said "If I thought Mr. Harrington would be down here to fix this within a couple of hours, I wouldn't start this up." During this conversation I was having with Mr. Smith, Mr. Kehoe disappeared. Mr. Smith was to the right of me, and he stepped out when I was talking about the pump, he came away from screwing oilers, and he said "If I could see Mr. Harrington and knew about the time he would be here, why I wouldn't start this." And I said "Let's go out and see if we can see him." We came out, and while we was coming out Mr. Kehoe's machine had disappeared.
Q Did you see where it went?
A No. In fact we didn't look that way. We was looking across to Mr. Harrington's house. And that was the last I saw of Mr. Kehoe. I didn't see him from that time until I saw his body laying across the street.
Q Had you seen Harrington come to the school that morning?
A No, I didn't.
Q You left there first?
A Yes. I left there, left for the house.
Q And you went home?
A Yes.
Q Later in the day --
A Now, Prosecutor just a minute. I can't recall whether I went to the house. I can't really recall that.
Q Do you know whether Mr. Kehoe had a key to the school building or not?
A I believe he did have. I believe he did have. In fact I am positive. I think the Deputy Sheriff has one.
Q You had a key?
(8)

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A Yes, I had a key.
Q And you sometimes went to the school building as purchasing agent?
A Yes.
Q Did you ever loan your keys to Mr. Kehoe?
A I did when he was doing some repair work up there.
Q You were on the school Board last summer?
A Yes.
Q Did Kehoe do some work around there last summer?
A Yes.
Q When was that?
A It was sometime in the summer, during the vacation. Probably July, June or July, and he might have did some in August.
Q Do you know what work he did?
A He wired up our generator. He helped also to line up the engine. He did some tiling and minor repairs in and around the schoolhouse.
Q This tiling that he did, when did he do that?
A He didn't finish that until after school begun.
Q Would that be about in August or September?
A In September, because the children use to jump down in the trench, I remember that.
Q When he was doing that tiling was there some cement joints?
A Yes. There was two string of tiles, one is a drain from the schoolhouse, takes the overflow out of the septic tank, flows to the west. These joints are all cemented to keep the roots from going down in the tile, because our drain plugged and we had to pull them up. His suggestion was to cement all the joints where the trees get through, or where the roots get into the tile.
Q He was working around there last summer with cement?
A Yes.
Q Do you know whether he took cement to the school himself, or whether somebody else took it?
A I couldn't say, but I imagine he took it himself, and he done his own tiling.
(9)

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Q You never saw a bill go to you for the purchase of those supplies?
A I did for the tile.
Q And you say he took them there himself?
A He did, yes.
Q About this wiring that was done around there. When was that done, do you know?
A No, I couldn't tell you exactly. It might have been in July, and it might have been in August. It was while we were putting in our engines.
Q You had two engines there?
A Yes. A Delco, and a Fairbanks-Morse.
Q This wiring was done so you could use both of these engines if one broke down?
A That was done by Barker-Fowler Co.
Q Kehoe didn't' do that?
A No, he just fixed the one for the large generator.
Q In doing that wiring would he have to go under the flooring?
A No.
Q That wiring was all around the pump house, and in and around there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you ever see him around the schoolhouse working there last summer?
A Oh, yes. A number of times.
Q In the daytime?
A Yes.
Q Was his car around there?
A Yes.
Q He owns an automobile?
A A Ford light truck.
Q That is what we ordinarily call a Ford pick-up?
A Yes.
Q With a small detachable body on the rear?
A Yes.
(10)

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Q You have seen that car so you could identify it?
A I could at one time.
Q This morning of the explosion where were you, did you hear the explosion?
A I did.
Q Where were you at that time?
A There in the shop.
Q Your shop is down on the west side of the street?
A Yes.
Q About how far from the schoolhouse is that?
A I don't know, but about a third of a mile by the speedometer.
Q You are at the extreme north of the business district?
A Yes.
Q And the schoolhouse is south of the business district?
A Yes.
Q What did you do when you heard this explosion?
A Mr. Dutton was down stairs fixing a machine. He had a hoist hitched to the joist, and when that explosion took place I was there alone, and I said what is going on, and I run down stairs and I thought the hoist gave way and the machine dropped, and I said "What is going on down here", and I don't remember whether there was anybody in the building. I came out of the front part of the shop and looked out, and I came right around to the stairs, and as I came out on the walk somebody was hollering "The schoolhouse is blowed up," and I started up the walk, and when I got to the drug store. That morning before I went to work my girl said she had to be out before 10:30.
Q You went to the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q What did you see when you went there?
A I saw the north wing all demolished.
Q That schoolhouse was built in the shape of a 'T'?
A It was.
(11)

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Q And this north wing you speak of would be how large?
A Sixty feet, eighty feet long. I couldn't say just how far, and probably forty, sixty feet wide.
Q And you saw that some of the walls had caved in and the roof was down?
A They was.
Q Did you see Kehoe around there at that time?
A No, I didn't.
Q Or his car?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A Yes, I did.
Q Where did you see him?
A At the telephone office.
Q As you came down?
A No, when I came back. I had went to the schoolhouse and got my daughter and dressed a wound, she got a wound in her ankle. I hurried right back and went to the telephone office, and Mr. Huyck was there.
Q Did you talk with him?
A He said "Bert there is no use calling anybody, I have done all that can be done, I have called the State Department and the State Police, and there is no help that you can get, it is all done." I said "All right, I will go and get a private doctor for my girl." I hunted for Dr. Foster.
Q Did you go back to the school?
A I did.
Q What did you find when you got back?
A I went to the home economics room to see if --
Q Where is the home economics room?
A In the old part on the north side.
Q That would be in the central part?
A In the old building, in the central part.
Q To the back of the schoolhouse?
(12)

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A To the north of the schoolhouse, and back as well.
Q What did you see around there?
A I saw ruins. Mr. Everett Leonard and myself was in there at the time of the second explosion,
Q Where were you when this took place?
A I was in the schoolhouse in the home economics room.
Q And did that take place shortly after you got back?
A Yes, shortly after I got back.
Q Who was with you you say, Everett Leonard?
A Everett Leonard.
Q What time was it when you heard the first explosion, have you any idea?
A I dare say, railroad time it was 8:45. As I was coming up the walk I took my watch out, and the girl told me she would be out at 10:30, I took my watch out by the drug store, and it was 5 minutes to nine by the watch. I was going to the school after the explosion.
Q Do you think that was ten minutes after the explosion?
A It couldn't have been, because I had come right straight down from the shop and started up the street.
Q How long do you think it was after that that this second explosion went up?
A Well, I should judge twenty minutes. It might have been half hour, and it might not have been but ten minutes, I couldn't state, because I had taken my girl home dressed her wound, came back and called a doctor, and went back in the schoolhouse.
Q At that time you didn't see Huyck out in front?
A No.
Q How long do you think you had been in the schoolhouse before this explosion went off?
A I don't think I had been in there more than three minutes before this occurred. I had just got in and went into the manual training and back out.
(13)

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Q Where did you go after the second explosion?
A I run around the north side to the front, right in front Of the ruins.
Q What did you see when you got out in front?
A The first thing I saw was Perry Hart on his hands and knees. That is the boy that is in the hospital. He was on his hands and knees. I went to the front side of the schoolhouse, and as I went to the front side of the schoolhouse somebody said Mr. Huyck is killed, and I said no, and they said Glenn Smith is laying over there. I went up on the road walk, and I came in contact with Mrs. Hall, and she said "Mr. Detloff, Mr. Huyck is killed", and as I remember I had a view of the body to make sure when I saw her.
Q And you identified Mr. Huyck?
A I identified him by his coat. He had a checkered coat on.
Q You are sure the body there was Mr. Huyck?
A Yes. I was positive of the coat.
Q Then did you see Glenn Smith there?
A Just glanced at him. I didn't stop to inquire or anything, just glanced at him.
Q Was he alive?
A Yes, I believe he was. Walking back and forth I had saw his wife hold him up.
Q Did you see Nelson McFarren?
A Yes.
Q Was he alive?
A He was dead, laying against the tree.
Q You identified him?
A No.
Q Did you see Mrs. Perronia?
A No, she was coming from our house.
Q What is her first name?
A Anna Perronia.
(14)

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Q She had been to your home?
A Yes.
Q And was on her way home when this happened?
A Yes.
Q But you didn't see her after that?
A No.
Q Did you see any others?
A Out there on the walk?
Q Yes?
A I saw a number of them.
Q You didn't see Mr. Kehoe at that time?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see the body that was afterwards called Mr. Kehoe's body?
A I did.
Q. And could you identify it as Mr. Kahoe's body?
A I believe I could. I just saw the head and face.
Q Did you see the machine that was called Mr. Kehoe's machine?
A Yes, identified the wheels, and the way I had of identifying it, he had a hub-meter on the left front wheel.
Q From that you would identify it as Kehoe's machine?
A Yes. I couldn't tell you the make of it, and there isn't very many with hub-meters on.
Q After that what did you do, after you went out in front and saw these bodies out there?
A I couldn't tell you what I did do?
Q You don't remember?
A. No. No. I was doing everything I thought was serviceable. In fact, I went around identifying bodies. I identified those they took out of the schoolhouse, I was busy around there. I wasn't around the ruins, I mean I was around the ruins, I was helping take them out. I helped with Miss Matteson. One of the linemen carried Miss Matteson out of the ruins, and I said "Do you want some help",
(15)

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and he said "Take her across the road to Mr. Smith's house", and I took her across the road to Mr. Smith's house and laid her on the bed.
Q Did you ever do any work for Mr. Kehoe in the blacksmith line?
A Not lately. I haven't been down for over a year, and that was on his tractor.
Q Did he have any car outside from this Ford?
A Not to my knowledge.
Q Did you ever see him drive any other except this Ford?
A No, I never did.
Q Do you think of anything else that I haven't asked you?
A I do not. No, sir.
MR SEARL: If you gentlemen of the Jury have anything you want to ask, you may do so.

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FRANK SMITH,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Smith, you are the janitor at the school are you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q How old a man are you?
A Fifty-one.
Q And are you a brother of Glenn Smith?
A Yes, sir.
Q He was the postmaster?
A Yes, sir.
Q How old was Glenn?
A Thirty-three that day.
Q He was married wasn't he?
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A Yes, sir.
Q Did he have any children?
A Not living.
Q How long had you been janitor to the school?
A Eight months.
Q You live here in Bath do you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q And where is your home situated in reference to the school?
A Right across the street.
Q And yours is the yellow house across tho street?
A Yes, sir.
Q And a little bit to the north?
A Yes, sir.
Q What is your wife's name, Mr. Smith?
A Leone.
Q She lives there with you in that home?
A Yes, sir.
Q You have been janitor there about eight months?
A About eight months.
Q Who was janitor before that?
A I couldn't say who the felow was.
Q What time would you go to work normally in the morning?
A Six o'clock, sometimes a little later, and I don't know but on occasions may be a little bit before.
Q How late did you work at night?
A Not later than six at the ordinary work.
Q Did you go back in the evening?
A Just when there was teachers' meetings, or something of that kind.
Q You are speaking of slow time, railroad time?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were you ever around the building in the night time?
A Never was around it.
(17)

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Q Unless there was a meeting there?
A Not unless there was a meeting there.
Q Did you ever notice there had been anybody around there in the night time, anything to indicate that?
A No, I don't believe I ever did,
Q You never saw any lights over there in the night?
A No.
Q You never saw any automobiles come up there and park there?
A Might have been on the street, but not up to the schoolhouse.
Q You never saw any back up to the schoolhouse?
A No, I never did.
Q Can you tell the Jury how this schoolhouse is built? In the first place, it is built in the form of a 'T'?
A Yes.
Q The main building was the old Bath school?
A The main building was the smaller part. The new part was the long part that runs north and south in front. The main part came up and fixed the 'T' on the east. The front part, or new part wasn't ever excavated underneath. It was perhaps three feet between the floor and the ground.
Q So that the entire new part, new structure that was built at the time the consolidation was formed never had any basement under it?
A Never had any basement under it.
Q The only basement was about three feet where the wall was built up?
A Yes.
Q The entire basement was under the old school building?
A I think it was. I think it is.
Q That gave you quite a small basement?
A There is quite a large basement, but I am sure it in just under the old school.
Q There was a main entrance in front?
A To the building, yes.
(18)

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Q And just one main entrance, with double doors?
A Yes.
Q And two entrance beyond the front entrance?
A One on each end. Single door at each end.
Q Now, you could go down cellar from both of these doors or not?
A No. You came from the north end you had to go through the main corridor there clear to the south end before you could enter the basement.
Q But from the south door you could enter the basement immediately could you?
A Yes.
Q About how long was this building, do you know?
A Why, no. I could make a guess is about all I could do. I never even thought how long it might be.
Q I guess we can get it a little later. Now, when you went in this back door, this south door you speak of, the pump room is off to the right in the cellar?
A Yes, the first thing is the pump room.
Q That is quite a small room?
A Yes, about 6 x 8.
Q You have a small motor?
A A small motor, and the pump, and this delco plant is there also.
Q That room doesn't connect with anything except the corridor?
A That is all, except the window that goes with that, with the engine room.
Q And as you go out of that room where would you go?
A You go into this hall leaking along into the engine room, There is a hall perhaps 14 feet long from the time you get to the bottom of the stairs before you get to the engine room, but the pump room is right at the foot of the stairs.
Q Then you would have to turn off to the right to got into this engine room?
(19)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Is there any room to the north there?
A The room extends to the north perhaps 30 feet from this door where you enter.
Q What do you use that room for?
A Sort of a stock room where they keep lumber and equipment.
Q Then east of this engine room is there a room?
A Yes, the furnace room.
Q There isn't any room east of the furnace room?
A No, but to the north of the furnace room is the fan room.
Q What is that?
A That is the fan that distributes the air through the building, with a motor in there.
Q Is there any room east of the fan room?
A Just where they keep the coal.
Q That takes up the entire basement we have named?
A Yes.
Q From this hall in front there is some trap doors about 18 inches square?
A Not from the hall, but from the basement proper.
Q Where is it located?
A One is located just as you enter the engine room on the west side, and the other you have to go into the fan room to got to it.
Q Didn't you find some of those doors out of place on one or two occasions?
A Yes, I have in the fan room.
Q In the fan room?
A In the fan room.
Q When was the first time you noticed that?
A I don't know. I have been trying to recall who was with me, because I drew their attention. I had put this door in, and it was out, and that was the second or third time I put it in. I can't
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recall, but I kind of think it was Mr. Huyck.
Q About how long ago was that?
A I am not sure but the last time was when Mr. Brya was over from Laingsburg, was over looking the motors over.
Q Somebody was there?
A Yes, and I called their attention to it.
Q About how long ago was it?
A It doesn't seem to me it was very long ago, not more than a week ago.
Q You mean a week from now, or from the explosion?
A From the explosion.
Q You mean sometime the week before the explosion?
A It seems like that.
Q How long before that had you found it open?
A Perhaps a week before that.
Q How long ago do you think it was when you first found that open?
A I don't know, but not very long ago. It seems to me I put it in three times, but I am not sure. It might not have been more than two times.
Q Did you ever have occasion to take the door out to go in there yourself?
A Not that door, but the other door. Mr. Huyck held a light and I went in there to look for a leak.
Q When was that?
A Seven or eight months ago, when I first went there.
Q Early in the Fall?
A Yes.
Q When you went in there looking for the leak in the water pipe did you go clear to the front?
A No. I just followed that pipe along, and he held a flashlight and I could see that pipe as far as I wanted to see it, then I came back.
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Q Was the pipe leaking?
A No.
Q You didn't have to repair it at all?
A No.
Q You didn't go up in front of the building then?
A No.
Q Did you notice any wiring at that time?
A No, sir.
Q Did you notice whether it looked like anybody had been in there?
A I didn't notice it.
Q Did you ever go into this other part from the fan room?
A No, I don't think I was ever in there.
Q This wvater pipe that you speak of -- Did you ever have a leak in a steam pipe?
A Not in under there.
Q Did you ever in the basement of the school look for a steam leak in the basement?
A No. I did up above.
Q Where, was the water leaking?
A It was.
Q I don't care to go into it in detail. Was it anything you would have to go in under the floors?
A No. It was in the toilet. The pressure was low.
Q So, as long as you have been janitor that was the only time that you have been up in under this part that didn't have a basement in under it?
A I believe it is. Yes.
Q Now, this morning of the 18th, what time did you get to the school?
A Was that the morning of the explosion?
Q Yes?
A I couldn't say for sure, but I imagine about six o'clock. That was the time I figured on going over there unless I am firing. But this time about six o'clock.
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Q Did Kehoe do some work around there last Fall after school started?
A Not after I was there he didn't, but I think may be before started.
Q Was you there when school started?
A No.
Q What time of the year did you start in the school year?
A In the second month.
Q That would be in October?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did Barker-Fowler do this wiring after you went there?
A Yes.
Q Did Kehoe do any wiring then?
A No, I don't think he was in there. I remember him going in there once and going over it, looking it over; that is, going over it in a fast, quick way as though looking it over.
Q So when you got there he had got this tiling all done, and that work?
A Yes, sir.
Q This morning of the 18th when you first came there did you see -- I waive that. Sometime that morning did you see Mr. Kehoe around in the building?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did you see Mr. Detloff there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you had had some conversation with Detloff before this about the pump needing some repairs?
A Yes.
Q Was that that same morning?
A No, not that same morning. I told him before. He was going to get a man as soon as he could, but not that morning.
Q That morning Kehoe and Detloff came there to the building?
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A Yes, sir.
Q You had some conversation?
A Only Mr. Detloff and I. He said I am in a desperate hurry.
Q Did you hear them come in together?
A NO. I heard them talking together in the pump room.
Q Where was you, in the engine room?
A I was in the engine room.
Q And they were in the pump room?
A Yes.
Q And you heard a conversation between them?
A Yes, something about pullingg thst pipe.
Q Did Kehoe come in where you were, or you go in where they were?
A They both came in there.
Q Tell me again what Kehoe said?
A If I remember right, he says "You know, I am in an awful hurry", and that was about all he said, and whirled and went out, and he seemed to be dressed pretty good, and I suppose you don't care for that.
Q You didn't see him again until after the explosion?
A I never saw him again.
Q You did have an electric system, a separate electric system in the school for operating the lights and pump?
A A separate --
Q I mean you weren't connected up with the City or anything like that?
A No. No. It was an individual direct plant they had there.
Q And you had engines to operate that?
A Yes.
Q Fairbanks-Morse and a Delco. Now was that connected up with the bell system for a class bell?
A In fact I don't know how that was operated.
Q Mr. Huggett would know more about that than you do?
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A Yes, sir.
Q Did you start up the motor that morning?
A No.
Q The engine wasn't started, and you didn't have any electricity that morning?
A Not that morning.
Q After Mr. Detloff and Mr. Kehoe left what did you do?
A I went over to Mr. Harrington's house to see if he was coming right over.
Q Mr. Harrington is a plumber?
A Yes.
Q Had you made any arrangements with him about coming over?
A Mr. Detloff had. As I came away from his place, I saw him driving in the school yard with his tools.
Q Mr, Harrington lives near you?
A Yes. Just a little back and a little south.
Q 'When you got over there did you and Mr. Harrington go down to the pump house?
A Not directly. Mr. Harrington was down there later, and I saw him and I said I didn't think we ought to start that job until after the last bell because of the children around where we had to pull this pipe, and he said he thought that was a good scheme, so he kind of hung around until after 8:30.
Q One of the doors to the school in back was jammed so it wouldn't lock?
A It was split so you couldn't close it.
Q And about how long ago did that get split?
A Well, it might have been four to six weeks ago, something like that. It has been a few weeks ago. It might have been six weeks ago.
Q Do you know how it got split?
A No, I don't.
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Q You locked up the schoolhouse each night?
A Yes.
Q And you locked the doors?
A Yes. These doors were so when you were inside you could got out.
Q Was it in the night or morning that you saw the door split?
A At Night. The door wasn't locked in the day time, and I couldn't got it locked at night.
Q From that time it was never locked?
A It never was locked.
Q So anybody could get in the school building from that door?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you understand that Kehoe also had a key to the building?
A I don't know. It was always my idea that he had a key to the building, but I didn't see it.
Q Did you know this front door jammed so it wouldn't lock?
A I know we had trouble with it, but we always got it locked.
Q Was your attention called to the fact that somebody had apparently pried at the door to get in?
A No.
Q The door would jam some?
A Yes, it would jam.
Q How long ago was that?
A It got to jamming about three weeks ago.
Q Along about the 1st of May?
A I imagine it was about three weeks ago the bracket was taken off the shock absorber and taken to Lansing.
Q He was the man that you always called upon to fix anything at the schoolhouse?
A Generally, in a mechanical line he generally took care of that.
Q He was a good mechanic?
A I understand, although he never did anything of that kind around there. Any job like that he always took to Lansing.
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Q This morning you and Mr. Harrington were in the pump house you went to work at 8:30?
A Perhaps 8:45.
Q Was anybody else working with you there?
A No, sir.
Q How long did you work?
A Well, may be, perhaps ten minutes, may be fifteen.
Q And was that where you were when the explosion took place?
A Yes, sir.
Q You were both down there?
A Both down there.
Q So you think that took place about 8:45 or so?
A It seems to me it must have from whet we had done, and the time it took to get down there, I imagine about 8:45.
Q What did you do when you first heard this explosion?
A I --
Q What did you notice?
A I ran up the stairs as soon as I got straightened around, because it throwed me against the wall. I don't remember going down, but may be I did. And I ran up stairs to the hall and begin getting the children out through this south door.
Q This end?
A The south door.
Q That would be the kindergarten and first grade?
A The first and second, both.
Q And those children were all at the south end?
A At the south end.
Q I don't suppose you saw Harrington after that in the excitement there?
A I think I noticed Harrington holding the door open when I was herding these little fellows.
Q That was the door that was split they were taking them out?
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A No. It was the door at the north end that was split.
Q Then what did you do after that?
A Then I went around the building and began to digging for those in the other end.
Q That would be the north end?
A Yes, sir.
Q You got some of the children out?
A I don't remember getting any out. I was prying with a pry to get up the roof, and Lawrence Hart spoke about getting a telephone pole.
Q Where did you go to get the telephone pole?
A Up to Thomas Lowe's corners.
Q How far would that be from the schoolhouse?
A Why, I don't know. It would be three blocks. It would be, I should think, in the neighborhood of 80 rods from the schoolhouse.
Q Did somebody go with you?
A Lawrence Hart.
Q He went with you?
A Yes, sir, and took an automobile.
Q And took an automobile and went?
A Yes.
Q Did you get a telephone pole?
A Yes, sir.
Q And came back with it?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you came to the school yard where did you come in?
A On the southwest bank.
Q Did you drive across the sidewalk?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you drive across the school sidewalk?
A No. We kept on the south side. Four or five follows came along and took hold, and I took hold and Lawrence, and then I heard
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the other shot on the street.
Q Have you any idea how long it was between the first shot and the second shot you heard in the street?
A It must have been quite a little over half hour it seems to me.
Q You think it took you half an hour to do what you did?
A I had been there getting the first and second grade out, and then I went and got a chain up to Mr. Hart's house, and then Lawrence and I went up there and we had quite a little trouble getting that telephone pole back and dragging it back, and quite a little while getting it round the automobiles.
Q When you got back with this telephone pole did you see Mr. Huyck there -- the Superintendent?
A No.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith?
A Yes. He helped with the pole.
Q He was out in front then?
A Yes.
Q He didn't follow you around the schoolhouse?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. McFarren?
A I didn't notice him.
Q Did you see your brother at any time after this explosion?
A No.
Q After this explosion did you go out in the street there?
A As quick as I could got my eyes open I looked around where I thought it sounded, and I looked up. First, I thought they was shelling us from above, and I looked out there, I saw him lying out in front, and I dropped the pole and ran out there.
Q Did you hear shells?
A Nothing only that one explosion.
Q Did you hear anything like bullets flying?
A No.
Q Or like bullets going through the trees?
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A I didn't notice it.
Q Did you afterwards find any bullets around there?
A No, I didn't.
Q And when you went out there did you go to your brother first?
A Yes.
Q How was your brother injured?
A He was the only one alive. His leg was cut off here (indicating).
Q His left leg?
A Yes. And his side was all blackened as though shocked inside, and it was his left hand was pretty well chewed up, seemed like the back was off like.
Q Was his right leg injured too?
A I think there was a wound in his right leg, but that was smaller.
Q Did you have some talk with him there?
A Yes, he talked all the time.
Q What did he say to you?
A He kept repeating to us, said not to feel bad if he went. He says "I don't want anybody to feel bad if I go." He said when I first got to him, "I have been hit, it is all up with me."
Q Did he make any mention about Kehoe?
A I never heard him mention Kehoe's name, and I and my wife were both there.
Q Did he say anything about Huyck being there?
A It seems to me his wife says "Huyck is over there."
Q Did he make any explanation as to how it happened?
A No, he didn't. I don't think he knew.
Q You went into Lansing to the hospital with him?
A I followed him in.
Q You didn't go in with the ambulance?
A I didn't.
Q How long did he live after he got to the hospital?
A He died just as I got there.
Q And then you came back out here to the school after that?
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A Well, as quick as we could make arrangements there, I and his wife.
Q The situation at the schoolhouse had been pretty well cleaned up when you got back to the schoolhouse?
A It had. I understand the bodies had all been taken out.
Q Do you know anything more about this that I haven't asked you about?
A I don't. I can't think of a thing that would be of any consequences.
MR. SEARL: Do you think of anything, Gentlemen, that you want to ask him?

-----oooOOOooo-----

LAWRENCE HART,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your name is Lawrence Hart?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where do you live?
A Two miles north and east of Bath.
Q And how old a man are you?
A I am 26 now, 27 in June.
Q Are you married?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you have any children in this school here?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you know Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q And how long have you know him?
A Well, I don't know, I can't remember where I first met the man, but I have known him for quite a number of years, four or five years I imagine.
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Q And where were you on Wednesday morning, the morning of this explosion?
A At the time of the explosion you mean?
Q Yes?
A I was at the elevator with a load of wheat.
Q You had just driven in there?
A I imagine I had been there about half hour.
Q That morning before the explosion did you see Mr. Kehoe any place?
A No, I didn't.
Q What did you do after the explosion took place?
A About the first thing, I was wondering what it was, I remember I looked across the street and saw the Consumers Power fellows sliding down the poles.
Q You saw them running toward the school?
A Yes, and we followed.
Q And who was with you?
A I believe Tolman started with me, didn't you? We started and I know after I got as far as the drug store I was alone from then on up.
Q And what did you see when you first got up there? You have heard it described here, how the roof was down?
A Yes. The north wing had collapsed when I first appeared on the scene.
Q Were there very many people there when you first got there?
A Yes, there was quite a number of people that lived close.
Q What did you do when you first got there?
A the first thing I done was run to the end of the building and started to help. I asked if the children were in there, and they said they were, and I started to tear things away so they could get to them.
Q You helped carry the children out?
A I carried one or two across the street.
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Q To Frank Smith's house?
A Yes.
Q Do you remember going after a telephone pole with Frank Smith?
A Yes. My father-in-law said if we only had a pole so we could pry that roof up. There were some little folks underneath the roof at that time, and I started for a pole, and as I started out towards the road I met Frank Smith, and I said "Let's get a telephone pole."
Q Who is your father-in-law?
A Jay Pope.
Q Did Pope go with you?
A No. he didn't. Just Smith and I.
Q Did you take your car?
A No. I started up the street, and my truck was at the elevator, and I didn't know where we could get a car. There were lots of them there and I didn't imagine we could got them, and I met Mrs. Huyck, and I asked her if her car was home and she said no it is in front of the schoolhouse, and she said Mr. Huyck had the keys, and I said maybe I can start it with my jackknife, and I did.
Q What kind of car was that, a Ford?
A Four door sedan.
Q The place where you went after this telephone pole was about three blocks or so?
A Up at Lowe's corner. I imagine three blocks at least.
Q And when you came back with it, Mr. Smith described how you came across the school yard, that is true?
A Yes.
Q At that time did you see Mr. Huyck?
A I saw some men standing there. I was so excited I didn't know who they were. I remember seeing Glenn Smith there. He helped get it around a car there, and Frank Smith said "Wait a minute", and I looked back through the back glass and I saw Glenn Smith throw the telephone pole and come away from the wall.
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Q Was he at that time on the west side of the street?
A Who, Glenn Smith?
Q Yes.
A No. He was on the east side of the street.
Q And this car was on the east side of the street?
A Yes.
Q Do you think you saw Huyck?
A No, I don't remember seeing Mr. Huyck.
Q Where was this crowd of people that you saw on the street there?
A They weren't crowded, just one or two scattered and standing around there.
Q Did you see Kehoe at that time?
A I might of. I remember there was a Ford car drawing up behind when we drove in there with the telephone pole.
Q And do you think that was Kehoe's car?
A I don't know. I thought at the time it was somebody helping. I didn't notice anybody in the car in particular.
Q Did you go up to the building with the pole with Frank Smith?
A We didn't get to the building with it.
Q How close were you to the building?
A I drove an near as I dare, and I got out and unhooked the chain, and there was just Frank Smith and I at the telephone pole at that time, and I called for help, and I called Charley Havelin and the oil man to help us, and I just got hold of the telephone pole and just dragged it ten or twelve feet when the second explosion came.
Q Did that knock you down?
A I believe it did.
Q Did you walk out from the school?
A Yes. I walked out kind of kitter-corner to the sidewalk.
Q Did you see the superintendent, Mr. Huyck, there?
A No. I didn't.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith?
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A He was the first man I saw after it came to me what had happened. The first time I looked he was there, and the second time he appeared on the street, and he rolled down the embankment, rolled twice.
Q Where was this embankment?
A On the east side of the schoolhouse.
Q Did you hear any shells exploding there?
A No, just the one explosion is all I heard.
Q Did you hear anything like bullets flying?
A No.
q Did you see this body that was said to be Kehoe's?
A No, I didn't. In fact I didn't go close to any of those men after the explosion.
Q Where did you go, back to the school?
A No. The first thing I knew I was down to the elevator. I don't know how I got there.
Q You just had a lapse of memory?
A Yes.I remember seeing Glenn Smith, and I don't remember anything until I got to the elevator and I started back.
Q Then you went back up to the school?
A Yes.
Q And assisted in taking out the children?
A No. I couldn't do anything. I sat around there sort of dazed until they got my sister-in-law.
Q You had a sister-in-law in there?
A Yes. I recognized her.
Q What was your sister-in-law's name?
A Blanche Hart.
Q You are a brother of Ross Hart?
A Yes, sir.
Q She was alive when they got her out?
A Yes, sir.
Q But she died later in the hospital?
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A She died the next day?
Q Thursday?
A About noon.
Q Do you know anything else about this that I haven't asked you about?
A Not to amount to anything, only just little occurrences, and I don't recall any of them to memory just now.
A JUROR: Has anybody heard any explosions except the two that has been spoken of?
A I heard three different explosions out to Kehoe's.
Q When did that occur with reference to this?
A This explosion was the first I heard and as I drove in the school yard somebody said "Kehoe's buildings are on fire", and I remember looking, and at that time I saw an explosion down there, and the explosion was in the house, and I don't know as I looked back. I went right to the schoolhouse from the sidewalk.
You didn't hear any explosion down at Kehoe's when you were down at the elevator before?
A No.
Q Nor notice any fire down there?
A No.
Q When you came back from the elevator the second time, or at any time, did you see Kehoe?
A No. No.
MR. SEARL: Any more questions?

-----oooOOOooo-----





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FLOYD HUGGETT,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your full name, Mr. Huggett?
A Floyd Huggett.
Q And how old are you?
A Twenty-six.
Q And you were the Principal of the school here were you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where is your home?
A Bellvue.
Q That is Bellvue, Michigan?
A Yes, sir, Eaton County.
Q How long have you been teaching here?
A Four years.
Q Do you know how long Mr. Huyck had been Superintendent here?
A I believe five years. He came one year before I did.
Q And, of course, during all the time you were here you knew Mr. Huyck very well?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where was Mr. Huyck's office in the building? Did he have an office there?
A Yes, sir. In the front part, to the north side. Well, there was one room between his office and the north end of the front part.
Q That would be a class room?
A A class room that seated about 25.
Q You have noticed the building since this explosion of course. Are the windows in his room still standing, or are they down?
A Oh, no. His office was in about the central part of the wreckage.
Q And did you have an office in there?
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A  « response missing from original copy of the transcript » 
Q You had charge of an assembly room?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where is that assembly room located?
A That is in the east part that is standing, upstairs.
Q To the north?
A No. In the inner east part, on the upper floor on the inner east side.
Q Now, in this part that was blown down downstairs, what grades were in there, do you know?
A The Third, Fourth and Fifth.
Q Were there three room?
A Two rooms.
Q So that the Third and Fourth were on the east side at the north?
A Yes, sir.
Q And the Fifth Grade on the west side to the north?
A In the corner at the west side, and the Sixth Grade directly above.
Q Above the Fifth Grade?
A Yes, sir.
Q And was Mr. Huyck's office up above the Third and Fourth Grades?
A Yes, the north part of their room.
Q What was on the east side there?
A East of the Sixth Grade there was nothing. That was the wing there, and the hallway runs along the east side of the building.
Q Was that all the grades that were in there?
A The only other room, there was a small room on the east landing, and that was used as a first aid room.
Q The Kindergarten, and the First and Second Grades were in the north wing downstairs?
A Yes, sir.
Q What was in the south wing?
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A Chemistry and Physics Laboratory and class room, and the high-school library in connection with the laboratory.
Q Then the high-school would be in the main part to the east?
A To the east. Yes, sir.
Q Can you explain to the Jury the system you had of ringing class bells?
A We had two systems. Class bells were rung from a button back of my desk. When the generator was running downstairs they were connected directly with the lighting circuit that furnished our lights. If anything happened that the motor wasn't running, they had to step out and ring a gong that was attached to a chain in the hall.
Q And on this morning of the 18th the generator wasn't running?
A No, Sir.
Q So you used the gong?
A I used the hand gong.
Q It didn't ring with any batteries, you had to pull the chain?
A Yes, Simply pull on the chain. One pull on the chain rung the gong once.
Q Did you know of any batteries that were there in the building except the ones in the physics laboratory?
A None. I never saw any there except those.
Q Did you see the dry cells?
A No.
Q Can you give the teacher's names that were in charge?
A The Third and Fourth was in charge of Miss Wetherby.
Q That is Hazel Wetherby?
A Hazel Wetherby. The Fifth Grade Miss Blanche Hart and Miss Eva Gibbens.
Q And who had charge of the Kindergarten and First Grade?
A Miss Bernice Sterling First Grade, and Miss Leona Gutekunst.
Q What did Miss Matteson teach?
A Latin and English in the High-school.
Q This morning of the 18th, do you know about what time it was that
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you came to the school?
A In the neighborhood of 25 minutes to eight railroad time. We were due there at fifteen to eight, and I was early, but I don't know just how many minutes.
Q Were there any other teachers in the school when you got there?
A Not to my knowledge.
Q Did you see the janitor that morning -- Mr. Smith?
A Notuntil about 8:20.
Q Did school call on time that morning?
A It did.
Q And your regular time of calling is 8:30?
A 8:30.
Q What did you do immediately after school called?
A I left the assembly and went down to the office and left some papers, came out and went out the side door to the south, and stopped over into the Methodist Church to practice Seniors for graduation.
Q The Methodist Church is just to the south?
A Yes, just a few steps.
Q When you went over did some girls go with you?
A They Went before?
Q Who were they?
A Two Seniors, Bertha Kumm and Thelma Kressman.
Q This morning in school some of the students were absent?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was there reasons for that?
A We were running final examinations upstairs and they had to be there only to hold their examinations, and some were scheduled for ten o'clock, and the seniors had written the week before and the seniors were to report at one o'clock that day.
Q And the lower grades were there?
A As far as I know.
Q And your graduation was next day, the 19th?
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A Yes, sir.
Q And your school expected to close that week?
A The final closing would have been today.
Q Monday, the 23rd?
A Yes, sir, All our reports were dated the 23rd.
Q Now, when you went over to the church you went over to hear these two girls recite, practice some for graduation?
A Yes, sir.
Q And how long were you in the church?
A The first girl had a poem, and she had given that poem which consisted of only three stanzas, and I had just started to give a correction on her method of delivery.
Q Then what happened?
A I was conscious of an explosion. I don't know what happened.
Q Did that throw you down?
A No. I was standing leaning over the back of the desk, my hands clasped over the desk.
Q Then what did you do after that?
A Turned and run in the south entrance of the school.
Q Then what did you do?
A I helped part of the First Grade, and I broke open the partition and helped out some of the Second Grade. Some had got out. And I noticed some High-School boys there, and then I went on into the Third and Fourth.
Q During the time you were in the school building was there considerable dust?.
A Yes. When I first went in, you couldn't see at all.
Q Where did you go after that?
A On through, and started to help throw away where the Third and Fourth Grade was, and I saw some children pinned down under the roof, and I tried to lift the roof off, two or three boys tried and we couldn't move it, and then I thought possibly in the excitement nobody had telephoned any help, so I jumped down from the north end
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and went down to the telephone office to make sure all telephone calls had gone through.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck then?
A Yes. I encountered him about half way across the yard as I was going to the telephone office.
Q Where did he come from?
A I don't know. The first I noticed, we was running side by side.
Q Did you go to the telephone office together?
A Yes, sir, to make sure all the calls were in, all the calls we thought of, and started back to the schoolhouse.
Q Did Huyck go back to the schoolhouse with you?
A I went about half way, and I turned around, and he went on, and I don't know why I went back to the telephone office. I went back, and I paused there just a moment inside the door, and I heard the Operator talking with Lansing people, heard her verify that everybody was coming that possibly could, and then I went across the street to Mr. Smith's house.
Q That would be Frank Smith's house, the Janitor?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck over there?
A No. I didn't.
Q Did you hear he had made arrangements there for beds?
A No, I did not.
Q Did you stay there?
A I stayed there, and out in front, for several minutes helping in cars in putting the injured children into the ambulances, into cars that served as ambulances. Dr. Haynes was there, he know me, and he examined them.
Q There was another explosion?
A Almost as soon as I got there. In fact, before I did anything at all, the second explosion in the street --
Q That would be after you got back from the telephone office the second time?
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A Yes, sir.
Q Were you in the Smith home at that time?
A I had just about reached the walk in front of the home.
Q Did you see the Kehoe car there?
A I saw several cars. People were driving in, and I didn't notice any particular car.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck out in front?
A No, I didn't,
Q Or Mr. Glenn Smith?
A No, I didn't.
Q You didn't notice any of those people in the excitement?
A I was across the street, and the cars were between me and them. In fact, I didn't look that way until I heard the flash of the explosion.
Q Did you go over where the explosion was then?
A No, I didn't. I started to. I realized then, and I heard somebody say that Mr. Huyck was killed, and somebody grabbed onto me and said it was a set job, and they got Mr. Huyck and "They will got you," and I realized there was nothing I could do, and I went on helping with the youngsters there.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck's body afterwards?
A No, I didn't. I knew it was there.
Q Did you know Mr. Kehoe?
A Not well, no. The only occasion I had to meet him was when he gave me my check at the end of the month.
Q You never had any conversation with him?
A No, very little.
Q Did you ever see him up around the schoolhouse?
A Occasionally, yes.
Q Would that be in the daytime?
A Usually. I was very seldom there except when something was going on, and as I think back I don't remember any meetings we were
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ever at.
Q In your Judgment, how long was it between the first explosion and the second explosion at the schoolhouse?
A It all depends on how long I was working in that First and Second Grade, and I haven't any idea, but I should say possibly 20 minutes and possibly longer, because I have no idea how long I was in the First and Second Grade.
Q Between these two explosions did you hear any explosions out to Kehoe's farm?
A No. I didn't know the explosion had taken place until after the second.
Q Did you know whether the grades were planning on a picnic the next day?
A Yes, they were,
Q Do you know where they were going on the picnic?
A As far as I knew they hadn't definitely planned. I didn't have to plan that for them. All I know, I heard them speaking about it at the table the night before.
Q Did some of these teachers board at the same places you did?
A Nearly all of us.
Q Do you,know whether or not this picnic in the lower Grades was an annual event?
A Yes. We have had one since I have been here, the Grades have always had a picnic.
Q Do you know of their going out to Kehoe's, and having them in his woods?
A It seems to me two years ago they did, but I am not able to verify that. Last year they went north and east of here in the woods.
Q Would the Grades get together on them?
A There was some fort of a plan, The were to divide. Last year the First and Second went together; and the Fourth, Fifth and Sixth went together, but whether or not there was any such division this year I don't know.
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Q You didn't hear Miss Sterling call up Kehoe's about using his woods?
A No, I didn't.
Q Or Miss Gutekunst?
A No.
Q Do you know whether or not Huyck was quite a hand to Work in his office evenings, did he sometimes go to his Office in the evening?
A I never was there very much myself, and I don't know for sure, except that I have heard that he did go back occasionally. That is, he would forget something and go back after it, or take something there, so he was running in and out, but so far as I know he didn't work.
Q If he did work, could he work without this gasoline engine rurming?
A Yes. We had two gasoline lamps.
Q Where were they kept?
A In the Janitor's room where they kept his supplies.
Q And if either one of you did work around there in the evening, you could use one of those lights?
A Yes.
Q Do you know whether or not for two or three weeks preceding this, whether or not he worked in his office in the evening?
A I do not.
Q Did you ever see automobiles drive up across the school yard?
A They did oocasionally. We were trying to discourage it as much as possible, but they still did it this Spring.
Q Have you ever seen automobiles in there at night?
A Not to my knowledge, except those that were there for meetings.
Q You never saw any car backed up against the school door?
A No.
Q Do you know whether or not Kehoe worked around there last Fall after school was started?
A I don't know as he worked any more than usual. I saw him occasionally, and he was there. He was there working, but I thought
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nothing of it, he was a Board member. Most of his work was in the basement too, and I was upstairs, and while I saw him occasionally, I don't know what he did or exactly when. I do know he was there at times.
Q Mr. Huyck wasn't going to stay here next year?
A No, he wasn't.
Q And you didn't intend to either?
A No, sir.
Q Did you know of any trouble between Huyck and Kehoe?
A I know there was some friction there, but Mr. Huyck wasn't of that type, he wouldn't tell me. He would speak of things the Board expected to buy, office equipment and things like that, but their little difficulties they had, he never said anything to me at all.
Q Did you know anything about this north door downstairs being open?
A I didn't. I had a key to the south door, and I went in and out that door. To my knowledge, I never have been through that door this year.
Q Do you know of their having trouble with it?
A Several times we had difficulty locking it, and I waited one night after Parent-Teacher's Association Meeting and helped the Janitor lock it, but I believe that front door was always locked.
Q When did you notice it first begin to jamb?
A Sometime in the winter. We laid it to ice. We found some ice ---
Q Up to that time did it lock all right?
A As far as I know it had been locking all right.
Q Did Huyck ever speak about that?
A About the door not locking?
Q Yes?
A Yes, he did.
Q That did he say?
A Only that he was dissatisfied, he didn't feel that the schoolhouse was as secure as it should be.
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Q Do you remember around the 5th of May that the front door wouldn't shut, there had been a jam there, been a pry on it?
A No, I don't remember,
Q You don't remember talking with Huyck about that?
A No. It was in the winter, there had been ice back of the door, and we spoke about it.
MR. SEARL: That is all.
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----

AFTERNOON SESSION,
1:30 P. M.

GEORGE L. HARRINGTON,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your name is George Leonard Harrington?
A Yes, sir.
Q How old a man are you Mr. Harrington?
A I am 58.
Q And what is vour occupation?
A I am a well driller and plumber.
Q You live here in Bath?
A All the days of my life.
Q And at one time were you janitor of the school building?
A I was.
Q How long were you janitor?
A Ten years.
Q When did you cease to be janitor?
A Two years ago, and I have done some work off and on since. I was janitor about a week for Mr. Smith when his mother died about four weeks ago.
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Q Before Mr. Smith was janitor who was janitor?
A There were two ahead of Mr. Smith, between Mr. Smith and myself, there were two. There was a Mr. Barnhardt. Dewitt Barnhardt had it only one year. No, I am mistaken. I relieved Mr. Barnhardt on the last three months of his term.
Q Who else?
A Then there was this man from St. Johns, and he was there a couple of months, and then Mr. Smith took his place.
Q Your business is drilling wells and plumbing?
A Yes.
Q You were janitor at the time this now school building was built?
A I was.
Q And were janitor in the old school building?
A Yes.
Q Do you know, as a matter of fact, that when the now part was built there was no basement built under the new part?
A Yes, sir.
Q That was built up just with the walls from the ground?
A Yes, sir.
Q So there was just a basement under the old part?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you ever enter under this new part?
A No. You see the plumbing was new.
Q No call to go in there?
A Never looked in there. Those little doors instead of being on hinges, was with a nail put in it and bent down. Just nailed right in.
Q Those doors were about 18 inches square weren't they?
A Just about 18 inches square. There were two of them.
Q They have been described here by Mr. Smith, you heard him describe them?
A I did.
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Q You would say they were in about the same location as he has described them?
A The same, yes.
Q You went there this morning of the 18th?
A I did.
Q To do some plumbing there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Something about fixing their well?
A Yes, sir.
Q. Who spoke about that to you?
A Mr. Detloff, one of the members of the Board.
Q The day before?
A Yes. As a matter of fact, this well had been bothering them for two or three days, and I had been there and repaired it, and as it developed, we couldn't get any pressure, and it was down in the well more than where we had been working, but this last job that was done on the well Mr. Detloff had seen me and contracted for it the day before.
Q So you had prepared the day before to go there and do that?
A I was notified so I could get my tools. I started out a little early to get my tools.
Q What time did you go to the school building, about the time the school called?
A No. When I was eating breakfast at home it was six o'clock Fast Time.
Q That would be six o'clock Bath time?
A Five o'clock.
Q Five o'clock?
A Yes. I thought may be they would want this work done before school. Oh, may be I was ten minutes or fifteen eating breakfast, and got right up out of the chair and got right into my car and went over and got my wrenches and collateral and came right back from the lake and drove around in the school yard and around to the
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back door and unloaded. I shouldn't think it was more than thirty minutes because it is good roads from there and I skipped right along. It wouldn't take me more than five minutes to pick up them tools and come right back
Q Was there anybody at the school seen you come there that morning?
A Mr. Smith, and as it develops, Mr. Smith and Mr. Detloff and Mr. Kehoe had been there and gone. The reason I know they had been there was because the building was all warm.
Q There did come a time when you went back to the school building?
A I stayed there. I didn't go away.
Q You were waiting for the school to call so you could get at your work, so the children would be out of your way?
A Yes. Mr. Smith said to wait, and I hung around there until the school called, and Mr. Kehoe and Mr. Detloff wasn't there that I saw, but they were there while I was over after the rig.
Q During the time you were janitor at the school did you know of there being any long hooks at the school, like fish poles, anything like that?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were they used?
A The boys have got a game of throwing.
Q Called javelins?
A Javelins. And the boys used them to see who could throw them the farthest.
Q Did you have any tools around the building there -- I think you know more about this than I do -- a stick used in the well, a male and female?
A We didn't have any around there. Those were used before this new school. Was used in the old school.
Q Never been around the new school?
A No.
Q How long has the new school been built?
A Five years.
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Q How long would those pieces be?
A About 16 feet. Of course they could very easy be from 12 to 16.
Q A female opening on one end and an end that would screw in there?
A Yes.
Q So the poles would screw together?
A Yes.
Q And they were used in tubular wells?
A Yes.
Q Do you know it Mr. Kehoe had any of those?
A He took all of those from the school. He was quite a hand for that, if there was a new pole put in he took all the old.
Q How long ago was that he took them home?
A Just shortly after the new well was completed.
Q How long would that be?
A During the first year. School started before they got the wall completed.
Q Between four and five years ago?
A Yes, sir.
Q Have you ever seen them out to his place since?
A Not until after the fair, I was up there, and I saw several of those connections that I recognized there after the Fair.
Q Did you see these at the school after the explosion?
A I saw them. The State boys brought them out and wanted to know what they were, and these sticks were cut right in two in the middle. They had been sawed right square in two.
Q The ones you saw brought out of the schoolhouse?
A All of them. They were all the same length.
Q What was the idea in sawing them in two?
A The ends of them would bring them to a point, and if he had a square end, what was going ahead of it wouldn't have a chance to slip by it. Give him more of a blunt end.
Q How many of those did you say you saw brought out of the school-
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house, or out in the yard?
A I should say there were four or five of those pieces, and all of those javelins.
Q Now, after you went into the schoolhouse to fix this well, Mr. Smith rang the last bells, the janitor?
A Yes.
Q And then came down?
A Yes, sir.
Q And were you in the pump house then?
A Yes.
Q And then you started your work?
A Then we started our work.
Q How long did you work there?
A I worked, as near as I could guess at it, about ten or fifteen minutes.
Q Then an explosion took place?
A Yes, something. Yes, it was an explosion. Just what it was then I didn't know, and it was an awful noise.
Q Did it knock you down?
A It didn't knock me down. I stood about five or six inches from a big heavy wall, and it throwed me up against the wall and back again.
Q Then what did you see?
A I turned around, and Mr. Smith, I wouldn't say he was down, but was partly down, and was straightening himself up, and he said, " For God's sake, what happened." He started up the stairs, and me right after him.
Q And you assisted in getting the children out?
A Mr. Smith and myself was in the building after the explosion until after the one on the road.
Q You say you were in the building until after the explosion in the road?
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A Yes. Getting those little fellows out, and we did get them all out that south door.
Q Mr, Smith said he went after a telephone pole and some other equipment. Did you go with him?
A No, I didn't. I just got out on the grounds there when they struck out across the grounds.
Q Did you see these men out in front?
A Yes, after they had fell. Yes, I saw them out in front.
Q You knew Mr. Huyck the Superintendent?
A Yes, I did.
Q You saw him there?
A I had to take special notice to see who that was, he was in such bad shape.
Q You would identify him as Mr. Huyck?
A Yes. I identified him by the coat, and he had a big heavy Masonic ring on his hand.
Q No question in your mind but what that was him?
A Not a bit in the world, and as I was looking around I found a foot and a shoe, and I laid that down by the rest of it.
Q What did you do after that?
A I looked around for Mr. Glenn Smith and the rest of them there.
Q And I presume you assisted in the rescue work there?
A Yes, done what I could.
Q Did you see Kehoe's car?
A Yes.
Q Did you see what was left there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Would you identify that as Mr. Kehoe's car?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe's body?
A I did.
C Would you identify that as Mr. Kehoe's body?
A I would.
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Q No question in your mind about it?
A Not a bit.
Q Do you know anything about this front door of the schoolhouse being jammed?
A Yes.
Q What do you know about that?
A The front door, what we could call the hardware to that door, that would be the lock, the hinges and the apparatus that opens it, all comes in a set, and it was a very expensive set. I think the hardware for that door they claim was $75.00. There was a bar that went across each door, if you pushed on it it would open right up and let you out. And it got so it wouldn't work, and the doors got somewhat sprung, I don't mean sprung, I mean shrunk, so there was quite a crack in the center of the door so the catch would hardly come over, and it was a very easy matter to take any little thing and slip that chuck back, that hook back, and walk right in. The children got so expert at it that they wouldn't stop three seconds and walk right in. They could open it quicker than you could with a key.
Q Did you ever talk with Mr. Huyck about that?
A Yes.
Q What did you say about it?
A We figured on stopping that by putting an angle on this one and letting it lap over on this one.
Q Was that put on?
A Yes.
Q When?
A About a year ago.
Q Do you know anything about it being sprung the last few weeks?
A I don't think it was.
Q You didn't have any talk with Mr. Huyck about it during the last
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six weeks?
A No. Not any more than we talked with Mr. Smith about it snapping, locking, and you couldn't unlock it any time during the day. I told him it ought to be fixed, and he said he would fix it. But it bothered for about a year, and I said that was such an expensive lock it ought to be kept in shape.
MR. SEARL: Well, you Gentlemen any questions you want to ask. I think that is all Mr. Harrington.

-----oooOOOooo-----

JOB T. SLEIGHT, JR.,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Job T. Sleight, Jr.
Q Mr. Sleight how old a man are you?
A 46 next August, 45 last August.
Q Where do you live?
A Adjoining the Village, on the northwest of Bath.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe during his lifetime?
A I knew him since he lived here nearly. In the Spring he moved here, but I don't recollect the year.
Q That would be about eight years ago?
A I think so. And along in the Fall, I had been interested in tractor plowing, and I had never seen them at work and I went over in his field to watch him, and when I got there I told him who I was, that was the first I ever met him, and told him what I went there for, and he was pleased to see me and had me get on the tractor and go across the field.
Q You have lived here all your life?
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A Except 16 years lived in Alma.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe's wife?
A NO.
Q You met her?
A I must have met her a few weeks --
Q It doesn't matter.
A What I was trying to think of, the hogs got out and I met her before I ever saw him.
Q During the time Mr. Kehoe was alive would you meet him at social occasions?
A Yes, sir.
Q He was a man to got out among his neighbors?
A Yes, sir.
Q And his wife belonged to a Friday afternoon club?
A Yes.
Q And he went to these?
A Yes, sir.
Q And sometimes gave speeches, toasts there?
A Responded to toasts.
Q He was a man that took part in the politics of the community?
A Yes.
Q Had a political following?
A Yes.
Q Did you know his stand on taxes?
A From what he told me, He said in his estimation the taxes was so excessively high he didn't know what would become of us.
Q You had been to different places with him?
A Yes. He had been with me. When I would make trips to Lansing I would invite him to go with me. Before he had to take the accommodation because he had no other way to go.
Q He was a man that lived within his means?
A Yes.
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Q Nothing extravagant?
A No.
Q I understand he didn't own an automobile until about a year ago?
A Not until he was township clerk.
Q Maud Detloff was Clerk and she died, and Kehoe was appointed in her place?
A Yes.
Q He filled in the rest of her term?
A Yes.
Q And he was beaten in the caucus?
A Yes.
Q He ran this last caucus for some office?
A For Justice of the Peace I think.
Q And he was beaten in that?
A Yes.
Q Did his farm come clear through to your place?
A His farm would corner on mine if it wasn't for the highway in between us.
Q Did you ever change work with him?
A No.
Q You had some relatives killed in this accident didn't you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Who?
A I had a nephew's wife killed, Mrs. Hart.
Q That would be Mrs. Blanche Hart?
A Yes. And Rose Hart's brother's boy, Arthur Hart and Maud Hart's boy, and Lavere Hart's boy, that is a cousin of my wife.
Q And before Kehoe had an automobile didn't you use to take him to Lansing on occasions with you?
A Yes, I did one time, and sometime in October --
Q Just a minute, we will got to that a little later. You made various trips to Lansing and other places as an accommodation to him?
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A Yes.
Q And after he got an automobile, do you know of him accommodating neighbors in the same way?
A Yes.
Q Mrs. Rounds, bringing out mild for her?
A Yes.
Q Did you know of his taking a Bert Smith to Lansing quite often?
A Yes.
Q This Bert Smith lived a neighbor to you?
A Yes, sir.
Q And he had some trouble with his eyes so he couldn't drive his own car?
A YEs.
Q And on different occasions he administered to the community in that way?
A Yes.
Q I understand you went to Lansitg and brought things out for the school, some engines and something?
A Yes, in October 1925, he asked me if I would go to town for him to get some bolts, pipes and fittings, and some range boilers he wanted for mufflers for the engine, and he wanted to know when I could go, and I selected my time according to the weather conditions. So we went up to the Michigan Supply Company and got some pipe fittings, and got two range boilers and brought them up to the school building.
Q Now, did you change work with him any?
A No.
Q Up around his place Somewhere?
A No. Not as I ever remember of.
Q Kehoe was a man that was a natural mechanic?
A Appeared to be to me. He was a skilled mechanic. He had his machinery so he could operate them from his tractor; his pointing levers and tilting levers were fixed so he could operate them from
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the tractor.
Q Had all kinds of tools?
A Yes.
Q Do you know whether or not he was an electrician?
A Yes, he told me he was.
Q Did he tell you he had worked as electrician?
A Yes, as a lineman.
Q That was out in Iowa?
A Yes, out in Iowa.
Q That was after he graduated from Michigan State College?
A Sometime after.
Q You use to visit with him on the way to Lansing?
A Yes. I remember one time in Lansing we were held up in the driving, and he said, "This isn't much like it was when I went to college here, you could get a street-car anywhere in the block, but now you have to watch and get it on the corner.
Q You didn't know of him being insane in any way?
A No.
Q You knew of his wife being sick?
A Yes.
Q Were you ever around his home during the last six or eight weeks?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice any wiring?
A Nothing of any kind. I wasn't around the buildings, just in the house.
Q When were you there?
A Two weeks ago yesterday.
Q You were just in the house?
A Just around to the back door to call on his wife.
Q Was she there?
A No. She was staying at her sister's in Lansing. She was taking treatments in the hospital.
(59)

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Q He didn't buy this automobile until 1926?
A That was about the time his time was out as Township Clerk.
Q Sometime in the Fall of 1925 he asked you to make a trip to Jackson?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did he say why?
A Yes.
Q What did he say?
A He called me up one evening, "Would you like to do me a favor and go to Jackson," and I said "I presume I can, maybe I can go soon, I have got to go to town anyway, and I will think it over and let you know." I did, I went to town the next day, and stopped and told him I could go.
Q Did you go that day?
A No. We made plans when we were going so he could write down to the parties for what he wanted.
Q What did he say he wanted?
A He said he wanted some pyrotol.
Q Explosives?
A Yes. He said it was explosive. He wanted to blast stumps on the west side of his farm.
Q Did you know of him dynamiting some on this farm?
A Yes.
Q And he had dynamited some?
A Yes.
Q He marked some of the stones?
A Yes. He marked all the blown stones with sticks.
Q Didn't you know that this pyrotol was put on sale by the government, and could be purchased from farm agencies?
A Yes.
Q Kehoe worked for the farm bureaus?
A Yes. He was very free about working for farm bureaus. He worked free of charge.
(60)

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Q He was going to get this pyrotol from a man in Jackson, from a man by the name of Decker?
A Yes. He said he would write to Mr. Decker when he would come there, so he did, and we went, and had a good day for it, and got the pyrotol seven miles northeast of Jackson.
Q How much did you get?
A Five hundred pounds.
Q And that was in ten boxes, fifty pounds to the box?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you came back what was done with that pyrotol?
A We drove to his home and put it in the main barn on the main floor.
Q Was anything said about selling it?
A Yes. On the way home he said he could sell some of it. He said he wouldn't mind selling it, and he said, "If you know anybody that wants to buy it, they can get it for a little more than I paid for it."
Q Did he tell anybody about his having it?
A Yes.
Q Who?
A Harry Barnard. On the way from unloading pyrotol at his home, and I went to the freighthouse to see about a stove I had there, and we loaded it on, Elder Barnard rode on the back, watching the stove. I told Elder, "I haven't been home since morning, I have been down to Jackson, I have been down with Andrew Kehoe to get some pyrotol." And Harry said, "I wish I had know that, I would have sent for some." We unloaded the stove and never thought any more about it.
Q Did you tell anybody about it?
A Several months after I told Mike Gawn. He said his brother Fred wanted to blast out some stumps. I told him he could get some pyrotol, they called it, from Andrew Kehoe, I went down to
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Jackson to get it for him, and he had 500 pounds, and I said maybe he can get it from him, and he said I will tell Fred, and probably he would want to get it there. And a few days after that, I asked him if Fred got his pyrotol from Andrew and he said no he didn't, he called him and couldn't get him, and he went to Lansing for it.
Q You don't think he ever got any there?
A No. I am quite sure he didn't. I know of Gawn blasting after that for two or three days.
Q Do you know of Kehoe blasting after that?
A Yes. Very often, one to a time.
Q You don't think he used up any quantities?
A Not of any quantities, not to amount to anything while I was at home.
Q This pyrotol came in square boxes?
A Yes, in square boxes.
Q And had "Pyrotol" stamped right on the box?
A Yes.
Q Do you remember numbers being stamped on the boxes?
A Yes, I do.
Q Would you remember any boxes?
A No, I wouldn't.
Q Did this farm bureau agent in Jackson say anything about having a whole carload in there?
A No, he did not. He asked Andrew how much was left, and he said it was nearly all gone, there was a party there from Perry that got a thousand pounds.
Q This pyrotol could be purchased by anyone that wanted to get it?
A I understand they were selling it to the farmers.
Q There was a lot came into Clinton before that?
A I understood there was. Mr. Kehoe said he applied to Mr. Kittle for some, but it was all gone.
(62)

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Q Did you ever have any talk with Mr. Kehoe about this pyrotol?
A Shortly after New Years time I was up here on the street and Harry Cushman said, "Say Job, did you hear a dynamite explosion New Years night," and I said, "No, what of it," and he said "Kehoe shot off some New Years night about midnight," and I said, "He was shooting off the old year," and he said, "I guess so, he was out looking the next morning to see if his chimney was on the house." Shortly after, I happened to call in to see Mrs. Kehoe, and she wasn't to home, and my wife was with me, and I happened to think of it, and I said, "I heard you were shooting off dynamite" -- I called it dynamite -- "New Years Eve," and he said "Yes, I thought I would shoot some off, I set some out and wired it up and set it for twelve o'clock."
Q He told you he had wired it up and set it for twelve o'clock?
A Yes.
Q Did he say whether it went off?
A Yes. He said, "I guess I jarred them up."
Q Did he say he was trying to experiment with it, and it worked all right?
A I don't remember he did, He just laughed in a kind of cheerful way as he always did. I didn't hear the report.
Q Did you ever have any talk with him about dynamite after that?
A That was the last time, and the only talk that I can remember of.
Q You didn't see the alarm clock?
A No.
Q You don't know how he had it wired up?
A No, I didn't question, didn't know anything about it.
Q You never used this dynamite at all?
A Never had any experience, only what I seen my father use it.
Q You never got any of this pyrotol?
A No.
Q Did you know of his getting any Giant or Hercules dynamite?
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A No, nothing more than that.
Q Any caps?
A He got the cap when we was there, four boxes.
Q Four boxes of caps in Jackson?
A Yes. And Mr. Decker wrapped them up by themselves, and I said, "You don't want those caps any place but in your pocket, and you keep them caps right with us," and he did.
Q Were they caps to be set off electrically?
A I don't know. I never even saw them. I think they were wrapped up in newspapers.
Q Did you ever see any of this dynamite or pyrotol after that around his barns?
A No. I never was around his barns very much. I never happened to inquire about it only the time of the explosion New Years.
Q You say your wife was with you at the time he spoke of wiring it up?
A Yes.
Q Was his wife there?
A Yes.
Q What did his wife say?
A I don't know. I don't know as they had knowledge of it. I guess my wife did know.
Q Did you ever know of any trouble between Kehoe and his wife?
A Not at all.
Q On this morning of the 18th, did you hear the explosion at the schoolhouse?
A I did. I was in the barn doing some chores. I had a sick headache. I had taken a little cold, I was out all the day in the cold and rain. I had the chores practically done, and my head felt as if I had stepped into a hole, and just then I heard an explosion, and of course I figured then it wasn't all my headache, it must have been the concussion of this explosion and I shut the door and went out in front and looked, and what was on my mind, I thought possibly
(64)

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the Power Company might be blasting to set poles, and by the time I got out to the door there I happened to think that Mr. Kehoe was blasting over there with pyrotol, so I looked over in his direction. I thought probably he had it in his barn, and it had exploded, and I didn't see anything was disturbed.
Q There wasn't any fire?
A No. Just then Mrs, Miller came rushing up and said, "Oh, they say the schoolhouse has been blown up," and I said it can't be possible, and just that soon I looked over and Mr. Kehoe's buildings was all in flame, and the big barn was in flames two-thirds the length of it, the sheep barn the smoke was floating up.
Q Did you hear any explosions over to Kehoe's place?
A Several took place.
Q What did it sound like?
A Like dynamite, dull thud. It wasn't a sharp crack, but a dull thud.
Q Sort of muffled?
A Yes.
Q Did you see pieces flying up?
A No. But there was such a black smoke I couldn't tell.
Q Did you come up to the schoolhouse then?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Kehoe at all?
A Just as I got down the road about four or five rods I saw a man, I thought it was Monty Ellsworth, but I saw it was Andrew Kehoe. I couldn't believe it, but there was a man by the name of Homer Jennison, and he hollered to me, "Wasn't that Kehoe," and I said I thought it was.
Q Did Kehoe speak to you?
A He waved his hand.
Q Did you see his face?
A Yes, I saw his face.
(65)

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Q Did he seem to be natural?
A I couldn't see very good, but he seemed to be natural.
Q He was alone?
A Yes.
Q And he had this Ford pick-up?
A Yes.
Q Just like Monty Ellsworth's?
A Yes.
Q And at that time he was going west?
A Yes, sir.
Q To go to your house from the schoolhouse you go down here to the end of the road and then turn to the left?
A Yes.
Q Then how far out?
A About 45 rods.
Q And you met him about half way between here and the corner of your house?
A Yes.
Q Homer Jennison was behind you?
A Yes, sir.
Q He spoke about it being Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q Was he driving rapidly?
A No, I had to get out of the road, and at that time he swung out of the road towards my yard, and I said is it possible he is going to stop in my place. Of course, he was turning out to clear the machine with the load of wheat.
Q Were you with your car?
A I was on foot.
Q Did Homer Jennison overtake you?
A Yes, and we stopped and talked.
Q And then you came right on in town?
Q Yes. I started out ahead by myself, and I got north to the
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corner and Rob Gates and his wife motioned to me to jump on the running-board, and I did, and rode up to the schoolhouse.
Q What did you do when you got here?
A When I got here I saw some of the children laying out in front of Frank Smith's, and laying on the ground, and I said to some around there, "What do they seem to be doing," and they said get water, and then of course it came to me that was what to do, and I got a pail and rushed over to where there were two children and I sat the pail of water down and left the water there, and as I was standing there the boy said, "What is the matter with me," he said, "I can't move." I could see him kind of wiggling his shoulder, and he said, "What is on my left hand," and of course I could see his hand was like a pumice, and a big lump on his head nearly the size of your fist, and at that time I left them.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A No, I saw his wife.
Q There was another explosion at the school yard?
A After I got hold of this pail.
Q After you got to the school yard?
A After I was holding this pail.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe except that once?
A Only on the road.
Q What did you do when that second explosion took place?
A I was in position where the flash blinded me. I could see a belt of a blaze go the whole length of the automobiles, and it just tossed it along, and it fired the tops as it went along, and I couldn't imagine what was causing it, and I even thought can it be possible anybody is shelling this place. I had read about the shells in the War.
Q Did it sound like shells?
A I imagined it did, it was such a sharp crash. And everybody was shouting, men and boys, "Come away from there," and the rest
(67)

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of us did all leave, and I came up to the sidewalk, and I met Clyde Cushman, and he said come hare and I said what is it, and he said dynamite, and he said they ought to go away until they can investigate it, and I went home, I was sick.
Q Then, did you recognize, or didn't you see the body of Kehoe?
A Not until I was up here again.
Q Did you see his car or anything?
A No, no.
Q Did you ever notice Kehoe around his yard at shooting practice with a rifle?
A No. He had a new rifle. I spoke to him about it once, he had a new rifle. And he took quite an interest in it. He had an old gun of Monty Ellsworth's one day that wasn't much use, and he was showing me that at the shop one day, and he said, "I am going to get a new one, and he showed me the new one, and I was never any hand for a gun, only to shoot sheep dogs or like that, so I handed it right back to him and never thought any more of its.
Q Have you any reason to think there was anybody else in this except Mr. Kehoe?
A I couldn't think so. I couldn't think there was anybody else in it except Mr. Kehoe.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----


MELVILLE W. KYES,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your full name is Melvin --
A Melville Warden Kyes.
Q How old a man are you Mr. Kyes?
(68)

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A Sixty-one.
Q And you have been a member of the School Board here for how long?
A Four years.
Q You have held the position of Secretary how long?
A Four years.
Q During all the time you have been on the School Board?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where do you live from Bath?
A I live northwest Of Bath on Section 1 of Dewitt.
Q How far would that be from Bath?
A Possibly five miles.
Q During the time you have been on the School Board you have known Andrew Kehoe?
A For three years.
Q He has been on it for three years?
A Yes.
Q And during that time you knew him?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you and Mr. Kehoe had some little trouble, didn't you?
A Yes, sir.
Q And that was about the school matters, and how the school should be run?
A Yes, sir.
Q You often differed about the policy of the school?
A Yes, sir. Most of the time.
Q You never had any trouble with him about the books, or any reason to suspect he was dishonest about the records?
A No, sir.
Q He was always accurate about that?
A Very accurate.
Q There was something said about a little difference of 23 cents which was simply a matter of bookkeeping?
A Just a small matter of bookkeeping.
(69)

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Q Do you know of Mr. Huyck sitting in on the School Board?
A Yes, sir.
Q Sitting on the School Board?
A Yes.
Q And Mr. Kehoe made some trouble about that?
A Yes. He didn't think Mr. Huyck should be on the school Board with us.
Q Did he show his enmity toward you on these meetings?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was there an open friction on the School Board between the two of you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, during the time you were on the School Board do you know about his doing work up around the school?
A I do.
Q And did that cause some trouble between you?
A Well, yes, as far as pay was concerned.
Q You took the position that a member of the School Board couldn't contract with the School Board for work and things?
A I did.
Q And you had some trouble with Kehoe about that?
A Yes, sir.
Q Last summer he did some work around the school?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you know when that was?
A It was in August.
Q What kind of work?
A He did some wiring there.
Q Do you know of his digging a sewer there?
A Yes, sir.
Q When was that?
A About the same time.
Q Was he working there about all of August?
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A Yes, sir, and the fore part of September. Would it be necessary to go back to that time?
Q You can fix it near enough I guess just by that. There was a resolution passed by the School Board at that time turning over some work to you and Mr. Kehoe, the supervision of some work. When was that?
A Mr. Kehoe and I?
Q Yes?
A It was Mr. Spangler and Mr. Kehoe. I made the motion that Mr. Spangler and Mr. Kehoe look after the repairing of the school property.
Q I see. Then you know as a general thing that Spangler didn't do any work around the schoolhouse, but Kehoe went ahead and did the work?
A Yes, sir.
Q So, in the month of August and before school started he had access to the school building?
A Yes, sir.
Q And was around there alone?
A Yes, sir.
Q And nobody would be there with him?
A No member of the School Board.
Q He often came with his truck?
A Yes. He done some of his repairing there.
Q And had cement to work with?
A Cement and tile, and what he would need.
Q I guess there is no question in the Fall in the trouble with the wiring, the Barker-Fowler people did that?
A That is what the record shows. That is what his bills show, and what they saids. I wasn't present when Barker and Fowler was there.
Q You don't know except what the bills show and what he said?
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A All I know, the Barker-Fowler bill came in.
Q That did come direct from them?
A Yes, that came direct from there, There is a difference of one cent on that bill that he had.
Q Did you know of some trouble on the School Board last year, when Kehoe wouldn't sign Huyck's contract?
A I do.
Q Did he finally sign the contract?
A He didn't.
Q It never was singed by Kehoe?
A No, sir.
Q And that was because of something personal between Huyck and Kehoe?
A Yes, sir. He didn't want him.
Q Huyck, I understand, was quite an advocate of the consolidated school, and Kehoe was against it?
A Yes, sir.
Q On January 29th, 1927, motion was made to hire a new Superintendent wasn't it?
A I wouldn't say, but I think so. There was a motion made the motion is moved by A. Detloff we accept Harry 0. Brandt.
Q After that did Huyck and Kehoe seem to get along all right?
A Not when I was present, they didn't have much to do with one another.
Q You and Kehoe never got along up to the last?
A No.
Q There was always open friction?
A Open friction, yes sir.
Q Do you remember being at the schoolhouse about the 5th of May, and finding the front door jammed?
A Yes I did, I unlocked and closed it.
Q And you had a meeting there, a school meeting?
A Yes, sir.
(72)

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Q That was in the evening?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you make some examination of the lock there?
A I did not. It was dark. At this time I noticed that it had been tampered with.
Q Did you say anything to Mr. Huyck about it?
A Mr. Huyck wasn't present.
Q Did you ever say anything to Mr. Huyck about it?
A I never met Mr. Huyck afterwards.
Q You never saw anything about Mr. Kehoe to indicate insanity, or anything of that kind?
A No, sir.
Q You think he was sane all the time you knew him?
A I do.
Q Did you ever neighbor with him, or go to his farm?
A No, sir. I only went to his farm once, and it was --
Q Something on business?
A In regard to our school work.
Q You had something to do with the Farm Bureau during its operation here in the County?
A Yes, sir. I was Vice-President a year.
Q And how long ago was that?
A About seven years, something like that. I couldn't recall just the time. I know it was about the first of its organization.
Q During the last two or three years do you know of the Farm Bureau selling pyrotol around here?
A I met Mr. Kittle soliciting for the sale of pyrotol.
Q How long ago was that?
A Possibly four years.
Q You don't know whether any of that was sold to Mr. Kehoe or not?
A No, I do not. It was sold to my nearest neighbor,
(73)

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Q Who was that?
A Mr. Henry Byerly.
Q Several of the farmers bought it around here?
A So I understood, but he was the only one I knew.
Q Where was you when the explosion took place?
A I was home painting?
Q Did you come right down?
A As soon as I could.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe around that day?
A No.
Q You saw the body?
A Yes.
Q You identified that body as Mr. Kehoe's?
A Yes, sir.
Q How did you identify it?
A By raising his head up and looking at him. I took Mr. Howell out to have him recognize him.
Q Did he recognize him?
A Yes, he did.
Q Did you see his car?
A I did.
Q Would you recognize it as his car?
A No, the back part was gone.
Q Did you ever notice that speedometer on the left wheel?
A No, I didn't. You see I never had much to do With Mr. Kehoe.
Q You kept away from him and he kept away from you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Mr. Kehoe wasn't to your farm this Wednesday?
A No, sir.
Q To go to your place would you go past this farm?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then when you got to Job Sleight's which way would you go?
(74)

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A North mile and a half, two miles.
Q Were you ever down in the basement of the school?
A I was.
Q Were you down there last year any?
A Yes, sir, several times.
Q When was the last time you were down there?
A I was down there most every meeting. I couldn't tell exactly when the last time was.
Q Did you ever notice anything unusual, or anything to indicate anybody had been tampering around the school?
A I did not. I noticed a few things in regard to Mr. Kehoe's actions. We use to enter the north stairs, and I noticed him in going down the steps with his flashlight, and it was spoken about, the engine, and he would be down there looking after it as I supposed, seeing if it was in working condition.
Q Would that be after the school meeting?
A Yes, nearly at the close of the meeting.
Q When was that?
A Oh, probably the last two or three months.
Q How long would he be down there?
A Just a minute or so.
Q And then he would come back up and go out?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did some of the rest of you going down there with him?
A Sometimes we did, and sometimes we didn't. I noticed him going down twice alone.
Q Did you ever go down with him?
A No sir, not alone.
Q Who did go down?
A Why, I think most of the Board went.
Q Did you say how long ago it was that you were last down in the basement?
A I think I was down there in Feruary or April. Let's see, in
(75)

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April.
Q In April?
A Yes.
Q You didn't see any wiring of any kind then?
A No, I didn't see any wiring. You see we had these flashlights, our lights weren't running.
Q Do you remember an occasion last Fall when some bees got into the school?
A I do.
Q And Mr. Kehoe was hired to get them out?
A Yes, and I think Mr. Mr Hugget and Mr. Huyck both tried to get rid of them. I know it was talked of.
Q Do you know whether he took out any bricks or not to get in there?
A No, I couldn't say. I wasn't around there only just at meetings. I was called in there once or twice in the daytime, but I didn't pay any attention to his work. I wasn't taking any interest in that, I wasn't called upon.
Q Did you ever hear anything about Kehoe having dynamite to sell out at his place?
A Not until after the explosion.
Q You have heard it some?
A I have heard it some since then, that he had dynamite.
Q Do you know anybody that ever bought any off him?
A No, I don't.
Q Did you hear these explosions out to your place?
A I did.
Q Can you tell how long it was between the first explosion and the second one?
A I couldn't, because my son just got back with his post and my wife called the schoolhouse was afire, and I came right up here.
Q When you got here Kehoe had been blown up?
A Yes, sir.
(76)

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Q That explosion took place when you were on the way here?
A Yes.
Q How near was you to Bath when you heard that explosion?
A I couldn't say. I don't know as I heard that explosion.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all. Do you know of anything that I haven't asked you about?
A I don't think so. Those bamboo poles I saw them on his bench when I happened to be there.
Q You saw them where?
A Laying on his bench.
Q At his home?
A Here at the schoolhouse.
Q Where he was working?
A Yes.
Q When, last Fall?
A Last August.
Q That would be the bamboo poles, not the well rods?
A Yes.
Q Those would be the so-called javelin poles?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did the School Board buy those for the children?
A That was bought I think through the athletic fund.
MR. SEAARL: I think that is all, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

HARRY BARNARD,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old are you Harry?
A 46 years of age.
(77)

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Q You have always lived aroud here in Bath?
A How?
Q You have always lived around in Bath?
A No. I lived in Victor. I was born in Victor, and lived there until about four years ago. I was born, I think, four miles and a half north of the city here, of the village.
Q You know Job T. Sleight, Jr.?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe?
A Yes, personally knew him.
Q How long have you known him, or about how long?
A Why, ever since about the time he came in this vicinity.
Q Did you ever have any talk with Job Sleight about buying some dynamite from Kehoe?
A I did.
Q He told us about the time in the Fall of 1925 he met you down here?
A He met me down by the depot, and he told me he had an old cook-stove.
Q While you were loading the cook-stove, you had some talk with him?
A Yes, about going over there and getting some dynamite. He said he got 500 pounds. I was afraid of the stuff, always had been.
Q Were you looking to buy some?
A No, I didn't care about buying any. He told me, said if I saw anybody that wanted any to tell them.
Q Did you ever go to Kehoe's after any dynamite or anything?
A No.
Q Do you know of anybody that did buy any off him?
A Not to my knowledge now. Not that I can ever recall of anyone.
Q Have you been to Kehoe's farm?
A Yes. I exchanged work with him.
Q Exchanged work with him?
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A And threshed there when I worked at the Howard Dolton farm.
Q Were you around there recently, during the last eight or ten weeks?
A No, I haven't been there to my knowledge in four years at least.
Q Have you met Kehoe on the street so you would know him?
A Yes, but not to have any personal talk with him. About four years ago I think I had a personal talk with him about my boy coming here.
Q Where were you when this school blowed up?
A Right in front of the drug store here in the Village.
Q The first explosion you heard, was here at the schoolhouse?
A It was.
Q What did you do then?
A I had some fishing tackle in my hand, and I run up and set it down at this yellow house across from the schoolhouse, and I run over toward the schoolhouse, and I didn't know whether it was time for school to call and it confused me, and I went around to the west side on the inside and went to rescuing.
Q You saw the children?
A I recollect the rescuing of two,
Q Did vou set Mr. Huyck, the Superintendent?
A I did not, not to my knowledge.
Q Did you stay up around the schoolhouse at the time of the second explosion?
A I had a teacher in my arms when the second explosion took place.
Q Where?
A On the west side, on the north side of the walk.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe drive up there?
A I didn't.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A No.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith?
A I saw Glenn Smith.
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Q He fell over?
A He fell over. I heard the explosion, and my vision caught Glenn Smith at about that angle (indicating), just as he was going over. That was the last I ever saw of him.
Q Did you see this car of Kehoe's afterwards?
A I saw what they said was Kehoe's car, what was left of it.
Q You didn't know it well enough to identify it?
A No.
Q Did you hear some talk up around there at that time about there being some dynamite?
A Not that I can recall.
Q Do you know anything else about this, about the cause of it?
A No, I don't know as I could give any oath that I could tell what was the cause of it, William.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you men have some questions.
A JUROR: Were you around the school yard when they took the dynamite out of the schoolhouse?
A No, I didn't see any dynamite, and I didn't see anyone that took any out.
A JUROR: How long from the first charge was it before his buildings was afire?
A As near as I can recall, when I was coming here from the depot, I must have heard an explosion, but I can't refresh it to my mind enough so I can give evidence to it, but I looked that way. I saw that smoke, and thought it was where his buildings would be because it was coming up real high, and I couldn't say I could have heard any report but these two, the first one and the last one, or we hope it is the last one.
MR. SEARL: Anything else, gentlemen?

-----oooOOOooo-----

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LEONARD HIATT,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Hiatt, how old a man are you?
A Twenty-five.
Q And where do you live?
A I live in Lansing.
Q And you are in charge of the Standard Oil Station here in Bath?
A Yes, sir.
Q And how long have you been here in charge of that?
A Well, I have worked here five years the 3rd day of this coming August.
Q You were acquainted with Mr. Andrew Kehoe?
A Done business with him.
Q Delivered gasoline to his place?
A Yes, sir.
Q Know where he lives?
A Yes, sir.
Q When was the last time you delivered gasoline to his house?
A May 10th.
Q How much then?
A Eighty gallons and 118 gallons of kerosene.
Q Was that put in drums some place?
A Yes, right there in the tool shed.
Q At the time you were there did he have kerosene on hand?
A Oh, two tanks had 110 and I filled them up and he had 30 on hand.
Q Did he have any gasoline on hand.
A About 10 gallons. He had 135 gallon storage, and I put in 100, and he had about 20 gallons.
Q About 20 gallons on hand. In your business dealings with him you never had any trouble with him.
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A No, Sir.
Q Always paid you for his gasoline?
A Yes, sir.
Q When he got it?
A When he got it.
Q When you were there last did you notice any wiring there?
A No, sir, I didn't notice anything out of the way.
Q How did he act, perfectly natural?
A Yes. That is, he did and he didn't. I didn't give it a thought when I was there. He kind of sat there when I was filling up his tanks, and he saw a pheasant going across the fields, and he said he wished he had his gun there, he would get it. That is all he said about it. I asked about his wife.
Q Do you think you would have noticed it if there had been any wiring there?
A Yes, I was familiar with the place, and I probably would have noticed it.
Q It was true that the Consumers Power was coming in here?
A Yes, sir.
Q It wasn't anything uncommon for people to wire their buildings, there might have been and you not noticed it?
A I didn't notice any.
Q Did you see anything to indicate insanity on Mr. Kehoe's part?
A No.
Q That was the last time you were there?
A That is the last time I was there.
Q Were you in the habit of filling these tanks every time you went there?
A I was in the Spring of the year. He always bought gasoline for his car on the average of once a mouth.
Q Do you know when he bought kerosene before this?
A Not since last summer.
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Q He hasn't been running his tractor to need it?
A No.
Q Do you know when he bought gasoline before that?
A Probably about the last part of March.
Q When this explosion took place at the schoolhouse were you here in front?
A I was right at the warehouse down there.
Q And where is the warehouse, just west of the tracks?
A Just west of the tracks.
Q On the north side of the road?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear any explosion before the explosion at the schoolhouse?
A No, sir.
Q Do you think if there had been an explosion at the Kehoe farm, do you think you would have heard it?
A If it had been very loud.
Q You were at your station?
A I was there at the warehouse, or at the blacksmith shop.
Q But when you heard this explosion you were at the warehouse?
A Yes, sir.
Q what did you do then?
A I locked up and went right up.
Q When did you see Andrew Kehloe before that?
A I don't know whether it was that morning or the day before, I saw him mail that package.
Q You saw him mail a box?
A I saw him mail a box.
Q About what time in the morning was that?
A Probably around 7:30 railroad time.
Q And when you got up to the schoolhouse what did see up there?
A Just saw the wrecked building is all, and kids screaming.
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Q The general conditions as has been described here?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck any place?
A I saw him coming off that back lean-to roof down a ladder.
Q Did you see him after that at all?
A I saw him going around in front, that was the last I saw of him.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith, the postmaster?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where did you see him?
A Right on the sidewalk.
Q Out in front?
A Out in front.
Q Did you see Mr. McFarren there?
A No, sir.
Q Or this woman along there?
A No, sir.
Q There was a second explosion at the schoolhouse?
A Yes, sir.
Q About how long after the first one?
A It wasn't over twelve or fifteen minutes.
Q What were you doing in the meantime?
A They called for help to prop up the front arch so to keep it from tumbling, and I run out to help them, and I was in about 40 feet of his car when it exploded.
Q When it exploded did you look out in front?
A I looked and saw the postmaster fall.
Q Saw Glenn Smith fall?
A Yes, sir.
Q Rolled down this embankment?
A He was on the sidewalk, and he fell and started to get up. Where he was later I don't know, because I went away.
Q You went away?
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A I went to a safe distance, because I thought there might be some more explosions.
Q Did you hear about dynamite?
A Yes.
Q What did you hear about dynamite?
A I don't recall, just that somebody said the school was full of it.
Q And you got out of the way?
A I got out of the way. It wasn't long after that they made them all get back until they were sure it was safe.
Q Was that after the State Police came?
A I don't know whether it was or not.
Q Do you know what kind of a car Andrew Kehoe drove?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see this wrecked car out in front?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see anything by which you could identify this car as his?
A Nothing, only he had this hub speedometer.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith, the postmaster, any after the explosion?
A No.
Q Did you se Mr. Huyck after the explosion?
A No.
Q Do you know anything more about this?
A Only what I have heard.
Q You haven't any reason to believe there anybody else in this?
A No, I haven't.
Mr. SEARL: I think that is all. These jurors may have a question. I guess not. That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

(85)

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SIDNEY J. HOWELL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Howell, how old a man are you?
A 61.
Q And you live a little west of Bath do you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q How far west?
A Oh, possibly a mile and a quarter.
Q And what section do you live on?
A 19.
Q To go to your farm from Bath, you would go south to the edge of town and then straight west?
A Yes, sir.
Q And David Hart lives to the east of you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Joins farms with you?
A Yes.
Q Lafayette Rounds lives west of you?
A Yes.
Q And Andrew Kehoe lived across the road from Harts, didn't he?
A Yes, sir.
Q Just about straight across the road?
A Yes, almost direct.
Q How long have you lived in your present location?
A Nine years last March, lst of March.
Q Where did you live before that?
A Ovid Township, Clinton County.
Q And Mr. Kehoe moved in where he lived about eight years ago?
A About one year later.
Q And you have known him since then?
A Yes, more or less.
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Q And neighbored back and forth with him?
A Yes, sir.
Q And he neighbored with other neighbors?
A Did he neighbor with other neighbors?
Q Yes?
A Yes.
Q Did he neighbor with the Rounds?
A Yes, and the Armstrongs.
Q Where did Armstrongs live from you?
A The next farm west of me.
Q The next farm west of you?
A Aha.
Q Now, you have been down around Mr. Kehoe's house some; that is, during the last six weeks or so?
A Oh, yes, yes.
Q You and your wife have been down there some?
A Not together, My wife and son was down there about two weeks ago, somewhere about that time, I don't know just when.
Q You and your wife use to go down there off and on?
A Oh, yes.
Q And did you continue to be good friends with Kehoe right up to the last?
A As far as I know, unless there was some feeling with him.
Q Did you have any trouble with him at any time?
A Never, at any time.
Q I heard something somewheres about your having some trouble with him last Fall over his beans, about you went down there to help harvest his beans and he didn't want you to?
A Melvin Armstrong went down there one evening, and he declined our offer, but there was no friction as far as I know, I didn't realize any if there was.
Q When do you think was the last time you were down to his house prior to this explosion?
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A Two weeks ago yesterday, I wasn't in the house, but I was there in his yard.
Q Did you go there on business of some kind, or call on him?
A Yes, sir, on business.
Q What business did you have there?
A He was going up to see his wife, which he did most every day, and we had a little offer to send up to her, was what it was. If you wish to know what it was, it was asparagus.
Q His wife was sickly?
A Yes, sir.
Q She had been away from home more or les since last October?
A A greater part of the time.
Q And he has lived alone there the most of that time?
A Yes, as far as I saw he did, when I was there anyway.
Q Would you go down to see him when he was alone, would you be in and around the house?
A Possibly I was there once or twice, I was there when he was alone.
Q You didn't notice anything unusual?
A Not anything that had been misplaced. I noticed a difference in him.
Q You did notice a difference in him?
A Oh, yes.
Q When did you first notice that?
A Possibly three months ago.
Q What did you notice that was different?
A Well, he was cooler than he had been before; that is, he wasn't talkative.
Q Your friendship ceased then?
A Yes. His mind seemed to be occupied by something else besides neighborhood talk.
Q At that time you were down there two weeks ago yesterday did
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you notice any wiring around his buildings?
A I didn't that time. In fact, I didn't at all.
Q There was a time when your son called your attention to it?
A Yes.
Q That was about ten days before this explosion?.
A Such a matter as that, I can't just remember, I think it was the week before the explosion, sometime during the week. He was down here to Bath with the team and het was going home, driving slow and he noticed it.
Q And came home and told you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you think anything about that, mistrust anything about that?
A The boy asked me what I supposed it was for, and I told him he probably expected to link up with the Consumers Power Company when they came in here.
Q The Consumers Power was coming in here to Bath?
A They expected to.
Q You didn't think it anything unusual for a man to wire his buildings?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe around there any during the last two or three weeks?
A Not in the last two or three weeks.
Q Had she been home much before that?
A She was home at one time for possibly -- now, I can't remember just how long she was there. I was down there once when she was home, just to make a neighborly call and see how she was.
Q How long ago was that?
A I don't recall just how long ago it was. I should judge it was six weeks ago, possibly two months, but I don't think it was quite that. Well, I wouldn't be positive what time.
Q Did you notice last year that Mr. Kehoe along in the Fall of the year seemed to neglect his farming?
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A He neglected it from the time he put the corn in.
Q From the time he put the corn in?
A Yes, I don't think he worked it very much.
Q Did he harvest any crops after that?
A I don't think he harvested a crop. He didn't harvest the corn or the beans. He may have harvested his beans, I wasn't home much in the daytime.
Q You were away in the daytime of this last year?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you working?
A In Lansing.
Q You just came home nights?
A Came home nights.
Q You did know he was a man that was mechanically inclined?
A I do.
Q Did you take things down for him to fix for you?
A Several times, small things.
Q And did you know of other neighbors bringing things in for him to fix?
A Yes.
Q And would several of the neighbors do that?
A I don't know as there was very many. I know of two.
Q Who were they?
A Melvin Hafelin and Bert Armstrong.
Q Do you know of Bert Smith taking some things down there?
A No, I do not.
Q He was always handy in fixing things up like that?
A He certainly was.
Q He had a lot of tools?
A He had every tool in the blacksmith line you could think of.
Q Would you say he was a good neiehbor?
A Yes, he was.
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Q Right up to the last?
A Yes, right up to the last, but, as I said he acted a little cool, as if his mind was preoccupied.
Q There did come a time when you saw there was wiring on the buildings?
A No, I didn't. I didn't happen to be down by there after he had the wiring done. If I was I didn't notice the wiring, I didn't see it.
Q On this day of the 18th, the day of the explosion, you were working in your yard?
A Yes, sir.
Q And who were with you?
A My two boys and young Armstrong.
Q What is your boys names?
A S. Robb and Alden P.
Q Are they your own boys?
A S. Robb is.
Q And this Melvin Armstrong is a neighbor boy?
A Yes. Lives on this first farm west.
Q How old a boy is he?
A About 28.
Q From where you were working in the yard could you see Mr. Kehoe's buildings?
A Very plain.
Q You did hear an explosion there?
A Yes, sir.
Q As you were working there?
A. Yes, sir.
Q Do you know whether that explosion came from his buildings or from the school?
A I am positive it came from the school, because It was just in the direction of the school, and I mentioned it to the boys at the
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time, I said, "That is about in the direction of the school."
Q You spoke to the boys about that?
A Yes, as they were standing there.
Q Did any of them say anything to you?
A One of them said possibly the boiler has exploded.
Q You thought the boiler had exploded then?
A Yes.
Q Did you see anything down to Kehoe's place at that time?
A Well, just possibly a minute and a half after that we heard an explosion there, not a very loud one, like a heavily-charged firearm being discharged.
Q And did you get in yolir car, or somebody's car and come down toward Kehoe's?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you do that before the explosion at Kehoe's place or afterwards?
A Afterwards.
Q You saw the fire down there?
A Saw the smoke.
Q Where did you see the smoke?
A Coming from the north barn the first I saw of it.
Q And then did all four of you get in the car?
A Yes, sir.
Q Whose car was that?
A Melvin Armstrong's.
Q Did you have any other talk before you got there?
A We saw Mr. Kehoe, we supposed it was, running from the house toward the barn just before.
Q Did he have anything with him?
A Not that I could see.
Q You would have seen it if he had had anything in his hands or arms?
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A Anything of any size, anyway.
Q When you got down to the Kehoe farm the buildings were all ablaze?
A Yes, they were blazing more or less.
Q Armstrong drove down by?
A Yes, he drove down by Mr. Cushman's place.
Q Did you and the boys get out of the car when you got there?
A Yes, sir.
Q You got out when Mr. Armstrong drove by.
A He came to a pause, and I advised him to drive on by there because his machine might get afire because the wind was in the north.
Q When you got in the yard where you see Mr. Kehoe?
A Out between the corn-crib and the barn, or the tile tool and the barm.
Q The house was nearest the road?
A Yes, sir.
Q And the driveway went on the west side of the house?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then there was a tool shed and some other buildings in the rear?
A 0h, yes, all the barn buildings were in the rear of the house.
Q And what do you call the barn thsy was behind his house?
A Directly behind it?
Q Yes?
A That was the large barn. I think the dimensions were 40 x 80. It was 80 feet long, and I don't know about the width, but I think that was about 40.
Q That was what he called his stock barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q And north of that and east was another barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q How large was that?
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A About 30 x 60.
Q And west and south of that was a tool shed?
A There was a tool shed west and south of the north barn.
Q And how large was that?
A I should judge about 20 x 80 feet.
Q There was some other buildings in there?
A A double corn-crib with a driveway in between.
Q And didn't that set between this tool shed and this sbeep barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q The main barn that you spoke of, that run which way?
A North and south.
Q And the sheep barn run which way? A East and west.
Q And the tool Shed run which way?
A East and west.
Q And which way did the corn-crib run?
A North and south.
Q And then there was a chicken coop off to the east?
A Between the house and the large barn, only to the east of it.
Q And this house and the farm barns were all relatively large buildings?
A Ohm yes. I might mention there was a hog house between the house and the main barn and a little to the east that he used the last two years for a shop.
Q That was where he had his tools?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you got down there were all these buildings ablaze except the hen-coop?
A Every one I think.
Q And when you saw him out by the barns there, what was he doing?
A He was in his little truck, Ford truck.
Q He had a Ford pick-up, a little Ford truck?
A Possibly you would call it that.
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Q Was he doing anything?
A He was sitting in the seat.
Q Was he backing up?
A Possibly. The smoke was so thick it wasn't so discernible as it might be.
Q Did he come up to the house?
A He drove up that way.
Q Did you see him have a funnel in his hands?
A I didn't, one of the boys said he did.
Q When he got opposite to you did he stop his car?
A Yes, sir.
Q Which side of the driveway were you standing?
A East side.
Q What did he say to you?
A "Boys", he said, "You are my friends, you better get out of her," he said, "You better go down to the school." That was all he said that I remember of.
Q What did you say to him?
A I said all right. I knew when he gave that warning possibly there might be something doing.
Q How did he look when he said that?
A Rather wild eyed.
Q Was his face white or not?
A No, I wouldn't say that it was.
Q Did you notice that he looked peculiar, or anything?
A I saw he looked wild eyed, and as if he was excited.
Q He was well dressed at that time?
A I don't remember what kind of clothes he had on at all.
Q There was nobody else with him in the car, he was all alone in the car?
A All alone.
Q And what did you do, did you get out of there or not?
A We run for the road.
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Q You ran for the road?
A Yes, sir.
Q All three of you?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you got in the road what did you do?
A We started east.
Q Up to that time did you hear any explosions in the buildings?
A I don't remember of it.
Q He hadn't taken out any furniture or anything out of the house had he?
A Not that I noticed. I am almost sure that he hadn't.
Q And did you run down the road to the eest or walk?
A Oh, we walked after we got on the highway.
Q Did he go out ahead of you, or you ahead of him?
A No, we went out ahead of him. He drove out behind us after we went out.
Q Did he pass you on the road?
A Yes.
Q Where were you when he passed you?
A Oh, to the east of the house possibly eight or ten rods.
Q Did he say anything to you when he went by?
A Not a word.
Q How was he driving, fast or slow, or how?
A Just a moderate rate of speed as I remember it.
Q What did you do then?
A We walked on down until we met Melvin Armstrong. He was going west from where his car was parked and we told him what Kehoe told us, we better get out of there, and we stopped and looked back at the buildings a little while, I rather think we did, and then we continued on down to his car, which was parked in Harry Cushman's driveway.
Q And then you came on in to the school?
A Came on in to the school.
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Q And did you hear another explosion before you came on in to the school?
A No, sir.
Q You didn't?
A No, sir.
Q Where were you when this last explosion took place?
A Helping them get out bodies at the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see Kehoe when you drove in there?
A No, I didn't. I didn't see Kehoe from the time he passed us on the road near the buildings, until I saw his body lying in Mrs. Smith's yard.
Q You didn't catch up with him?
A No. He had a chance to got a long way ahead of us.
Q And when you drove in, you went up into the school yard and helped getting out the bodies of the children?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did Armstrong and the boys?
A I don't know whether Armstrong did or not, the boys did. He had to park his machine, and we jumped out and ran toward the school. I don't know where he parked his machine.
Q What kind of a machine has Armstrong?
A About 1921 Dodge Touring. I wouldn't be positive about the model, but a Dodge Touring.
Q Do you drive a car of your own?
A Yes, sir.
Q How did you happen to drive Armstrong's that day?
A I didn't drive it. Armstrong was there at my place, and he drove his own car.
Q Have you a car of your own that you drive?
A Yes.
Q What kind?
A Ford Coupe.
Q Ford Coupe. And it isn't one like that Kehoe had, with the
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truck body behind?
A Oh, no.
Q That is the only car you have got?
A Yes, the only one I have got of my own.
Q And when you got to the schoolhouse where were you when you heard the explosion, up in front or behind, or where?
A I was on the west side, just north of the archway there possibly 20 or 25 feet.
Q And what did you do then, did you go out in front?
Q I stood up and took notice that was the first thing.
Q Then what did you do?
A Continued to work again after we looked around a little while.
Q Did you go out in front to examine?
A Not at that time.
Q Later on you did go out in front there?
A Oh, yes.
Q And you say this body over in Mrs. Smith's yard that you identified as Kehoe's?
A Yes.
Q You identified it as Kehoe's body?
A Yes, sir.
Q No question?
A Not in my mind.
Q How did you identify it?
A By the face.
Q You saw the face?
A The face was intact so I could identify it.
Q And his hair?
A And his hair. That was one peculiar mark about it, the way he wore his hair, we often noticed it when he was alive.
Q You were familiar with his car, you know what kind of a car he drove?
A I knew what kind of a car he drove.
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Q Could you identify that car there as his car?
A Identified the speedometer on the front wheel as his.
Q You would identify it by that?
A That was all I could identify it by, because most Fords are alike of that years make.
Q You didn't see him come up, come around any time after that?
A No, I didn't see him after.
Q You don't know whether he continued on down town ahead of you, or came in behind you?
A I don't know anything about that.
Q How long do you think it was between the first and second explosion at the schoolhouse?
A I should judge somewheres between half and three-quarters of an hour. Of course, I was working, but it seemed that long.
Q How long do you think it was before the explosion at the schoolhouse the buildings caught fire?
A I should say less than three minutes.
Q You say the sheep barn caught fire first?
A I noticed the smoke shooting from there first.
Q When you went in his yard did you see anything in the back of his truck?
A No, I didn't. I don't know as I looked in the back, I was was watching him.
Q Did you se anything in the front of it?
A No, because he got out on the opposite side of where we were standing, and I think the curtain was on the east side.
Q Did he get out and come around where you were?
A He got out first and went to his gas tank opening Where they fill it in the cowl there, and the first I remember of noticing -- at that time was watching the fire part of the time -- he was peeping down into it, looking into it, and he raised his head up and took the screw-cap and screwed it back in rather deliberately.
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and walked around his machine to where we were, didn't appear to be in a hurry
Q Didn't say anything to you all that time?
A Not until he got to where we were.
Q Where was it he was looking at his gasoline, down by the sheds?
A No, up where we were.
Q Did you se a rifle in the car?
A No, I didn't see a thing.
Q Do you think there was a rifle in the car, do you think there could have been one there and you not see it?
A Oh, yes, it could be in there and I not see it.
Q You were so excited then?
A I presume I was excited. Understand we were possibly 25 or 30 feet from him. He wasn't up near us; that is, the machine wasn't.
Q And did you notice any shells around there any place?
A No, I did not.
Q He was quite a man to shoot with a rifle?
A Yes, quite.
Q You would see him shooting out around his place there some?
A I have heard him different times.
Q You knew he had a high-powered rifle?
A Yes, sir.
Q And he had some other guns around his place, revolver and things?
A I never saw a revolver.
Q What other kind of guns, shotgun?
A I think it was a shotgun.
Q Did Kehoe ever talk With you about the school matters here?
A Yes.
Q And he was generally disgusted with the way the things were run?
A Oh, well at times.
Q About taxes being too high?
A Yes.
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Q Did he say the school was costing him a dollar a day for taxes?
A Never heard him say such a thing.
Q Have you heard him talk about Mr. Huyck, the Superintendent?
A Yes, I have heard him talk about Mr. Huyck.
Q Complain about the consolidated school?
A Yes, to a certain extent.
Q What do you mean by a certain extent?
A Well, he wasn't so very rabid about it, if that is what you mean.
Q You have heard some others in the Township complain about it?
A I certainly have.
Q Did you make some complaint about it?
A Yes.
Q That was on account of high taxes was it?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did he talk with you any about Mr. Kyes, the Secretary of the School Board?
A Oh, once in a while we would talk the whole of them over.
Q Kind of hashed them all over the coals?
A I don't know as we hashed them all over the coals, but we naturally talked about the School Board if we were talking about it.
Q I mean about the expense of it?
A Yes, about the expense.
Q Did you know about his doing work up to the school?
A I saw him working there I don't know just how much, but I have heard of him being there to work a great deal more than I saw him.
Q When did you begin to realize up here to the school Kehoe was the one that had done that, or had suspected?
A Why, I didn't suspect, I didn't think until I saw his body or his machine. I saw the machine, and I made up my mind that was what -- that was his machine.
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Q Were you sure that was his body right from the first?
A No, not from the first, because I didn't lift the face for a while.
Q You doubted it for a time?
A I did for a time. After a time I lifted the face and then was convinced it was Kehoe.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe's body the next day around the sheds there?
A The one that was supposed to be hers.
Q Were you around there any Wednesday?
A No. I wasn't Wednesda evening around the tool shed. Wednesday evening I don't think I went any further back than just the house.
Q Were there many people around there Wednesday evening?
A Quite a number.
Q Mostly up around the house?
A Well, yes, mostly. The greater portion of them were.
Q You saw where this body was found?
A Yes, I presume I was there by it two minutes after it was found, because the man that found it waved his hand to the crowd up by the house, and called them to come down there, and several others ran over there.
Q You saw what was the remains of a hog car?
A Hog chute.
Q And you had made that hog chute?
A No, sir. I gave Mr. Kehoe the wheels, and he made the chute himself, I suppose, as far as I know.
Q And do you know how long that chute was?
A I should judge seven or eight feet.
Q And it was built so that the wheels could be moved along the chute, wasn't it?
A Yes, sir, to adjust the heigth.
Q And about how wide was it, do you know?
A Possibly two feet and a half.
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Q And it had sides on it?
A Yes.
Q How high were the sides?
A Oh, I don't just remember, two foot and a half, three feet.
Q And was that all made of 2 x 4 stuff?
A Not as I remember.
Q I mean two-inch stuff?
A Not as I remember.
Q What was it made of?
A The cross-pieces were possibly made of 2 x 4, and possibly some of the upright. His slats along the side was inch stuff.
Q What was the floor made of?
A I think inch stuff.
Q And was it braced in some way?
A It had braces along the bottom, in under it.
Q Was there any iron braces used in it?
A Not to my knowledge.
Q These were adjustable wheels that could be easily taken apart?
A They could be taken from in under it.
Q That is what I mean, so they could be separated from it?
A Yes.
Q You saw the body there the next morning as it lay there, you said?
A Yes.
Q Have you any reason to think that Kehoe killed his wife?
A I don't know what to think, because I know nothing of it.
Q What do you think about that body being out behind there?
A My supposition -- or I formed an idea that he carried the body there after she was dead, thinking that the neighbors might possibly find it, because it wasn't hidden back farther from a building, and the intense heat of the buildings burning had ignited this chute and burned there. Now, that is only supposition, I know
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nothing about it.
Q That is only what you suppose?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice any evidence of oil on this chute?
A No.
Q Or any evidence of oil on the wood?
A No, sir.
Q Kerosene oil?
A I didn't.
Q Do you think he poured kerosene oil on there to make it burn?
A I know nothing of it.
Q From where you was on the morning, could you see that body from where you were standing?
A No, sir.
Q The buildings would be in the way?
A The corn-crib would be.
Q That body was west of the corn-crib a little?
A Yes.
Q And north of the tool shed?
A North of the tool shed, but not north of the tool shed from where we were standing, about straight north of the east end of the tool shed.
Q Well, you don't know, when you say you think he might have killed her before she was taken out there, you are just guessing at that?
A I am just guessing at that. I haven't been around Kehoe's for two weeks, or Sunday it would be a week and three days I hadn't been near to his farm, previous to the day we ran in there the buildings were afire.
Q You didn't see her around there at all?
A I didn't see her around there alive.
Q Do you go by Kehoe's on your way home?
A No, sir.
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Q You come in from the west?
A Come in from the west.
Q Your best recollection was there was a light down there about nine o'clock the night before?
A I rather think there was, I wouldn't be positive of it.
Q You heard about this time clock in the schoolhouse?
A Yes, I heard there was a time clock in the school.
Q Have you any reason to think he set that to go off at some other time then when it went off?
A No, I haven't, only that it didn't fire the whole thing, it made me think possibly it might have played him a trick.
Q Because the whole thing didn't go up at once?
A Yes.
Q You thought possibly the clock played a trick on him?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you think he meant it to go off the night before?
A That was my idea.
Q During the School Board meeting the night before?
A There wasn't any School Board meeting.
Q There was a Parent-Teachers meeting there the night before?
A Yes, sir.
Q You thought he intended it to go off then?
A Yes.
Q Why do you think that?
A Because he had no enmity toward the children, and I thought possibly he might have toward the people. In fact I never know him to have any hatred, be vindictive, but after the thing was blowed up, I made up my mind he must have had a hatred, and thought possibly --
Q Do you kriow of any reason why he should have killed the children?
A No, I don't know of any reason whatever. He was fond of children as far as I knew. He didn't have children of his own.
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Q Never had had as far as you know?
A Not as far as I krow.
Q You had seen him drive out of his place nights there some?
A No, I don't know I saw him drive out of his place nights.
Q Or in evenings?
A Yes, in the evenings.
Q From Lansing?
A He went west somewhere, I don't know where he went, I suppose on account of his wife.
Q Did you ever see him on top of his buildings working there or anything of that kind?
A No, I didn't.
A JUROR: Did you ever notice any of the young trees being girdled?
A The night after the fire.
A JUROR: Not before?
A No, sir.
A JUROR: Was this chute that Mrs. Kehoe laid in, was that burned up?
A Yes.
A JUROR: Did you notice any of the wire fences being cut?
A I surely did.
Q How long before that fire?
A Not until after the fire.
Q Did you see this sign on the fence, Mr. Howell, "Criminals are made not born."
A I did not. I heard of it the evening of the fire.
MR. SEARL: Any other questions. I think that is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----


(106)

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ROBB HOWELL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Are you the son of Sidney J. Howell?
A Yes, sir.
Q How old are you?
A Eighteen.
Q And have you always lived with your father on the farm there?
A Yes. Well, last winter for about four months I boarded in Lansing.
Q You knew Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q Worked down there at his place some?
A I never worked there except when Andrew was drawing manure several years ago.
Q And you have been down around his house some?
A Often been there, yes.
Q You have often been there?
A Yes, sir.
Q You know about his having a rifle?
A Yes.
Q And that was what kind of a rifle?
A It was a Winchester Model 54, bolt action, I think not less than '25 or '26. It was chambered for 30 caliber Springfield 1906 cartridges.
Q You saw some of the cartridges that were picked up in the street afterwards?
A Not to my knowledge.
Q Some were shown the other day to you?
A Yes. I don't know where they came from.
Q You identify them as fitting that gun?
A Yes.
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Q You know of his having a revolver?
A He told me he had got a revolver.
Q You saw some shells here the other day, some 38 caliber shells?
A Yes, sir.
Q You identified them as shells that would fit a 38 revolver?
A Yes.
Q Did you se him at different times shooting at a mark?
A With which gun?
Q With the rifle?
A Yes.
Q On his farm?
A Yes.
Q And did you ever see him shoot birds and things with it?
A No.
Q Did you ever see him hunt with it?
A No, I never saw him hunt with the rifle.
Q He showed that rifle to you last Fall?
A Yes.
Q Explained its action and how it worked?
A Yes.
Q Did you ever see a quantity of shells for it?
A He had two boxes. They come 20 to the box, and neither of the boxes were full.
Q That is all you saw around there?
A Yes.
Q Was he a man that done a lot of shooting?
A He done considerable. Not any more than I do.
Q You noticed that wiring on the house?
A No.
Q Was that another brother of yours noticed that?
A Yes.
Q Did you ever notice it on his house at all?
A No.
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Q When was the last time you were down there?
A About two weeks ago, somewhere along the latter part of the week, I don't know whether it was Thursday or Friday night.
Q What did you go down there on that occasion for?
A It was a letter that I wanted a notary to sign, and Mr. Kehoe didn't have the seal, and he wouldn't sign it for me.
Q He was a notary public!
A Yes.
Q Had a commission as notary public?
A Yes.
Q And you had gone down something about that?
A Yes, sir.
Q And were you in the house at that time?
A I was in the house, in the dining room.
Q Did you notice anything unusual in the house at that time?
A Nothing unusual except his table was covered with books. I saw several books you would tear out, like writing books and check books, and they looked like journals and ledgers.
Q Did you ever see the school books?
A No.
Q It might have been the district school books?
A Possibly so.
Q Did you notice anything else around the house unusual in any way?
A No.
Q How was he, as natural as ever?
A Not quite as natural as ever. He seemed to try to entertain us, but I don't know, he seemed preoccupied.
Q Who was with you on that occasion?
A My mother.
Q And that was the last time you were there?
A That was the last time I was there, yes.
Q Now, this Monday before Wednesday, that would be Monday the
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16th, you saw him coming home from Lansing?
A Yes, sir.
Q And that was sometime in the evening?
A Yes. I should say 15 or 20 minutes before dark.
Q He passed you in his car?
A Yes.
Q And there was some lady in the car?
A As he came up alongside me he blew his horn, and I saw it was Mr. Kehoe, and as he went by I could look in the back vindow and saw a lady's hat.
Q Do you know Whether that was Mrs. Kehoe or not?
A No, all I saw was the hat.
Q Did you recognize it as her hat?
A No.
Q Where was that?
A West of our place.
Q On the morning of this explosion, I understand you were working with your father there in the yard?
A Yes.
Q Which explosion did you hear first?
A One apparently down town here.
Q And was there some talk between you about it being down to the schoolhouse?
A Yes. The only thing we could think of was it being the boiler in tho school.
Q Who spoke about that?
A I think I spoke about it being the boiler.
Q Had there been some talk about it, about the boiler might explode?
A Yes.
Q That was the only thing you could think of was it!
A Yes.
Q What else was said between you?
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A We must have stood there a couple of minutes, and then we saw kind of a haze raising down by the school, and we could see the chimney and a portion of the roof standing, and we didn't see anything to realize it was blown up.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe's buildings then?
A In perhaps a minute, two minutes we heard a small explosion at the Kehoe farm, nothing near so loud as the explosion at the school, it was more like a high-powered rifle. A little afterward we saw smoke roll from the sheep barn, and then we saw smoke coming from them all.
Q Did they all appear to go at the same time?
A Practically the same time.
Q Did you see Kehoe around there at that time?
A As soon as we saw the flame from the sheep barn we started to run toward this automobile, and I rode on the fender, and I looked up and I could see Mr. Kehoe run down the slope from the houses toward his other buildings.
Q Do you know where his car was at the time?
A No, I don't know where his car was.
Q Did you drive rapidly down to his place?
A I should say 35 to 40 miles an hour, as fast as we could gather speed.
Q When you got down there, Armstrong went on?
A Armstrong slowed tip just a little east of Kehoe's, and I jumped off, and I think the rest did, and Melvin took his car on east.
Q And then what did you do?
A I ran up toward Kehoe's house until I was half way in the yard, and there was such clouds along the buildings, and I turned back to see if I could get in the house, and as I looked in the upstairs windows there was flames coming out of the windows, and no flames outside, but the inside just a mass of flames. And as I stood there trying to look into the smoke my brother and father came there and stood with me.
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Q Did you see Kehoe when you got down to the farm?
A As I stood there I heard a Ford, and in a few minutes later he drove out of the smoke opposite me.
Q Did you notice whether he had a funnel in his hands?
A No, I didn't see a funnel.
Q You didn't see the funnel?
A No.
Q Did you have some talk with him?
A He got out of the farther side of the machine and went around the machine, and I didn't notice That he was doing, and the next I noticed he was coming up to the bank.
Q Did he say anything?
A He said, "You fellows are friends of mine, please get out of here and go back to the school."
Q Did you say anything to him?
A I didn't say anything.
Q Did your father?
A He said, "All right."
Q Was anything else said by anybody?
A Not that I heard.
Q What did Kehoe do?
A He turned around and started out toward the road.
Q Did you se him looking in his gas tank t any time?
A No. He was standing opposite his car, I don't know what he was doing.
Q How did he look when he said this to you?
A I just got a flash or glance at his face, it appeared to me that his face was dead white, and his eyes to be black.
Q You all three went out in the road?
A Yes.
Q And then started east, walking toward the Armstrong car?
A Yes.
Q Then what did Kehoe do?
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A We got down perhaps 10 or 15 rods east of the Kehoe place, and we heard a car and we looked around and recognized Mr. Kehoe in his car, and he passed on and went towards Bath.
Q And when you got down to the Armstrong car, you got into that and all came on into Bath?
A Yes.
Q Did you catch up with Kehoe on the way any?
A No.
Q Did you ever see him again after that alive?
A Never. I saw his car pause as he was going into Bath near Mr. Ellsworth's oil station. It didn't seem to stop.
Q You did se it pause?
A Yes.
Q When you got to the school what did you do?
A Armstrong was driving the car, and as soon as he slowed up I jumped off and ran towards the school.
Q Did you see Kehoe's body afterwards?
A No.
Q Did you see his automobile?
A I saw his two front wheels and the axle out in front, and I should say that was Mr. Kehoe's automobile.
Q You would identify it as being Mr. Kehoe's automobile?
A Yes. That was the only one I know of that had a speedometer on the left front hub. It also had two new tires on in front.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck or Glenn Smith up around the schoolhouse?
A No.
Q Where were you when this second explosion took place at the schoolhouse.
A I was at the north end.
Q How long do you think it was before the explosion at the school and the time that Kehoe's buildings started to burn, or you heard that explosion down there?
A I think somewhere near a minute.
(113)

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Q And how long do you think it was between the first and last explosion at the school?
A We were working very hard, and I couldn't say just what it was, but it seemed to me 20 minutes or half hour.
Q Can you think of anything else about this that I haven't asked you?
A Not that I know of.
MR. SEARL: Have you gentlemen any questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----


ALDEN HOWELL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old are you?
A Twenty-three.
Q And you live with Mr. Howell?
A Yes, sir.
Q And he has raised you there as a son?
A Yes.
Q How long have you lived with Mr. howell, for the past nine years and upwards?
A About twelve years.
Q You were acquainted with Mr. Kehoe of course?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you worked down there around his place some?
A A little.
Q And helped him with his work some?
A Some.
Q When were you down there last?
Q Well, over a year?
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Q What?
A Over a year.
Q Where have you been in the last year?
A Home.
Q Didn't you go down to Kehoe's during that time?
A Hardly any. The last I was down there I was helping him in his harvest.
Q Last summer?
A Lonh about a year ago.
Q Did you help him last summer?
A Not a thing.
Q You saw this wiring down there?
A Yes.
Q A week ago or so before this accident, didn't you?
A Yes.
Q Were you down around his buildings then?
A No.
Q Just going by in the road?
A Just going by in the road.
Q What did you notice about his wiring?
A I saw it run from the house down to the big barn, and then to the other barn.
Q Did see there was two wires?
A Two wires.
Q And what part of the house did they come out?
A I couldn't say.
Q The north end somewhere?
A Yes, I hle north end somewhere.
Q And then from the house to the big barn?
A Yes.
Q And then from the big barn to the sheep barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then where did they go, from the sheep barn to the corn-
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crib?
A I didn't notice any to the corn-crib. I noticed they went to the tool shed.
Q Were they fastened to the top of the buildings?
A Close to the top.
Q Did you ever see him on top of the buildings?
A I saw him once, just before a big storm.
Q How long ago?
A Week or so ago.
Q Before the explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Which building was he on top?
A The big barn.
Q And what time of day was that?
A At night. Well, I should say about seven o'clock.
Q Which end of the barn was he on?
A He was just about the middle, right near the lightning rods.
Q Could you see what he was doing?
A No, I couldn't.
Q Did you ever see him up on any of the other barns?
A No.
Q Did you ever see him working on these wires?
A No.
Q Did you notice from time to time that there was more wires up?
A No. They were all up when I first noticed.
Q Did you tell your father about the wiring?
A I asked him what Mr. Kehoe was going to do, if he had his buildings wired.
Q And he didn't make any further investigation about it?
A No.
Q Have you ever seen this gun of his?
A No, I haven't.
Q Did he ever talk with you about it?
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A No. He never said a word about it to me about guns.
Q Do you know about his gettirg this pyrotol from Jackson?
A Never said anything to me about it.
Q Never talked with you about it?
A I never was interested in guns so he never tole me anything about it.
Q Do you know of him blowing up stones sometimes on his place?
A I have know of him blowing up stones and a few stumps.
Q Did you ever assist him in that way?
A No.
Q This morning the school was blown up, you were working with your father in the front yard, and the Armstrong boy was there?
A Yes. We was -- he was standing there visiting.
Q What did you hear first?
A This large explosion.
Q What was said then?
A We wondered what it was, and we looked down toward the school, and we saw a big cloud of smoke or dust, I don't know what it was at that time, and it settled down.
Q Did you think it might be the school?
A We thought of the school first, that it was a boiler first.
Q Who spoke about that first?
A My brother Robb.
Q And then did you see the smoke at the Kehoe place?
A I glanced down there and heard a similar report, and about a minute after that smoke was coming up.
Q You got in the Armstrong car and came down to Kehoes?
A Yes.
Q When you got down to Kehoe's what did you do?
A He slowed up, and we jumped off and went in to Kehoe's yard.
Q And when you went into Kehoe's yard did you see Kehoe there?
A No, I didn't, not until after he drove up in his car.
Q What did you do then?
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A I was looking around the house. First I noticed him get out and take the funnel out of his gasoline tank and look down in.
Q Take the funnel out of his gasoline tank?
A Yes. The funnell was in the gas tank.
Q You don't mean inside?
A Just sticking in like any funnel would.
Q And he took that off.
A Yes. I didn't Se him do anything else until he spoke to us.
Q When he took this funnel out of his gasoline tank, did he get out of his car to do that?
A Yes. He got out of his car and looked down in the gasoline tank after he took the funnel out.
Q And that was after he had driven up to where you were?
A Yes.
Q And did he put the cap back on the gas tank?
A I didn't notice him do that.
Q What did he do with the funnel?
A I don't know.
Q Did you see any rifle in the car?
A No.
Q Do you think you would have noticed one if there had been?
A No, I don't think I would.
Q What did he say when he came around where you were?
A He said, "You fellows are friends of mine, you better go on down to the school."
Q Did you say anything to him?
A No.
Q Did you hear anything said to him?
A No, I didn't.
Q Didn't hear anything said at all?
A No.
Q What did you do then?
A Turned around and went right out onto the road.
(118)

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Q Did you notice Mr. Kehoe's face at that time?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you run out in the road?
A I don't know. I couldn't say as I run, I walked right along.
Q And when you got in the road where did you go?
A Drove east towards Bath.
Q Was your father And your brother with you at that time.
A Yes.
Q And then you came down and got in Armstrong'se car?
A Yes.
Q And come on in to Bath?
A Yes.
Q Do you remember seeing Kehoe stop be Monty Ellsworth's oil station?
A I noticed him slowing up.
Q And had you got into Bath yet?
A No. We were stil walking.
Q When you got in to Bath did you se Kehoe's car at all?
A No.
Q Did you see Kehoe at all?
A No.
Q What did you do when you got there?
A Run around the school and jumped down in the back end and helped got the children out.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck the Superintendent, or Glenn Smith the Postmaster?
A No.
Q Where were you when this last explosion took place?
A I was kind of in the cellar; well, it wasn't the cellar either, kind of in the basement getting out children.
Q And that would be around in back of the schoolhouse?
A In the north end, yes. Down in under the roof.
Q Did you go out in front when you heard this explosion?
(119)

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A Just as soon as I heard that, we all run out in the street to see what happened.
Q And you saw this machine all lying there?
A Yes.
Q Did you afterward see Mr. Kehoe's body?
A No.
Q Did you go and look at his car?
A I went and looked at his car, and saw the speedometer on the left front wheel.
Q You would identity that as his car?
A I am sure it was.
Q Did you go back that night to the Kehoe farm and look around?
A Yes, after it cleared away down here.
Q What time was it when you came back to the Kehoe farm?
A Right around six o'clock.
Q Did you go down around this tool shed and corn-crib when you came back there?
A I don't think I did.
Q Were you back there the next day with your father when her body was found?
A Yes.
Q You saw her body there?
A Yes, sir.
Q You hadn't been out around there to set it the day before?
A had been around there that morning, but I didn't notice.
Q You didn't notice until your attention was called to it?
A No.
Q Did you know about this hog car?
A I had seen it.
Q Or hog chute. You had seen the chute?
A Yes, at a distance.
Q About how long was it in your opinion?
(120)

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A I should say about eight feet, may be a little longer.
Q Had you ever used it?
A No.
Q Do you know anything else about this that I haven't asked you about?
A I think not.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless you men have some questions you want to ask. That is all, I guess.

-----oooOOOooo-----

MRS. ANN ROUNDS,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your first name is Ann Rounds?
A Ann Rounds.
Q And you live west of Mr. Kehoe's place, and across the road north of Mr. Howell, do you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q How long have you lived there Mrs, Rounds?
A I have lived there about 37, 38 years.
Q And you have known Mr. Kehoe ever since he moved into that place?
A Yes, sir.
Q Before Mr. Kehoe lived there who lived there, Lawrence Price?
A No.
Q That is the old Lawrence Price place?
A That was Mr. Stewart's people I think.
Q That is the old Lawrence Price farm?
A Yes, the old Lawrence Price place.
Q Lawrence Price built the buildings there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did you know Mr. Kehoe before he moved in there any?
(121)

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A No.
Q Did you know Mrs. Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q Did you know her when she was a little girl?
A Since she was about 14 years old, before that even.
Q After the Kehoes moved in there did you neighbor with them some?
A Yes.
Q And he always proved to be a good neighbor?
A He certainly did, as far as we were concerned.
Q Did you exchange work back and forth?
A Up to the last two years we did.
Q Did there some trouble come up?
A No.
Q What was the reason?
A Mr. Kehoe wasn't doing much farming, and there was no reason to the last we should exchange. I think Mr. Kehoe drilled our beans a year ago last Spring.
Q That would be two years ago this Spring?
A A year ago this Spring.
Q A year ago this Spring?
A I think so. No, I believe that was it.
Q Last year he didn't put out or harvest many crops?
A That was Lavere Hart that put them beans in.
Q It won't make much difference. Last year he didn't harvest any crops?
A No, sir.
Q Left his beans in the field?
A Yes.
Q And his corn?
A I believe so. I never seen the field.
Q Did he have other crops?
A Not anything that I know of.
Q Was he away a good deal in the summer?
(122)

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A No, not particularly.
Q His wife went to the hospital in October, didn't she?
A I think so, about October.
Q And during the winter after the time she went to the hospital did you ever see him working around the farm much?
A No.
Q Would he seem to be around there in the daytime?
A I don't know as I ever saw him in the fields after that.
Q You know of his doing some blasting around there on stumps and stones?
A Mostly before that.
Q Did he do any this last fall or winter?
A I don't think so.
Q You knew he lived there on the farm, stayed there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you ever see his machine going in and out nights?
A I saw it going in several times, but I don't remember seeing it go out of the yard after night.
Q Did you ever see a light down in his place late at night?
A When I saw him drive in, I thought it was from the hospital.
Q That would be somewhere aroud nine o'clock?
A Around nine o'clock.
Q Nothing unusual about that?
A Nothing unusual.
Q Did you see any lights there three or four o'clock in the morning?
A No, sir.
Q Or any machines driving in there?
A Not any.
Q He neighbored with you right up to the last, didn't he?
A Why, yes, any favors we asked of them he was perfectly willing to do, and done it, and seemed anxious to be called on to do it.
Q Before his death he brought milk for you from Lansing?
(123)

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A Two weeks before his death.
Q Why did he stop?
A We didn't need any.
Q You didn't have any trouble?
A No, not a particle. He stopped in the yard and asked Lafayette if he wanted any more, and Lafayettte said no, we had enough of our own.
Q If anything was wrong did he come up to your place and fix it?
A Yes, he certainly did.
Q Did you ever notice anything about him to indicate he was insane?
A Why, no, we didn't think he was insane.
Q When did you last see him?
A As he was going towards the schoolhouse, when his buildings were burning.
Q When did you last see him to talk to him?
A About two weeks, three weeks ago I think, it was on Saturday afternoon.
Q Before his buildings were burned did you see him on top of his buildings?
A No, sir.
Q Did you notice any wiring between his house and the other buildings?
A No, I didn't notice any wiring. I have trouble in walking, and I didn't notice anything about it.
Q You did see him driving out after the fire?
A Not that morning.
Q When was it you saw him driving toward the school?
A I couldn't see him that morning. I saw him drive out of his yard different times, but not that time, because after the smoke started I couldn't see him.
Q Did you hear the explosion?
A I think the first one was at the barn.
Q Was that a loud explosion you heard?
(124)

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A It certainly was.
Q And did you afterwards hear, within two or three minutes, hear other explosions?
A I should imagine it was ten or fifteen minutes when I heard the second one.
Q Where was that?
A I thought it was at his barn in some machinery or something.
Q You thought both were at his barn?
A Yes, I laid it to the buildings.
Q Do you think there was an explosion at his barn before the one at the schoolhouse?
A I believe so.
Q How soon was it after you heard the explosion at his barns before you saw them burning?
A It couldn't have been more than a minute. I just had time to turn my head, and I saw it coming from the tool shed or hog barn, I couldn't tell which.
Q Did you see any smoke or dust arising near the school?
A No.
Q How long was it between the first you heard and the last one?
A The last one of all that happened, you mean?
Q Yes?
A Well, I couldn't tell. I certainly couldn't tell, but I imagine about 20 minutes. I wouldn't be certain. I supposed the explosions were all at his buildings until I heard the schoolhouse was blowed up.
Q You haven't any way of telling which was first?
A Not anything, only just as I was back in the back yard and when I went into the house I heard the one at the barn as I believed, and I went in the house to the telephone.
Q The first one was the loudest?
A Yes, the first one was the loudest. And when I went to the telephone, Mrs. Cushman was talking, and she said, "Hello, Lydia,"
(125)

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and she said what is that, and I said Kehoe' barn is burning, and I went outdoors, and the second one came that must have been at the schoolhouse.
Q How loud was that?
A I don't think it was quite a loud as the first one as near as I could imagine.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless you people have some questions.
Q You didn't go down to Mr. Kehoe's house, you stayed at your own home?
A I stayed at my home until my daughter came after me, and I went to Bath. That was after the second explosion, after the schoolhouse had been blown up.
MR. SEARL: That is all I think.

-----oooOOOooo-----

LAFAYETTE ROUNDS,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old a man are you Mr. Rounds?
A Seventy-one.
Q You live with your wife on your farm?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, you have know Mr. Kehoe I take it ever since he has lived in the neighborhood there?
A Well, eight years, but I never thought anything about this coming off at all.
Q No. And you neighbored back and forth there with him?
A Some.
Q Knew him, he was a man mechanically inclined, and got him to
(126)

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fix things around your farm?
A Once in a while, when he could do it handy.
Q Did you ever see anything to indicate he was insane?
A No, sir.
Q Seemed to be perfectly sane?
A Yes, sir. There couldn't be a better neighbor than him.
Q You knew about him taking a part in public affairs?
A No, never knew about it.
Q You knew he was a member of the School Board?
A Yes.
Q And ran for Township offices?
A Yes, sir.
Q And took part in election, and things like that, and social affairs some didn't he?
A Yes.
Q Did you see him around working around on his buildings?
A I saw somebody up there about a week ago, just as I went to put my cows in. It was a nasty, rainy day.
Q That was the Monday night before the explosion at the school there?
A Yes. I was putting my cows in, and I saw a man up there. I couldn't tell which one it was, and he was up there about three-quarters of an hour.
Q What building was that?
A The big barn, and when I looked he was gone.
Q You say he was there three-quarters of an hour?
A I think so, because I went in to milk, and when I came out he was gone.
Q Did you ever see him up on the buildings at any other time?
A No, sir.
Q Or anybody else up on the buildings?
A No.
Q Did you ever see any wiring around his place?
(127)

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A No, sir.
Q Did you hear this first explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where do you think it took place?
A I thought it was down to his place. Instead of that, they said it was down here.
Q You saw his buildings catch fire?
Q. Yes, sir. I was mowing my lawn, and there was some awful cracking going on around there, I could hardly stand on my feet.
Q That was other explosions?
A Yes, sir.
Q How many?
A A lot, I couldn't tell.
Q That was during the time the buildings were on fire?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see anybody go down toward his buildings?
A No, I must have been on the north side of my house.
Q Did you see Mr. Howell go down there?
A No, I didn't see him go by at all.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe go by your house at all?
A No, sir.
Q Any time after that?
A No. My wife seen him go by, but I didn't. I was mowing the lawn on the other side of the road, back of the house, so I didn't see nobody, but she said she saw him go by, and he waved his hand at her when he went along.
Q When was that?
A The morning of the fire.
Q Was that after the schoolhouse had been blown up?
A Yes, sir.
Q She saw him going up there?
A Yes. The first shot went off, and he went back and touched off
(128)

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the other.
Q He went by your house going east?
A He went clear around the square.
Q You didn't see these wires down to his place?
A No, sir.
Q Were you down to his house after the fire?
A Yes, I was down there Wednesday afternoon a while.
Q Did you notice these trees that were girdled?
A Yes, sir.
Q How many did you see?
A Golly, I guess all of them.
Q Do you know how many there were?
A No, I didn't count them.
Q The fruit trees out in the orchard?
A No, just around the house.
Q Just the small trees around the house?
A Just the small trees around the house. I didn't know anything about the orchard trees being girdled.
Q You didn't go down to the school?
A No.
Q You have a bad heart, and didn't go down?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

WARD KYES,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Kyes, how old a man are you?
A 31 the 31st of October last year.
Q And you drive one of these school buses?
(129)

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A Four years if I had drove today.
Q And that bus goes out and picks up the children and takes them to school each day?
A Yes, sir.
Q And do you take them home at night?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you are the son of Melvin W. Kyes?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, you were acquainted with Andrew Kehoe?
A Not until he got on the School Board.
Q Then, that would be the last three years?
A About that. I knew him when I saw him, but I wasn't acquainted with him.
Q During the time he was on the Board, did you attend the school meetings?
A Yes, sir, most generally.
Q On account of taking your father there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you have any business there?
A No business.
Q Did you notice this friction on the School Board between Mr. Kehoe and Mr. Huyck?
A He seemed to be against everything, every proposition that was put up.
Q Some friction between he and your father?
A No more than anyone else.
Q When you drove this school bus you went by his house?
A Tha wasn't where my route was. They gave me that privilege of cutting across half mile south and coming across on the gravel.
Q When you went home at night the last year did you go by his place?
A Not unless the roads were bad.
Q So how long has it been since your route his been by his place,
(130)

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or you would drive by his place?
A I could go by there any time.
Q There was a time when you would drive by his place every day?
A Two years ago that was my route.
Q Did You notice at that time anything unusual about him?
A No, I didn't know him well enough.
Q There was a time when you came by he looked at his watch?
A He did once when he was in the road back of his farm.
Q He would be in the field there?
A He would be in the field there, and he would always look at his watch, and I always figured he looked to see what time I was making.
Q Did he do that every time you came by there?
A About every time I came by there and I noticed him.
Q During this time did you notice anything unusual about him to indicate he was insane?
A No, sir, I thought he was an awful smart man.
Q On this morning of the 18th you had brought the children in?
A Yes, sir.
Q Had you gone home?
A The first explosion I was just a little over a half mile from my home.
Q That would be about 4-1/2 miles out?
A Just about.
Q You live with your father?
A No, sir.
Q Where do you live?
A Just across the river on Section No, 1. I lived with my father for about six months after I was married, and then went across the river.
Q Did you see Kehoe that morning in town?
A No, sir. I didn't stop that morning in town at all. I most usually do.
Q You didn't see him around at all?
(131)

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A No, sir, didn't look for him.
Q Before that it was the custom for Kehoe to give you your check?
A Yes, sir.
Q When did he give you your last check?
A The last pay-day, that would be 20 days from today. We draw our check every 20 school days.
Q At that time did you havo some conversation with him?
A That morning he seemed awfully good-natured. Before that he always handed me the check. I always spoke good morning, and he would hand me the check. On this morning my feet slipped off the clutch and I dropped it on the floor, and he said "You better keep that, that may be the last you will ever get,"" and I looked at him and laughed and said, "Are you going broke," and he said, "I guess not."
Q He would be there to meet you with your money?
A Yes, absolutely, always.
Q When you heard this explosion down to your place did you come in to Bath here?
A May be I stayed at the house just a minute, and I heard that awful explosion, and I said to Finn what is that. I knew it must be an awful explosion to cause that smoke and the sound, and I may be stayed there a minute, and I went right out and got in my bus and drove home, and I left my bus and I put a bridle on a horse I had for riding to work and I heard the second explosion, and I came right to Bath.
Q How long before the first and second explosion?
A I wouldn't say more than 15 minutes. I might have stayed there at that house longer than I figured.
Q Then you came in to Bath?
A Yes.
Q When you got in here --
A When I got in here I knew something awful had happened.
(132)

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Q When you got to the school what did you see?
A I stopped at the railroad track, the little ones were running across lots like rabbits.
Q You picked some of the little children up?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then you helped here?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: That is all.
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----

BATH, MICHIGAN,       
May 24, 1927.     
9:35 A. M.   

MONTY ELLSWORTH,
a witness produced, sworn and examined testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Ellsworth, how old a man are you?
A Thirty-nine.
Q And where do you live?
A I live half mile west on the Gunnisonville road.
Q You run this Shell gasoline station?
A Yes, sir.
Q And how long have you lived there, running that station?
A Just about three weeks I started there. I lived there about three years.
Q What was your business before that?
A General store in Bath.
Q Run a meat market in connection with it?
A Yes, sir.
Q You are a married man?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were you acquainted with Mr. Kehoe?
(133)

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A Very well.
Q How long had you known him?
A Practically eight years, since he lived there.
Q And have you been up around his farm some?
A Yes.
Q When you ran store here in town did you live out there?
A No.
Q You lived here in town then?
A Yes.
Q Did you buy any cattle off him?
A I bought one beef off him is all. I bought hogs off him several times. I bought hogs from him about three weeks ago, I bought what hogs he had.
Q About three weeks ago?
A Yes.
Q At that time you bought all the hogs he had?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did he have any other stock around the plece at that time?
A He had two horses at that time.
Q No hogs, or cattle, or sheep?
A He sold his cattle about a year ago. I don't know when he sold them, he just took them right down and shipped them.
Q During thiS time he had no other cattle?
A About the time I bought his hogs he let Al. McMullen take one of his horses. He didn't tell me this, McMullen did. He was all excited, said Andrew wanted to let him take a horse, and he had harnassed it that morning, and it got loose and ran down the road, and I says I will take you and help you find it. McMullen is crippled up and can't walk very well, so I said I will take you. Somebody told him it came down the back road, so I took McMullen about a quarter of a mile this way and we found the horse, but I understand he took the horse back.
Q You understand the horse was at Kehoe's when the fire occurred?
(134)

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A Yes.
Q Did you ever have trouble with Kehoe of any kind?
A No.
Q he was always neighborly?
A Yes. He always repaired my boiler in the slaughter house, and he set it up in fact, and I am no mechanic and if I had anything wrong he would come up and fix it. I knew he was shooting a lot. In fact, he showed me a new rifle he bought last Fall.
Q What kind of a rifle was it?
A It was a '30', bolt action. I never looked at it. I use to go up to the Department of Conservation and get guns, and there was a 25-30 rifle and when I went out of the store he wanted to know what guns I had, and I told him about this. It run along to a couple of weeks ago, and I was down to get some couplings and he said, "I thought you was coming down and fetch your rifle."
Q Did,you know of his shooting around his farm considerable?
A Yes. I went by there two or three times and he had a target set out there between the tool house and corn-crib, and I said, "I won't be very busy tomorrow, why don't you come up to my place,"so the next day he came up and we shot about 20 rounds apiece.
Q You say that was about two weeks ago now?
A About two weeks before the explosion.
Q He came in his car?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice what he had in the car?
A There was a box in there about two feet long and about a foot wide, and there must have been a thousand shells in there.
Q Would that be these 30 caliber shells for the rifle?
A Yes.
It was full the whole length of the box in the bottom with those boxes setting up edgeways.
Q Small boxes of shells?
A Yes.
(135)

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Q Did you say anything about that?
A No.
Q Do you know whether he was a good shot with a rifle?
A Yes. he was.
Q Very good shot?
A Yes. We was shooting three hundred feet, and we shot off-hand, and he was very close off-hand at 300 feet, so he wasn't very nervous.
Q Did you see him after that before the explosion?
A Let's see. Yes, I was down there, I don't remember -- I went down for something, but I can't tell now what it was, and he asked me, he says, "I like that rifle of yours, will you give me $25.00 difference for that rifle of mine," and I said, "No, I wouldn't give that much difference because I have no use for them." I did say I would give $10.00, and he said, "That gun cost me $50.00, and they didn't have the sights I wanted, and I had to sent to Detroit, and they cost $11.00.
Q How soon was that before the explosion?
A I think it was the next day after he was down to my house.
Q And during any of that time did you see anything about him to indicate he was insane?
A No.
Q Did you see any wiring about his place when you were down there?
A No.
Q It might have been there and you not notice it?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you on this morning of the explosion?
A I was planting melons east of the gas station.
Q From where you were planting melons could you see down to Kehoe's?
A Yes.
Q Could you see the schoolhouse?
A I could see the chimney, but not the schoolhouse.
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Q You heard the explosion sometime that morning?
A Yes.
Q About what time was it that morning?
A Gee, I don't know what time it was.
Q Around eight or nine o'clock?
A Yes, somewhere.
Q And that was on Wednesday the 18th?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now when you heard theat, can you tell which way the sound came from or where it came from?
A No, I couldn't tell. It seemed .to be all over. The first thing I looked off in this direction, but I was looking on the ground in those woods. It sounded as if it was in those woods that are in a northwesterly direction, and I just glanced in there, and I swung around scanning the ground to the north and to the west, and when I swung around there was a cloud of smoke came out of the barn the east and I hollered to the section men, and I hadn't more than got that out of my mouth when smoke came out of the big barn and the gable end of the house, first came out of the north end of the gable, right in the top, and the other buildings I saw the smoke coming out. I couldn't tell where it started because the black smoke rolled up. My wife was just cleaning house and had the curtains down, and she run to the window and she saw everything in the air, and she said, "My God, the school is blowed up," and she came downstairs and we came down here.
Q Your wife came down with you?
A Yes. And somebody said your boy is safe, and the wall had dropped down and there was a pile'of children under that, and there was Joe Pope and a half dozen others -- I remember Joe because we tried to lift that up. Joe said if we had a rope I think we could pull that over, a I said I will run to the slaughter house and get some there. I started back, and when I got to the corner here, about half way down that road to the west I met Kehoe, and he
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grinned, and I could see all his teeth.
Q He was in a car at that time?
A Yes.
Q What kind of a car was he in?
A Ford pick-up.
Q You are familiar with his car?
A Oh, yes.
Q Did you meet this Armstrong boy that morning in the car?
A I don't remember.
Q Do you remember seeing Mr. Howell?
A I don't remember. I went to the slaughter house and throwed those ropes in, and I stepped back and threw in a set of tackle block, and I drove up to the school as soon as I could, and I throwed those ropes out and somebody came out and started to sort those ropes out near the --
Q Where were you standing at that time?
A Just to the west of the schoolhouse.
Q When you drove up did you see Mr. Huyck or Mr. McFarren or Mr. Smith?
A No,I didn't.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe when you drove up?
A No.
Q How long do you think it was between this first blast you heard and the last one?
A Well, it couldn't have been more than fifteen minutes at the outside, because I don't believe I was down here -- I don't believe I was here more than five minutes before I went after rope, I might have been. I don't believe I was here more than five minutes, and I drove back there and throwed them in, and I had just nicely got the ropes out when this blast came out in the street.
Q Did you go out there?
A No. We just stood there like a lot of dummies, and somebody said we will have to get these bodies out of the cars. The cars
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were starting to burn.
Q Was it necessary to get water to put the fire out on the cars?
A They rubbed them off, it wasn't big blazes.
Q Did you go out where the automobiles were?
A Yes, sir.
Q What did you see?
A First I saw Glenn Smith, and then I turned around to get a rope or something to bind his leg and when I came back somebody had a belt off and put that on, and when I came back Mr. MaFarren lay there, and somebody said who is that, and I said Nelson McFarren.
Q You would identify him as Nelson McFarren?
A As soon as they told me I saw who it was.
Q Did you see the Superintendent, Mr. Huyck?
A Yes, sir.
Q You could identify him all right?
A No, I couldn't.
Q Did you see this Mrs. Perone there?
A No. I seen her at the building when I was there the first time. I remember seeing her there.
Q You do remember seeing her there before you went home after the ropes?
A Yes, but not afterwards.
Q You saw this car of Kehoe's afterwards?
A About an hour afterwards.
Q You would identify that as his car?
A I certainly would. I had looked at the speedometer. I looked at the speedometer this Spring. It set there, and I looked to see how far he had drove, and it was nearly 8,000 miles. About an hour after it happened, I didn't know it was him, and we looked at those front wheels. Nobody thought whose car it was, and I didn't think about the speedometer until later, and somebody said he saw it, and I went and looked again and there was over 9,OOO miles on his car, so I said that was his car.
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Q Would you identify that as his car?
A Oh, yes.
Q Did you see his body?
A I Just glanced at it.
Q You didn't see it well enough to identify it?
A No.
Q Did you go back and help take the children out of the school?
A Yes. I couldn't do very much. I helped carry them out, the other fellows took them out mostly.
Q Did you see Kehoe come down past your gas station?
A No.
Q While you were working the melon patch did he drive up by your place slowly?
A No.
Q He didn't call or wave at you that morning?
A No.
Q Do vou know of any reason why Kehoe should have blowed up the school?
A No. Several times he spoke about his high taxes, but I never argued with him. But he use to say that school made an awful exspense, but I never answered him. But he hadn't said a word, as I recall, in over a year even about his taxes.
Q Have you any reason to believe there was anybody else in with him?
A No, knowing Mr. Kehoe, I wouldn't.
Q Why do you say that?
A He was always by himself. He seemed to be a man with himself always, I had that impression.
Q A man that didn't take other men into his confidence?
A While he was awfully friendly, there was something about him, you didn't feel right close to him.
Q You knew about his living alone there?
A Yes.
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Q About his wife being away?
A Yes.
MR. SEARL: I guess that is all, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

WILLITT C. WHITNEY,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Whitney, you live here in Bath?
A I do, yes sir.
Q And how old a man are you?
A I am 66 my last birthday.
Q Whereabouts in Bath do you live?
A Well, I live right -- that is, my house faces this streat that crosses right here. Go down to that first --
Q You live near the telephone office there?
A We11, just this corner lot between the telephone office --
Q Between here and the telephone office?
A Between my house and the telephone office. No, I don't live between here and the telephone office. Go down that street and my house site on the back end of the lot.
Q You live west of the telephone office?
A Yes. You asked me where I lived from the schoolhouse?
Q Yes. You live about a block or two from the schoolhouse?
A If I came around the road it would be a block just about; that is, one length of a block.
Q And on this morning of the 18th were you at home?
A I was.
Q And were you doing some work in the house that day?
A I was.
Q What were you doing?
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A I was helping my wife clean the kitchen.
Q Did you hear an explosion that morning?
A I did.
Q About what time was it you heard it?
A I would say Standard Time, somewhere about nine o'clock.
Q You mean Central Standard Time?
A Yes.
Q And was your wife in the house?
A Yes.
Q Anybody else there?
A No, not that I remember of now. I don't think there was.
Q What did you first hear there?
A The explosion at the schoolhouse.
Q Then what did you do?
A In order for you to understand, I was standing on a chair right by the south kitchen door, next to the schoolhouse, and had started to wash the woodwork for the top of the door, and it either shook me off the chair or shook the chair out from in under me, and my wife said, "My God, what is that," and when I got up she was out the door, and she said it was the schoolhouse, and we started to the schoolhouse.
Q When you got to the schoolhouse were there other people there?
A A few, yes.
Q You were one of the first there?
A I must have been, because all the time it took me to get there was to run to the schoolhouse, perhaps 20 or 25 rod.
Q What did you first see when you got up there?
A I saw some people working, and I saw the schoolhouse was all blown to pieces.
Q You saw this roof down that has been described?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck around there?
A Just at that time I didn't, but I went up to the northeast
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corner of the schoolhouse and started to work in there, and Mr. Huyck came around to the east side of the schoolhouse, and he said to me, "Go and got some ladders and help get those scholars off the roof.". So I went out and got a ladder and put it up and helped take those scholars off, and came back and went to work at the northwest corner, and that was the last I saw of Mr. Huyck.
Q You didn't see him after that?
A No. I saw a body that had a blanket laid over it, and they said Mr. Huyck laid there, but I didn't see him.
Q Did you se Mr. Kehoe around there that day?
A No. I don't think I did, I don't remember.
Q Did you hear another explosion that morning?
A When the car blowed up.
Q Where were you?
A I had got the ladder and was working at the northwest corner.
Q You were helping get the children out?
A Digging and helping get them out, yes.
Q How long was it between the first and second explosion?
A If you had asked me then I would have said ten, fifteen minutes, but after thinking it over, it must have been 25 minutes, because I couldn't have done all of that short of 25 or 30 minutes.
Q And did you see anybody do anything just before the second explosion occurred out by those cars?
A No. My back was turned to the cars.
Q Your attention was attracted that way until the explosion?
A Until the explosion, yes.
Q Did you know Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q How long have you know him?
A Know him ever since he came here I would say, it was somewhere about eight years.
Q Have you been with him on occasions?
Q Well, I operated a cream station in this building right here,
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and I bought his cream most of the time he sold cream.
Q Do you still run the cream station?
A No, I don't.
Q When was the last business you had with him in the cream station?
A I presume to say that he sold cream within a week of that, but I went out of the cream station a year ago last June.
Q You have sen him off and on since then?
A Oh, yes.
Q Did you ever see anything about him to indicate he was insane?
A No, I didn't.
Q How recent had you seen him before the explosion?
A I don't recall, but the last I remember was when I was standing in front of the pool-room when they were having a school meeting, and he went by with some books and spoke, I don't know what, and went right on to the school meeting.
Q For all you know he appeared to be perfectly natural?
A Why yes.
Q Have you ever ben on the farm?
A Not since he has been there. I can't recall but once of being on the farm since he was there.
Q Do you know anything else about this that I haven't asked you about?
A Why, not that I can recall, not in the shape of any threats or any remarks.
Q Did you ever see Kehoe around the schoolhouse nights?
A No, I never did.
Q Or daytimes?
A I have seen him around there daytimes.
Q When was that?
A Last Fall, they tore up that drain. I saw him there then.
Q When they tore up the drain?
A Yes, from the schoolhouse down.
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Q Did you ever see him working around with his truck?
A I have seen it in front, and I have seen it in the yard when he would be there to work.
Q You have never seen him around there nights?
A No, I never have.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

MRS. CHARLOTTE HOWELL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name, Mrs. Howell?
A Charlotte.
Q And you are the wife of Sidney J. Howell?
A Yes.
Q And I assume you live with your husband on his farm west of the Village?
A Yes, sir.
Q Your husband said you lived there about nine years?
A I think so.
Q I assume you are acquainted with all the neighbors, the Harts and the Rounds, and you knew Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q And you knew Mrs. Kehoe?
A Yes, I did.
Q I understand you and Mrs. Kehoe had been quite friendly since you people lived there?
A I think always the best of feeling, as far as I know.
Q Your families went back and forth there?
A Yes.
Q Did there ever come up any trouble so you didn't go back and
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forth?
A No, no. When Mrs. -- now, I hardly know how to answer that. When I was in there the hired girl asked me to go upstairs up to the room where she was.
Q When was that?
A Last winter, and she ran to me and she started an awful coughing spell, and I said Mrs. Kehoe if I possibly hurt you I will go out, and she said I will hurt you, and I said Mrs. Kehoe you know there is nothing in the world I wouldn't do for you, and she said I know it, and I went out.
Q Was she out of her head or anything?
A No. She had an awful coughing spell, she had asthma.
Q Was she troubled with tuberculosis?
A They said they found a couple of germs once, and they say since they decided it wasn't.
Q You knew of Mrs. Kehoe going to the hospital last Fall?
A Yes, sir.
Q And she was gone most of the winter wasn't she?
A Yes, nearly from the first Of September.
Q Do you remember of her coming back this Spring; that is, she did come home for a while this Spring?
A Yes, sir.
Q About how long ago was that?
A I can't tell you.
Q Do you remember being down there to the house with your son?
A Yes.
Q When was that?
A He had a paper he wanted signed and Mr. Kehoe was a notary, so we went down sometime in February and said he wanted a notary, and Mr. Kehoe said there wasn't one in Bath that had a seal like he wanted, so he took him to Lansing.
Q You went down a couple of weeks ago?
A Yes.
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Q When was that?
A About two weeks.
Q You think it was about ten days before this explosion?
A It was that much, and possibly two weeks.
Q Whem you went down there was Mrs. Kehoe at home?
A No, she wasn't.
Q Mr. Kehoe was there?
A He was there.
Q And you went in the house and visited with him?
A Yes, the boy and I both.
Q When you were in the house and you saw him, did you have some conversation with him?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did he appear to be entirely natural to you?
A I didn't think he was natural.
Q What did you think was out of the way?
A I couldn't tell, it was intangible, but I could feel there was a difference. He tried to be courteous and everything, but he was different.
Q Did you notice anything to indicate that he was insane?
A Not unless it was cunning insanity.
Q What do you mean by cunning insanity?
A I had a brother-in-law that went like Mr. Kehoe, and he was just shrewd.
Q Did you notice the wires from his house to the barn?
A No.
Q Didn't your son speak about them?
A No, that was after dark.
Q Didn't your son speak about it?
A The other son. He came in from the field one day and he said, "Andy is getting ready for electric lights," just that way, and we didn't know anything about it.
Q That is your son Alden?
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A Yes.
Q Did you look down toward his house to see?
A No, I couldn't see.
Q You couldn't see that far?
A No, I couldn't see.
Q Now, on the day of this explosion on the 18th of May, you were at home weren't you?
A Yes, sir.
Q And your husband was working in the yard?
A We were all out in the yard, and Melvn Armstrong.
Q You were out in the yard too?
A Yes, all of us.
Q Were you there when they spoke of the explosion?
A Yes.
Q What was said?
A They looked and said what is it, what is it, and one of them said it must be the school, and then there is smoke, and then the other explosion came like a rifle explosion, and then the buildings all burst out.
Q You say it was like a rifle explosion?
A Yes, to me.
Q You have heard rifle explosions before?
A Not many.
Q You heard Kehoe shooting there at other times?
A Yes.
Q Did you hear this explosion on New Years Eve it midnight?
A I don't remember.
Q Did he ever tell you about that?
A No, I don't remember.
Q Have any conversation about setting off a charge of dynamite on New Years Eve?
A Not that I remember. I knew of him setting one off on the 4th
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of July one time, and we started toward there thinking something was wrong, but that was two or three years ago.
Q Did he do it with a clock?
A I don't know. She said the little boy was having some fun.
Q She meant Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes, it was just a joke.
Q This day of the explosion, Mr. Armstrong and your husband and two sons went down toward the house?
A Yes.
Q Did you go across to Mrs. Rounds' house?
A Yes.
Q Had some talk with Mrs. Rounds about the fire?
A I didn't say much about the fire. I went to her and asked her if they would watch our horses, I unhooked them and left them in the lane, and of course I didn't know anything about the school. I got worried about the acetylene tank in the basement, and I know father always got out to fight a fire so I went down to find them.
Q Down to Kehoe's?
A Yes, and I couldn't find them anywhere around and of course I didn't know anything about that, and I thought may be they got in the basement where the acetylene tank was, and I couldn't hardly get home.
Q Did you walk down there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go in the house?
A Oh, no, it had been burning there.
Q Did you see some other men there?
A There was men out in the road.
Q Did you see some men out in the road, and have some talk about it?
A I might of.
Q Do you remember of telling them there was somebody it the
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building, or something in the building that ought to be got out?
A I thought she was. I went over to Mrs. Hart and she screamed, and I asked her if Mrs. Kehoe was in the house and I finally got her to say she wasn't, and I said I am afraid she is.
Q Did you know whether Mrs. Kehoe was home or not?
A Not for sure.
Q You climed over the fence?
A Around by the buildings to see if I could see the Armrstrong machine.
Q You couldn't see the Armstrong machine from where you were?
A No. I didn't know what was going on. I couldn't see any signs, and I asked two or three and I came back home.
Q Before you went home you climbed over -- which fence would that be, a little east of the house?
A I was in two or three of those little yards trying to get back.
Q Did you go clear around the back of the buildings?
A Not clear around. I came around to the henhouse.
Q And everything was blazing around there at that time?
A Oh, yes.
Q And lots of smoke and dust?
A All I remember was seeing the flames, I was pretty excited.
Q And how did you got out of there?
A Why I must have come out over the fences, there was no other way.
Q You don't remember?
Q I remember coming out at the road, at the guard-rail.
Q That would be the guard-rail east of the house?
A Yes.
Q And did you see anybody else around there?
A Oh, yes, lots of cars and lots of people.
Q Came along there and stopped?
A Yes.
Q Did anybody go in the house and try to get things out while
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you were there?
A No.
Q Then what did you do?
A I went home.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe around there any place?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see anybody else there that you could name?
A Saw may be Mrs. Hollister. I don't remember whether she was in the car, I think she was in the car.
Q Did you come up to the schoolhouse then?
A No.
Q Did you know anything about the schoolhouse then?
A No, no. I went up then as fast as I could go there and asked a man to let me ride to see where Armstrong and the boys were. He told me they was all right as far as he knew.
Q That morning did you see Kehoe go by there?
A No, I didn't.
Q Didn't you see him drive by after this explosion?
A No, I didn't.
Q If he had gone by there he would have passed you in the road?
A If he had gone west.
Q If he had gone east he would?
A Oh, no. I don't know.
Q After his buildings caught fire if he had come down that road wouldn't you have noticed?
A I wouldn't, so many cars.
Q Do you know whetherany cars passed you going east?
A I think there was. There was so many cars that went to the house, and they were moving.
Q After you went after Armstrong did you go back home?
A Melvin took me home.
Q And did you come up to the schoolhouse at all that day?
A No, I wasn't to the schoolhouse until, I think it was Thursday or Friday, Mr. Chapman's boy was buried. I don't know whether it
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was Thursday or Friday. I wasn't to the schoolhouse then.
Q Have you been over to Kehoe's house since then?
A Yes, when they found her I went down with two sheets.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe's body?
A No, the State Police had it covered, and they didn't want my sheets.
Q Did you ever hear Kehoe make any remarks about blowing up the schoolhouse or anything of that kind?
A Never.
Q You knew he did kick about the taxes.
A Everybody did.
Q Who do you mean by everybody?
A I have heard different ones kick about the taxes. I have heard most everybodykick about the taxes being high, speak about it. Q Do you know of any reason why Kehoe should have blown up the school?
A No.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all unless you men have some questions. That is all I guess, Mrs. Howell.

-----oooOOOooo-----

MRS. LA HALL WARNER,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your full name is La Hall Warner?
A Yes, sir.
Q And there is no period after the initials?
A No.
Q You live here in Bath Mrs. Warner?
A Yes, sir.
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Q How long have you lived here?
A Well, all my Life except five years.
Q That five years has been some time ago, how long have you lived here recently?
A For the last ten years.
Q You are a widow as I understand?
A Yes, sir.
Q You live about a block north of the school?
A Yes.
Q And on the west side of the road on the corner?
A Yes.
Q Have you some children?
A No.
Q And this morning that the school was blown up, Where were you?
A I was standing right opposite my front window on the front porch, putting up a curtain.
Q And you heard this explosion?
A Yes, and it broke the glass to the window I was putting up the curtain.
Q What did you do then?
A I ran outdoors and to the schoolhouse.
Q What did you see?
A Before I got there I saw the roof falling.
Q You saw the roof falling as you were running to the achoolhouse.
A Yes. When I got to the schoolhouse it was all down.
Q Did you go in the school yard?
A Yes, I went all the way round the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck that morning?
A I did, and talked with him.
Q Where did you see him?
A On the roof.
Q And was that when you were in back of the school?
A Yes, on the east side.
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Q What did he say?
A He asked me to get axes and ladders.
Q Did he say what had happened?
A No.
Q Did you ask him?
A No.
Q Did you get axes and ladders for him?
A Yes, I had ladders and axes home, and I sent Harrison Ewing after them.
Q Who is that?
A The young man in the store.
Q Is that the same as Don Ewing?
A No, a brother.
Q He was a brother of Earl Ewing?
A Yes.
Q Earl was one of the brothers that was killed?
A Yes.
Q Were there children on the roof when you got there?
A Yes; that is, a lot of them on the roof.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where?
A I was on the sidewalk, but I saw him when I came back the second time after I got the axes and ladders.
Q You didn't see him before?
A I didn't see anybody until I got clear to the schoolhouse, there wasn't a person in sight.
Q So you were the first person that got there?
A I believe I must have been, because I didn't see Mrs. Huyck until I got around to the north side.
Q Where did Mrs. Huyck live?
A South of the schoolhouse.
Q And she had run over there too?
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A She had ran over there too.
Q You run over to your home to get these ladders and axes?
A Yes. I carried the axes myself. Harrison Ewing carried the ladders.
Q Where did you go, back then?
A They asked me to get my beds ready, and I didn't go back.
Q After you had delivered the axes you saw Glenn Smith?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you talk with Mr. Huyck again?
A I never saw him again then.
Q Did you talk with Glenn Smith?
A Yes.
Q What did you say to him?
A He asked me if I would open my house and get my beds ready for the children, and I told him I would.
Q Where was Glenn Smith when you met him?
A He was on the street sidewalk going south.
Q And then you came back home and opened up your house for the children?
A I did.
Q And you didn't go back to the schoolhouse?
A I didn't go back because they came and asked me to make sandwiches and coffee, and I was so busy.
Q Did they bring some of the children to your home?
A No. They came and got bedding and everything I could give them to take to the schoolhouse, and they also got a cot to take to the hall. I was up that way, but I didn't go to the schoolhouse because I was busy making sandwiches and coffee.
Q Did you hear a second explosion?
A Yes.
Q Where were you when that happened?
A I was in my home the second time.
Q How long had you been in your home before that second explosion?
(155)

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A Not more than 15 minutes.
Q You would estimate the time between twelve and fifteen minutes?
A Yes.
Q Which was the louder?
A The second one done more damage to my house. I don't know as it was louder. It blew out more windows, and done more damage to the house than the first.
Q Was there just one window broke in the first place?
A No, I had four broken.
Q How many was broken by the first explosion?
A Just one I think. There may have been some of the others. I didn't know there were others. The second explosion it blew one of the locks out of one of the doors and blew the screws clear across the floor.
Q Where was that door, on the south side of the building?
A Yes, and I think a window broke out that time, because I heard glass.
Q Do you know anything else about this?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe in town that morning?
A No.
Q At any time?
A At no time.
Q You knew Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q How long had you known him?
A Ever since he came to town. I didn't know him very well, only when I saw him.
Q You didn't have any business transactions?
A None whatever. I was well acquainted with his wife, I had known her all my life.
Q You don't know anything else about this in any way?
(156)

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A No.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

HERBERT FIZZELL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old a man are you Mr. Fizzell?
A Fourty.
Q And where do you live?
A I live on the Gunnisonville Road two miles south of Gunnisonville.
Q And how far west of Bath would that be?
A Four miles west and two south.
Q You remember this day the 18th of May; that is, last Wednesday?
A Yes.
Q You were at home that day?
A Yes, sir.
Q And do you have a man that works for you upon the farm?
A Yes, sir.
Q What is his name?
A Fred Krull.
Q Was he at home that day on the farm?
A Yes, he was.
Q And were you doing some work around there?
A Building fences.
Q Did you hear an explosion that morning?
A No, sir, not until after I came over here.
Q Was your attention directed some way to Bath?
A We saw the smoke.
Q You saw the smoke of some buildings burning?
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A We thought it was, we saw black smoke roll out.
Q What did you do then?
A We got in the car and came over.
Q And when you came over toward Bath you would come down the Gunnisonville Road?
A Aha.
Q Do you know Andrew Kehoe?
A No.
Q You know now where his farm was located?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you come past that farm?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you stop there.
A I did.
Q Did you see anybody around the buildings when you stopped there?
A Nobody around the building, they was all out in the road.
Q Did you have some talk with someone there?
A I was talking with a lady there.
Q Do you know Who that lady was?
A No, I had never seen her that I positively know of before.
Q How would you describe her?
A She was quite a stout lady, gray hair, quite a heavy-set lady.
Q A young woman or not?
A No, she was quite an oldish lady.
Q Do you know Mrs. Sidney J. Howell?
A No.
Q She lived near there. She says she was down around the farm that morning, and climbed over some fences. Did you see her climb over some fences?
A I helped her climb over some fences.
Q Was that shortly after you got there?
A Yes.
Q Did you have some talk with her?
(158)

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A I talked with her a little bit.
Q What did she say to you?
A I first asked her what caused the buildings to burn, and she said a carbide plant blew up, and I asked her where the carbide plant was, and she said it was in the cellar in the house, so I said that seems strange, they told me the tool shed blew up first, and well she says they kept gasoline in there, the gasoline exploded.
Q Go ahead and tell Wht else was said?
A She seemed to act as though she was worrying that somebody or something was burning up somewhere in the fire, and I couldn't make out what it was, and my man said perhaps there is stock in the barn she is trying to tell you about, and I asked if there was stock in the barn that was burning, and she said no, she didn't think they had any, and I said do you think the man of the place is in the place and didn't get out, and she said no, he got out and went in his car for help, and she said if I could got over the fences I would look for myself, and I said I will help you over, so I got down and helped her over, and I saw her getting over the next fence, and when I got in the car to start for Bath she was over in the lot east of that, coming back towards the road.
Q And that would be the east of the house?
A That was all east of the house.
Q Did you see Mrs. Howell this morning here?
A I saw a lady that is the same one I saw out there.
Q The lady that came in here and testified?
A Yes.
Q You think she is the same lady you saw out there?
A Yes.
Q You didn't see any other lady around there?
A No.
Q Did you come down to Bath that morning?
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A I did.
Q And came to the school?
A I did.
Q There is some testimony here about two explosions. Were you at the school before the second explosion or not?
A No, it was when we came up to the school, the wrecked cars was in the road there, that was the first thing I noticed.
Q Did you hear any explosion while you were at Kehoe's farm?
A I did.
Q Where was that explosion?
A Up to Bath there was one. and there was two in the house.
Q You heard two explosions in the house?
A I did.
Q And you heard one up at Bath?
A Yes, sir.
Q How long do you think it was after you saw these buildings burning that you heard this explosion at Bath?
A I had just got there, and I hadn't stopped the car even and I heard an explosion in the house, and I drove down east along the fence and stopped, and I hadn't been there more than two or three minutes before we heard the explosion up here.
Q What would be your judgment on how long it was after you saw the buildings burning before you heard this other explosion up town?
A Why, I don't imagine I was more than 10 minutes driving over.
Q When you got up here you saw these wrecked cars?
A Aha.
Q Did you assist in the school there getting children out?
A I worked there until about noon.
Q And you saw the wrecked school building and the condition that existed?
A I did.
(160)

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Q Outside of that, do you know anything more about this matter in any way?
A Not anything.
Q You don't live in this neighborhood, and you don't' know many people over here?
A No, I don't.
MR. SEARL: That is all. Pardon me gentlemen, did you have any questions you wanted to ask? That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

FRED KRULL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Krull you work for Herbert Fizzell?
A I do.
Q And live with him on his farm near Gunnisonville?
A Yes.
Q Were you with him this morning on the 18th of May when he came down to the Kehoe farm?
A I was.
Q He says at that time you were both working on a fence on his farm, and noticed some smoke over here?
A We did.
Q Who noticed that first, you or he?
A I don't know.
Q And you came down in the car?
A Yes.
Q Tell what you know about this woman, Mrs. Howell, and any conversation you had with her when you came down to the Kehoe farm?
A I just heard what she said to Mr. Fizzell. When he talked with her, she wanted to get around the little buildings there and get
(161)

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over the fence, and he helped her over the fence, and that is about all I heard or saw there.
Q Did she talk about being afraid somebody was in the fire?
A She talked as if she thought somebody was in the fire.
Q You say he helped her over the fence?
A Yes.
Q And you saw her climb over another one?
A Yes.
Q And then where did she go?
A She went over the second one, and I saw here start back.
4 Did she come to the road?
A She was coming towards the road.
Q How did she look and how was she dressed?
A She had on a gingham dress and straw hat.
Q How old a woman was she?
A She was a elderly lady, her hair was gray.
Q Was she quite fleshy?
A Yes, quite fleshy.
Q You never knew Mrs. Kehoe?
A No, I didn't.
Q And you didn't know any people in this community before that?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see any other women around there, I mean in around the buildings, inside the fences?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you go around the buildings?
A I didn't.
Q You and Mr. Fizzell came down to Bath?
A Yes.
Q Did you go around the buildings on your way back?
A No, I didn't.
Q You didn't stop there?
A No.
(162)

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Q Do you know anything more about it?
A Nothing, only I came up to the school and helped here until Mr. Fizzell went home.
MR. SEARL: That is all.
          (Recess)
-----oooOOOooo-----

ARTHUR WOODMAN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your full name is Arthur Woodman?
A Yes, sir.
Q And how old are you, Arthur?
A Seventeen.
Q Are you in school here, have you been in school?
A Yes, sir, three years.
Q What were you this year, Junior or Senior?
A Senior.
Q On this morning of the 18th were you up around the school building?
A I was in the school building until the last toll rang.
Q Then where did you go?
A Outdoors to play ball.
Q Who were there?
A Donald Ewing, Charley Havelin, and William Robb and I.
Q One of those boys is here?
A I don't see him, no.
Q After school called you four boys were out in front and played ball?
A Yes.
Q Where were you playing ball?
A In the middle of the road. I was catching, and the other three
(163)

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pitched to me. I was about 20 feet the other side of that cross-road, and Charley throwed me a high one and I was chasing that up by that house.
Q The first house south of the schoolhouse on the east side of the road?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then you heard that explosion while you were chasing that?
A It kind of knocked me down, and when I looked up it was going in like that (indicating).
Q You saw the roof falling in?
A The roof was caving in on top of the children.
Q You saw children in there?
A I saw the children in there.
Q You saw some climb on the roof?
A I didn't see any climb on the roof. The first thing I done was to go after a ladder after I ran around the schoolhouse.
Q You did run around in back of the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q Did you see these other boys?
A They were on the south side where they had been pitching to me, on the other side of the schoolhouse. I didn't see them until after the wreckage was cleared.
Q Where did you go to get a ladder?
A Willitt Whitney, I think he was painting, and we put his ladder in the car and drove up to the schoolhouse.
Q Where did you go after the ladder from the schoolhouse?
A About a block and a half.
Q And you put a ladder on the schoolhouse?
A Yes, and got some of the girls and boys out.
Q What did you do then?
A There was one girl that couldn't find her brother, and she wanted me to bring her down town to help find her father.
Q Who was that?
(164)

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A The Sage girl.
Q Where did you go then?
A I went back to the schoolhouse.
Q Where were you when the second explosion took place?
A In the front of Frank Smith's house.
Q On your way back to the schoolhouse?
A Yes. I stood right in front of Mr. Huggett when it exploded.
Q During any time did you see Mr. Huyck?
A When I was going down town with Mary Sage he was at the telephone office, he and Mr. Huggett.
Q Did you have any talk with him?
A I don't believe I said a word to him.
Q How long do you think it was between the first and second explosion?
A I don't believe it could have been more than twenty minutes.
Q Do you think it was about 20 minutes?
A Yes.
Q Did you se any of those people out in front, Nelson McFarren and Glenn Smith?
A I saw them when they came up, but I didn't see them afterwards until they was dead.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A I saw what they said was Mr. Huyck.
Q You know he was identified as Mr. Huyck?
A That is what they said, I didn't go and look at him, they had him covered up.
Q Did you se Andrew Kehoe there that morning?
A Not that I know of. There was a lot of cars came up.
Q There was a lot of cars came up and parked?
A Yes, until they stopped them. They had men out in front stopping them.
Q When was that?
A After the first explosion and after the second.
(165)

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Q How soon did they stop the cars from coming in there after the explosion?
A Right away. They stopped them down town so they would have room for the ambulances.
Q The ambulances or doctors hadn't got there before the second explosion took place?
A No, they hadn't got there.
Q Had they came a few minutes later?
A Yes.
Q How long after that?
A Not over ten minutes after the second explosion.
Q After the second explosion what did you do?
A Well, there was an auto George Barrett drove in town, a Durant Touring, and we drove it in front of Frank Smith's and we got two children and took them to Lansing to the hospital.
Q Did you hear any talk around there about this being a set job of dynamite?
A While I stood beside Mr. Huggett a man came up and said it was a set job. Everyone was talking around, everyone thought it was a set job though. When the first explosion took place we thought it was the house next door, and then we heard the car, and they said if they know whose car it was they would know who set it.
Q Did you hear talk of dynamite around there?
A Yes. Everyone seemed to think it was dynamite, because it sounded like dynamite, and they didn't see any fire.
Q Did you hear Kehoe's name mentioned?
A Everyone was mentioning his name as soon as it got noised around.
Q You don't know who said that?
A No.
Q Did you hear somebody tell Huggett that it was a set job?
A Yess sir.
Q Did you hear somebody tell him to go back?
(166)

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A  « response missing from original copy of the transcript » 
Q And that they got Huyck and they will get you?
A Yes, that is what they said. They said they got Huyck and they will got you too.
Q Do you know anything more about this?
A Not of any consequence I guess, no.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you gentlemen have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

BYRON ROBSON,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Byron Robson.
Q Do you live here in town?
A No, out in the country about three miles.
Q And how old are you?
A Seventeen.
Q Are you a Senior in school?
A Yes, sir.
Q And this morning of the 18th were you at school?
A Yes, sir.
Q Whereabouts in the schoool were you?
A I was going down in the hall to the east, and the stairs turn to the west, and I was right where you turn when it blew up.
Q You were right where the stairs turn, on the Landing there?
A Yes.
Q About what time was that, do you know?
A I should think it was about 8:45 Central Standard Time.
Q And when this explosion occurred what happened?
A Well, there was a crash and an awful noise is all that I know of. But I think it was black smoke I saw seemed to be coming up
(167)

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the hall, and then it turned white. I think it was this blast. I started to go downstairs, and I changed my mind and jumped out of the window, and I had to go out to the grape vines before I could get my breath.
Q You jumped out of a window?
A Yes.
Q On the stairway?
A Yes.
Q And you run around to some grape vines in back?
A Yes.
Q And when you got out there what did you do?
A Then I turned and went around to the east side of the schoolhouse and around to the west where it caved in, and then I came around west and jumped in the window and got in the third grade room and started to pull out some of the kids.
Q The Third Grade is where?
A On the south side of the entrance.
Q And some of those children you were getting out of there were injured?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck around there?
A I think he was about the first one I saw. He was in the Assembly Room, and he got out of the window on this little lean-to and stood on there hollering to get a ladder, and somebody started for a ladder, so I went around and started to get out the kids.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck afterwards that morning?
A No, I didn't.
Q There was another explosion a little later?
A Yes.
Q About how much later was that?
A Well, I couldn't tell you exactly. It might have been thirty minutes, and again it might not.
Q During the interval between were you assisting in getting out
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those children all the time?
A Yes. I got some out, and I brought one down to Crum's and I met Cushman and we was pumping up a tire to take some of the children to their homes or to the hospital when the second explosion happened.
Q You think there was about 30 minutes between the two?
A About 30 minutes.
Q Did you se anybody out in front between the first and second explosion?
A No.
Q You didn't see Mr. Kehoe at all that morning?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck afterward?
A No.
Q Where did you go after the second explosion?
A I went up to the schoolhouse and started home to see my folks, and then we came down the road and we met this man Fritz and he wanted us to take him to the hospital or home.
Q What is Mr. Fritz' first name, do you know?
A No, I don't.
Q Do you know how he got hurt?
A He said he was sitting in his car and the car exploded and something went through under his lung. He said it was under his lung, a piece of iron or something.
Q Do you know anything more about this?
A No.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----




(169)

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MRS. LULU C. HART,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q You are the wife of David M. Hart?
A Yes, sir.
Q You live across the road from the Kehoe farm?
A Yes, sir.
Q You have known Mr. Kehoe ever since he has lived in that neighborhood?
A Yes, sir.
Q And up to some two or three years ago did you neighbor back and forth?
A Always did.
Q Did you neighbor back and forth up to the time of this occurence?
A Oh, no, I hadn't been over there, oh it was a club meeting, I can't just tell you when, a couple of years may be.
Q You knew Mrs. Kehoe did you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q She was a rather frail worman?
A She has been the last year.
Q Not very fleshy?
A No.
Q Do you know how old a lady she was?
A I don't know. I did know her age when they came there, but I would say she was around 50 years old.
Q Did she have gray hair?
A It was kind of iron gray, not very gray, it was iron gray.
Q Did you notice Mr. Kehoe wiring his buildings any?
A No, sir.
Q You weren't over around the farm at all?
A I had never been in the yard for probably two years. I could see those little white knobs, I noticed on the east end of the barn
(170)

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I could see two little white knobs like that.
Q How long before the 18th did you notice that?
A I should say two weeks.
Q Fully two weeks?
A I would say no. May be I am wrong. I saw those two little white knobs, and we did too see the wires when we were going down the road.
Q How long would that be before the explosion?
A May be two weeks.
Q Did you see where the wires went?
A No, sir, never paid any attention.
Q You never saw him out there in the daytime working on wires?
A No. I would see him when he would drive in. He would always drive in to the hog-house and back to the hog-house, and his car would be to the hog-house so much.
Q Where would the hog-house be?
A Kind of northeast of the barn.
Q Between the house and the barn?
A Yes, but a little further east.
Q And didn't he use that for a tool shed?
A Yes, sir.
Q You saw him back up with his truck there?
A Yes, always back up there.
Q Did you see him have anything in his truck?
A Yes, like boxes, with a blanket over it.
Q Did you see him take those boxes out?
A No, when he got back there it would be out of sight.
Q When did you see him do that?
A The last two or three week he would be doing it every day.
Q When he drove in where did he come from?
A Always west practically.
Q Did you ever set him back his car up to this hog-house and load things in and go away?
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A We saw him with a load and it looked like old wheels and junk like that, and I said to Mr. Hart, "You don't suppose he is junking his tools." It looked like junk.
Q Did you see wire?
A No. It looked like wheels, and I know one Of the neighbors spoke about he must be junking his tools.
Q You knew about Mrs. Kehoe being away from home most of the winter?
A Oh, sure I did. Sure I did.
Q Was she home a little while this Spring?
A Town meeting time she was at home a while, and they had a girl two or three weeks, and she was down here to Bath and voted.
Q And she went back to the hospital?
A She went back to the hospital on Tuesday, or Wednesday, or Thursday shortly after that.
Q After Town Meeting?
A She went right that day, the girl went that day, and I can't say what day after that we heard she went. I didn't see her go.
Q Town Meeting was on Monday.
A Yes, sir.
Q And it came on the 4th of April this year, or don't you remember?
A I don't remember.
Q It would be the first Monday in April?
A Yes, sure.
Q You think she went away either Tuesday or Wednesday that week?
A Somewhere. I think you will find she went right in in a day or two, two or three days.
Q Did you ever see her come back home after that?
A No, but this Monday when he drove in there was somebody in the machine, because he cut across the yard, and he told Mr. Hart she was coming home, and I saw there was two in the machine.
Q Did you see a woman get out?
A No, I couldn't even tell there was a woman in there.
(172)

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Q Did you hear her talk over the telephone the next day?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see her around the house?
A No, never saw her at all.
Q Did you hear him talk over the telephone?
A Oh, I heard their phone ring. They have had hardly any rings because she was away, and I don't remember whether I heard it or not. I beg your pardon, he did talk over the telephone Monday night with Blanche Hart.
Q Did you hear what he said?
A She asked him how Mrs. Kehoe was, and he said "She is getting along fine, I have got her home here with me, and she is fussing around."
Q Did you hear anything else?
A Not a word. They had had all their conversation. Ross Hart would know what she went and called him for, I don't know.
Q This morning of the 18th did you see Mr. Kehoe around there?
A Yes, I saw him walking around, and the car was backed up to the hog-house again, and the big doors open, all open. My chicken house, I would go out there, and I saw him around there.
Q What time in the morning did you see him around there?
A Around seven, eight or nine o'clock. I stood right in the front yard when he drove away.
Q Did you see him load anything in the truck?
A No, sir. I never paid any attention.
Q Did you see him come down town. You saw him drive away when the buildings were burning?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see him come down town earlier in the morning?
A No, sir.
Q How long before you saw the buildings burning did you see him back his truck up?
A I didn't see him, I just saw it was backed up to the hog-house.
(173)

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Q How long before the buildings caught fire?
A May be an hour. I don't know positive. I didn't think anything about it, and didn't pay enough attention to it.
Q Did you see these buildings on fire and hear this explosion?
A I was right out in this little brooder house. I thought something had struck the building, and I went out to see if I could see anything around my little chicken coop, and I didn't see anything, and I picked up water dishes and came out kind of in front of the windmill, and I heard like a gun, but he was always shooting so much, and I just turned around and looked, and I won't say whether I stood longer than usual, and the first I saw was some smoke right around the roof of the corn-crib, and I saw that smoke and I stood and watched it, and just in a minute the flames from this corn-crib I saw, and I tried to make Mr. Hart hear and he was shelling corn, and I ran in and gave the alarm that Mr. Kehoe's corn-crib was on fire, and I called Mr. Hart and he started to run, and at that time the barn and everything was a mass of flames, and I said "Don't go over, because he certainly set it himself."
Q Had you heard at this thing about the schoolhouse being blowed up?
A No, not a thing.
Q Did you go over to the Kehoe place?
A No, sir, I kept right in my own yard.
Q Did your husband go over there?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see Mrs. Howell down there that day? Mrs. Howell said she was down there looking for her husband.
A I don't' believe. I saw Mr. Howell and the two boys come down and go into the place and went to the car, and he must have said something because they just went flying like down the yard by the fences, I saw them go.
Q You saw them running out of the yard toward the road?
(174)

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A Yes, I did, but I can't remember seeing Mrs. Howell there at all.
Q Did they talk with Mr. Kehoe long?
A No, no.
Q Do you know wbat he said to them?
A Not at all, only what Mr. Howell told me.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe walking around his car at that time?
A No. The smoke was so dense from the house you couldn't see very plain.
Q Did you see Kehoe drive away in his car?
A Yes, sir.
Q How soon after that talk with the Howells?
A There was two other men came along just as he was driving out of his driveway into the road, and they came over into our yard.
Q Who was that?
A I think one was the man that lived up in the little house.
Q What little house?
A The little house over south of us. I think his name was Croyer.
Q And which way did Mr. Kehoe turn when he came out of his yard?
A Came toward us, went east.
Q And did you hear any explosions over at Kehoe's house?
A Yes, which would bang about like a gun, or a little harder, heard ever so many of those.
Q Did you see anybody go in the house and try to bring out some furniture?
A They did.
Q Do you know who they were?
A I think Mr. George Hall was one of them, and I think Mr. William Horning, both of them went in and got out stuff. In fact, they told me they did.
Q Did you see some stuff taken out of the house?
A Yes, sir. That was taken into our barn.
Q When was it taken into your barn?
(175)

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A That afternoon, a cousin of Mrs. Kehoes asked if they could put it into our barn.
Q Did you come down to the schoolhouse that day?
A Ten or fifteen minutes is all, in the afternoon.
Q Did you hear the last explosion?
A We heard and saw the smoke.
Q How long do you think that was after the first one?
A I think half hour. You know you are excited, I couldn't say.
Q The buildings burned very quickly?
A Yes, because everything was open.
Q They broke out all over?
A Yes.
Q Would you say one and of the barn burst into flame before the other?
A No. I saw this little blaze up at the roof of the corn-crib first.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe run from the house out in back, or anything.
A No, no, I didn't.
Q Did you see him get into his car?
A No, no. The smoke was so dense I didn't see him get into his car.
Q Were you around your home that night?
A The night before?
Q No, the night after the fire, Wednesday night?
A Oh, yes, I waa home all the while.
Q Did you go home that night?
A Yes.
Q Did you sleep?
A Sure, I did. I thought he was dead.
Q Mr. Kehoe was dead?
A That is what they said. We didn't go to bed until three o'clock because their people were out there.
(176)

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Q Out to Kehoe's farm?
A No, to our place. Her sister was there.
Q Did you see this body of Mrs. Kehoe after it was found?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see her people afterwards?
A Oh, yes. Their sisters were at our place the next day.
Q Did they identify the body as hers?
A I don't believe the sisters saw it. I don't believe they let her see it. I don't think they saw it, now I wouldn't say.
Q They were looking for her in Jackson?
A Yes, sir.
Q You understand that Mr. Kehoe had told them that she was in Lansing?
A It was Elizabeth Genevieve Price told me, and I said they certainly must know where she is, or those girls would be out there. And they said on Tuesday she came home on Monday night, On Tuesday toward night they tried to got her, and they couldn't got any response, and finally -- they told what time, I wouldn't try to tell you that -- he called them and he says, "I thought you had probably been trying to get us, but I took Nellie -- I don't know who --
Q Somebody in Jackson?
A Somebody in Jackson. And as soon as they heard this they went to Jackson and looked up all these people. And this -- some Mr. Dunnebacke and those that were there in the afternoon and two sisters came to our place.
Q And they were there during the night?
A Yes, it was midnight, I am positive, when they were to our place.
Q You didn't see any fire around Kehoe's place that night except the remains of the buildings?
A No, no.
Q There wasn't, any fire there, or you would have seen it?
A No. I didn't see any fire.
(177)

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Q If there had been a fire, it would have attracted your attention?
A It seems as if it would, we were right there in the front room. Of course, there was people there, driving in and out all night. I didn't see any fire. The men that found the body thought we might be kind of nervous. Some of them thought the body was placed there Wednesday night, and he came over Thursday night and said he thought he would come over, he heard I was sick, and thought that he would relieve my mind, this Roy Cole and this other man.
Q What did they tell you?
A That the sand was still fresh on the wheels, and this body was certainly placed there that night. He said he went around one way and the other man the other. He didn't see it at all, but the other one did. He said there was a pickle fork laid up on her body, and it was ten or twelve feet from the building, and the body was burnt.
Q No question in his mind but what the body was there the day before?
A The day before. That is what he done it for, so we wouldn't think there was anybody else around there.
Q Have you any idea there was anybody else around there but Kehoe?
A No. Because if I did, I couldn't go to bed. No, I don't think there was a person implicated in it, really and truly I don't.
Q Did you ever see anybody come there, be around Kehoe's much?
A No, there was never anyone there.
Q Was he a man that had many friends in the community?
A He did for a while, but after he got on the School Board he went to quarreling and fighting, and people kind of set down on him.
Q After that he didn't have many friends?
A No, not many; but they were people that never entertained at dinners and like that.
Q They didn't?
A No.
Q And was she away from home before this last winter?
(178)

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A No, never away from home.
Q She wasn't?
A No.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you gentlemen have something.

-----oooOOOooo-----

DAVID M. HART,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Hart, you live right across the road from Mr. Kehoe's don't you?
A I do.
Q How old a man are you?
A Fifty-nine.
Q And how long have you lived there?
A Twenty-nine years.
Q Before that did you live in this community?
A I did, half mile east of Bath, all my life lived right around here, born here.
Q Did you know Lawrence Price when he owned this Kehoe farm?
A Very well.
Q And you knew of his building those buildings there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Lawrence Price was a man of considerable means?
A Very nice man, wealthy man.
Q You knew Mrs. Kehoe?
A You bet I did.
Q What was her first name?
A Nellie.
Q Did you know her when she was a child?
A No, I wasn't acquainted.
(179)

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Q Did you get acquainted with her when she came back there with Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q And that was about eight years ago, wasn't it?
A Yes, sir.
Q She was a rather slender woman wasn't she?
A Just a medium size I would say.
Q She wasn't fleshy any?
A No.
Q During the time that you lived across the road from the Kehoes did you neighbor back and forth with them?
A We did.
Q Were they neighborly?
A They were just fairly neighborly.
Q Did you have some trouble with Mr. Kehoe one time?
A Never had a word with him in my life.
Q Did you exchange work?
A I helped him thresh the 1ast he ever threshed.
Q When was that?
A A year ago last fall. He didn't this last Fall.
Q He didn't thresh anything in 1926?
A No.
Q Did he harvest anything at all last year?
A Hay was all.
Q And his beans and corn is still standing in the field there?
A Yes.
Q Do you know of some trouble between him and his wife?
A Never heard a word.
Q Did you ever hear that he had any trouble with the School Board?
A Yes, I heard it.
Q Did you talk with him about it?
A He use to when he first went on.
Q When he first went on the School Board?
(180)

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A Yes.
Q He explained about that?
A Some. He said he couldn't get along with Sleight very well.
Q Who was that?
A Nelson Sleight.
Q Was Sleight on the School Board?
A He was at that time.
Q He isn't now?
A No.
Q Did you know of his having trouble with other members of the School Board?
A I just heard it in a casual way.
Q During the time you lived across from him did you have some trouble with him about shooting a dog?
A No trouble, but he shot the dog. Mrs. Hart asked him if he saw our dog, and he said he shot it accidentally.
Q That didn't cause any trouble?
A No. We didn't like it.
Q Do you know of his workine horses to death?
A He told me he killed a horse.
Q Did he tell you how?
A Said the horse couldn't draw the manure, and after he was done he was dead.
Q It was about four years ago he shot the dog?
A About four years ago. We have always had lots of dogs.
Q You have always been over around his place?
A I was there last Monday afternoon, the Monday before the explosion.
Q What was the occasion that you were over there?
A I went over to help him sell some horses.
Q Who was that?
A Seymour Champion.
Q He lives in Lansing?
(181)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Mr. Kehoe had two horses on the farm at that time?
A Yes, sir.
Q No other stock?
A No.
Q When you went there Mr. Kehoe was where?
A In the henhouse.
Q That is the only building left?
A Yes.
Q Did he make any objection to your going in?
A We didn't go in, he came out to meet us.
Q Did he act like he didn't want you to go in there?
A No, we didn't get a chance, and I told Mr. Champion he would sell the gray horse, and I introduced him and asked him how Mrs. Kehoe was, and he said she was better and she was up to her sisters.
Q Did youL see him carry straw in the henhouse?
A No. I told the man I didn't think he was home, and he said he was because he saw him carrying straw in the henhouse. The man came into the house to wash his hands.
Q What did he say about the horses?
A He said he would take $100, and that she was 18 yeurs old, and we went out and looked at the other, and he said she weighed 1900 but she had one eye out. The man saih he wouldn't give that.
Q Did he act the same usual?
A Yes, sir.
Q He always spoke to you?
A He always lifted up his hand when I saw him along the road.
Q Did you see anything about him Monday to indicate he was insane?
A I never saw a saner man.
Q You think he was absolutely sane?
A I think he was.
Q Did you ever see the wires around the house?
(182)

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A I saw them that day. This man asked what he would take for the horse, and he told me "I would give him $60.00," and he said he is a funny man, but 18 years old, he is too dear, We stood around there perhaps half an hour.
Q Did you notice these wires running from the house to the barn?
A I noticed the wires to that little building.
Q Were there two wires?
A Two little fine wires, they weren't electric wires because they were too fine.
Q Did they look like copper wires?
A Yes.
Q Did you see the little knobs?
A Yes.
Q How long ago did you see them?
A Two weeks before I think I said to Mrs. Hart, "I'll bet that man i going to invent something," and she said, "Invent nothing."
Q You had talked with your wife about those white knobs?
A Yes, sir.
Q So you paid particular attention on that day you were over there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Trying to find out what it was?
A Yes.
Q Did you ask him anything about the wiring?
A No.
Q He never made any statement about the wire?
A No.
Q The Consumers Power Company was getting ready to come in here with electricity?
A Yes.
Q Did you think he was getting ready for that?
A No, because my son lives up west, and he saw him down town, and he asked him if he would take it on if they came down that way,
(183)

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and he said no.
Q Did you notice these wires running from one barn to another?
A I saw two wires run over to this chicken coop mostly, and I saw some wires run over to the big long what-do-you-call-it.
Q The tool shed?
A Yes, the tool shed.
Q The farthest building to the west?
A Yes.
Q And did you see him drive in and out of his place with his truck with loads in it of some kind?
A Yes, small loads.
Q When was that?
A Ever since he got it, but lately it seemed more often because he wasn't working.
Q He got his car about a year ago?
A About the 22nd of February a year ago?
Q 1926?
A Yes.
Q How long, in months, going back, do you think he has been drawing quite a lot?
A I think he has been more busy the last three weeks.
Q The last three weeks before the explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q You think he was doing a lot with the truck?
A Yes. He was getting his meals in town they told me, and he was to the hospital to see his wife, so he was in and out considerable.
Q Around Town Meeting day in April did you notice him bringing things in this truck?
A Yes, just small boxes, something covered up. I can't say as I saw boxes, but it looked as if something was in the truck.
Q Did you see him drive to the shop?
A Yes, and stand there a little while, and at night he would drive
(184)

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right straight west and put it into his garage.
Q Would his truck be empty when he put it into his garage?
A I couldn't say. We always could tell when Mr. Kehoe was away, because when he went away he left it open and when he was home he kept it shut, and that door faced us.
Q when he came with these boxes, or whatever he had in his car, where did he come from?
A From the west mostly. Sometimes he would pull in in the night, sometimes look out there at eight or nine o'clock and see him drive right in.
Q Did you ever see him drive out of his yard in the night-time?
A Several times.
Q Where would he go?
A I have seen him drive late at night.
Q How late at night?
A Eight or nine o'clock. We would be going to bed, and sometimes see his machine going out, and sometimes see his machine going in. My son said one night he was coming from church, and he followed his machine right home from church.
Q When was that?
A Within the last two weeks.
Q Within the last two weeks?
A Yes, he followed his machine right home.
Q Would you hear his machine going away at night?
A Yes.
Q When would that be?
A During the last of March and April.
Q You would hear him going at night?
A Quite a lot at night. Sometimes when he would go his lights would reflect out, we slept on the northeast side, so we have a chance to look out there a good deal.
Q Could you tell whether he was going toward Bath?
A He went east mostly.
(185)

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Q Went east and came from the east?
A Yes.
Q Did you talk With him about what he was doing?
A Never said nothing.
Q This morning of the 18th did you see him around at all?
A I didn't see him that morning. I saw him Tuesday. He passed me on a load of hay. I was going to my son's.
Q You were on the load of hay?
A Yes.
Q That would be 80 rods west of you?
A Yes, right after diner.
Q Did he speak to you then?
A He honked his horn and threw up his hand. That was the last time I saw him.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe around?
A Not since Town Meeting.
Q You saw her at Town Meeting?
A Somebody said she was there.
Q Where were you when this explosion took place?
A In the granary.
Q That is east of your house?
A East of my house.
Q Where did the explosion come from?
A I thought it came from the east, that was the last one I heard.
Q What did you do when you heard that?
A I kept right on shelling corn. I said somebody is blasting, I said that is too loud for a gun, and I kept right on, and after that I heard some more explosions and then somebody called.
Q Your wife called?
A Yes.
Q And then did you go up to the house?
A Yes, and she said the buildings were afire.
Q What did she say then?
(186)

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A We talked a minute, and she said, "Don't go, because I think he set then himself because everything is burning." So I went around and got some ladders, and in a few minutes she came out of the house and said there was an explosion at the schoolhouse.
Q Did you go down to the schoolhouse?
A I did. And just before that I saw Mr. Kehoe drive out of his yard.
Q How long before this second explosion did you see him drive out of his yard?
A Might have been 15 or 20 minutes.
Q How long after Kehoe came down to Bath did you come down to Bath?
A I followed him right down with Mr. Drumheller.
Q When you got to Bath did you see Mr. Kehoe?
A I never saw him after that.
Q You didn't see him after you saw him drive out of his yard?
A No.
Q Did you see anything in his car?
A Mrs. Hart said "There he goes with something over his head."
Q What was it?
A I think it was a cloth, but she said he had something over his head.
Q Did you hear the second explosion?
A I was working in front of the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see Kehoe's car down in front of the schoolhouse?
A I didn't notice it.
Q Did you se Kehoe again?
A No.
Q How long had you been working down to the schoolhouse when you heard the second explosion?
A I think half hour.
Q You think you had been working down there half hour?
A I think I had, I couldn't tell.
(187)

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Q How long do you think it was between the first second explosion down here?
A Might have been 30 or 40 minutes, because it wasn't long after we heard the first one we came up. I couldn't say, might have longer or shorter.
Q It wasn't only a few minutes after the first before you started down here to Bath?
A Before we started right down.
Q Did you go out in front afterward?
A I was out working in front right along, and I went out in front and somebody spoke to me that was helping me. I was on this big telephone pole, and I said they have dynamite right here in Bath and there are machines on fire. I didn't go after I went out to this machine and I saw a foot laying there and I didn't know who it was.
Q Did you see Kehoe's machine?
A No, I didn't notice. I saw my machine up there, and the glass was all blown out of that.
Q Who had driven your machine?
A My son.
Q Did you afterwards see Kehoe's machine?
A No, I never saw Kehoe's machine.
Q Did you se Kehoe's body?
A No, I never saw it, just the foot.
Q That was all you saw of it?
A That is all.
Q Did you se Mr. Huyck that morning?
A Never saw Mr. Huyck.
Q Or Glenn Smith?
A No. I was working around the schoolhouse, I didn't see Glenn Smith.
Q I think that is all. Do you know anything else about this?
A No, I guess not.
(188)

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MR. SEARL: Have you gentlemen any questions? Mrs. Hart did you see something around Mr. Kehoe's head that morning?
Mrs. LULU HART: No, Mr. Hart has got that wrong. These two men that came that I told you, they was the ones that told us. One of those men said that he had something tied around his head. Mr. Drumheller might know whether it was Mr. Crosby or not.

-----oooOOOooo-----

DON EWING,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old are you Don?
A Seventeen.
Q And you were a senior in the highschool, were you not?
A Yes, sir.
Q On this morning of the explosion you were playing ball out in front?
A Yes, in the road.
Q And Arthur Woodman, William Robb and Charles Havelin were playing with you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Just tell the Jury what you saw and noticed take place that morning there from the time you got there?
A After the last bell we started playing ball. We had been playing out in front between the first and last bells, and I hadn't seen Mr. Kehoe or Mr. Huyck around that morning. And we came out and played ball, and from the time we started playing ball until the first explosion I didn't notice anything unusual going on.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe that morning at all?
A No.
Q Where were you when the first explosion took place?
(189)

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A Right out on the sidewalk, on the crosswalk in the street.
Q Which cross-walk?
A You know DeBarts house?
Q Yes. What did you do when you heard this explosion?
A Started for the schoolhouse.
Q Did it knock you down?
A I don't remember what happened. I don't remember anything only the falling of glass in the schoolhouse.
Q Did you run up to the school?
A Yes.
Q Where?
A Went up and across the sidewalk pretty near the entrance of the schoolhouse, and I started into the ruins.
Q Where did you go?
A I took one little boy out of the boards, and I fell down into a hole in the home economics room, and I climbed out in the upper hall and I think Pansy Wilson was in the door of the assembly room, and I went down around with her, and I went out and want to working in the ruins, and I wasn't out there but a few minutes. I was out looking for my mother when the second explosion came.
Q Out where?
A Just a little way from the ruins when the second explosion took place.
Q Looking for what?
A Looking for my mother.
Q How long between these two explosions?
A I wouldn't say more than 20 minutes.
Q Earl Ewing was your brother, wasn't he?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go out in front at any time?
A I wasn't just but a few feet from the ruins at any time. I guess the farthest I was from the ruins at any time was when the second explosion went off.
(190)

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Q Did you see Glenn Smith or Mr. Huyck?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck at any time?
A I saw him stop and talk to my Dad just a few minutes before the second explosion, and I saw him turn and I didn't notice where he went.
Q Did you see this Kehoe car afterwards?
A I saw what was left of it.
Q You could identify that as his car?
A Yes, by that speedometer on the left front wheel.
Q No question in your mind about it being his car?
A No, no question.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck after the explosion?
A Yes, but I couldn't identify him.
Q You couldn't identify him?
A No.
Q You didn't'see Kehoe around that morning at all?
A No.
Q You had seen him working around the schoolhouse before this?
A Yes, he has been around the schoolhouse.
Q Saw him around there last summer?
A Last Fall he dug that drain there.
Q Do you know anything else about this?
A Nothing else.
Q Have you ever been down in the basement of the school?
A Yes, quite often.
Q You were down there this Winter?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice anything unusual there?
A Nothing unusual.
Q Did you notice any wiring?
A No.
Q Did anybody call your attention to anybody breaking into the
(191)

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schoolhouse?
A No.
Q Did you know about this back door being broken?
A I knew you couldn't shut it.
Q When was the last time you were down in the basement before this explosion?
A I think it was the day before. It was raining, and I went down in the basement to dry my clothes.
Q Either Monday or Tuesday?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice anything unusal then?
A No.
Q Were you around in the furnace room?
A Just to dry my clothes.
Q You were in the engine room and furnace room?
A Yes. There was a button on the wall, and Arthur Woodman was with me, and I went in the fan room to see if that turned the fan on, but it didn't. I don't know what it was.
Q Just an ordinary light switch down in the basement?
A Yes.
Q You don't know anything more about this?
A No.
Q Did you hear anything about this being a set job?
A A set job?
Q About somebody dynamiting the schoolhouse, early in the morning after the first explosion?
A The first thing I thought of was the boilers in the cellar, and I thought also of the chemistry laboratory, and I know it wasn't the boilers from the part that was blown up; and then the only thing I could think of after the second explosion was that some car had got on fire and some gas tank had exploded.
MR. SEARL: That is all.
          (Recess)
-----oooOOOooo-----

(192)

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AFTERNOON SESSION,
1:25 P. M.

DAVID WATLING,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q You live here in Bath?
A I live two miles out.
Q In Bath Township though?
A Yes.
Q How old a man are you Mr. Watling?
A I am 57.
Q Where were you on this morning of the explosion, the 18th?
A I was right there in my own yard. My son-in-law was there with me, busy building over a little brooder chicken coop.
Q Did you hear the explosion at the schoolhouse?
A I don't think we heard anything of that at first. We didn't know when that went off.
Q Did you come up to the school?
A No, the first information we had of it, there was somebody went by in a car and he hollered and said come on the schoolhouse is afire. Of course, we hadn't seen any smoke, and we looked up and saw the smoke and we jumped right in the car and came on up. We didn't know which school it was. We kept leading to one place and then another, and as we got along to this center school I said it wasn't that.
Q When you got up here to the schoolhouse did you go around the building?
A We didn't stop when we got alongside the schoolhouse, the south end looked all right. I said that is all right, the fire is out beyond, and we went out to the buildings.
Q To Mr. Kehoe's house?
A Yes, sir.
Q On the way out to the Kehoe house did you see Mr. Kehoe or his
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car?
A No.
Q Did you talk with anybody out there?
A We didn't go very near, just near the railroad and parked. There was a couple of men there when we parked our car, and they came across the road, and we merely talked about the buildings, and they said they looked as if they were set, and I said I believed they was, and just then there was a big explosion in his house.
Q Did you come up town then?
A Not right away. My son-in-law said we will go down and help Mr. Hart save his buildings.
Q What is your son-in-law's name?
A 0scar Witchell.
Q He is the father of one of these children that were killed? A Yes, my granddaughter. Q Did you come down here? A When we were standing there I heard this big explosion, and I saw smoke in the air, and I said I guess there is something on fire there, and then somebody said the schoolhouse was on fire, and I said to my son-in-law let's go back to the schoolhouse, I am afraid the children are all killed, and then we jumped in the car.
Q Did you have some talk with Glenn Smith when you came up here?
A Not any more than I run up there and my son-in-law said hello Glenn, and I didn't say anything to him. I run right on up to the schoolhouse.
Q Did you hear anything said by Glenn Smith there?
A No.
Q Did your son-in-law?
A I don't know. It seems to me Glenn said never mind me, go an and get the children out. I wouldn't be sure whether he told my son-in-law that or somebody else.
Q Is your son John Watling?
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A Yes, sir.
Q Do you know if he said anything to Glenn Smith?
A No, I don't.
Q Do you know anything more about it than that?
A No.
Q Somebody told me that either you or your son heard Glenn Smith make a statement there. Did you hear anything more than that?
A No, sir, I don't think so. We didn't stop, we were running. I think my son-in-law just hollered, but he was quite a ways in the lead of me.
Q Do you think of anything else about it?
A No.
Q Did you know Kehoe?
A Oh, yes, I was acquainted with him.
Q Never saw anything out of the way with him in any way?
A No, no.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all.
Q Is your son here?
A I haven't seen him.

-----oooOOOooo-----

D. B. HUFFMAN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q You said your name was D. B. Huffman?
A Yes, sir.
Q You live here in Bath do you not, Mr. Huffman?
A Yes, sir.
Q You are general ticket agent down here at the depot?
A Agent.
Q You have charge of the Express Company there?
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A Yes sir.
Q What Express Company is that?
A American Railway.
Q Were you acquainted with Andrew Kehoe?
A I was.
Q How long have you known him?
A Well, practically ever since he was in town.
Q That would be about eight years.
A Just about eight years.
Q And this morning of the 18th I understand he mailed a box out there?
A Expressed a box out.
Q Can you tell us about how large a box that was?
A Well, it was about that long and about that high (indicating).
Q About 18 to 24 inches long?
A Yes.
Q And about 12 inches high?
A Yes, sir.
Q And about 12 inches the other way?
A About 12 inches the other way.
Q Did you notice there was some marking on that box about pyrotol, or dynamite, or about Dupont?
A Afterwards there was some government men down there and called me down for billing that out with that mark on it. If there were any marks on there, they were crossed off with either black chalk or a big heavy pencil, because he weighed the box and instructed me how much it weighed.
Q How much did it weigh?
A Twenty-four pounds.
Q And who was it addressed to?
A Clyde B. Smith.
Q And what town?
A Lansing.
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Q Did he tell you what was in the box?
A No, he didn't say.
Q Did he declare it in any way?
A I asked him what the valuation was, and he told me about $25.00. He hesitated, and he said, "Oh, I don't know, about $25.00."
Q Did he sent it prepaid or collect?
A Prepaid.
Q How much did he pay you?
A Paid me 51 cents express charges.
Q What time in the morning was that?
A Between 7:00 and 7:15.
Q Did you send it to Lansing?
A I had to send it north on account of no connection.
Q So your connection would be to send it to Lainsburg?
A Of course, when I load it on I don't know where they take it. They tell me sometimes they take it to Saginaw.
Q Anyway, it would go north until it meets a south-bound train, and then come back to Lansing?
A Yes, because that would be the quickest route.
Q You learned afterward it was taken to Laingsburg?
A I didn't until late in the afternoon.
Q That morning he talked with you did he seem sane and rational?
A Just the same as ordinary. He never was much of a talker. I never talked with him much. I would say he was just as he always was.
Q And that is all that you know about that box is it?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: That is all I think.

-----oooOOOooo-----



(197)

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JOSEPH H. DUNNEBACKE,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Dunnebacke, what is your full name?
A Joseph H. Dunnebacke.
Q And you are an attorney-at-law?
A Yes, sir.
Q Practicing law in Lansing?
A Yes.
Q And you knew -- did you know during his lifetime Lawrence Price?
A Yes, sir.
Q Are you related to him in any way?
A No, sir.
Q You have done some legal business for him?
A Yes. I was Mr. Price's legal advisor at Lansing since about 1902, and was named one of the executors of his will, and have been acting to such since his death.
Q When did he die?
A On February 12, 1917.
Q And who was the other executor of the Estate?
A His brother Richard Price of Jackson, and his widow Beaulah A. Price of Lansing.
Q There were three of you?
A Yes, sir.
Q And his brother and widow are still living?
A Yes, sir.
Q And all three of you still acting as executors?
A Yes, sir.
Q You probably can take this up in a better way than I can. If you will just tell this Jury in sequence the events, how long you have known Mr. Kehoe, and his relation with the Price Estate?
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A Well, they began in the Spring of 1919. Perhaps, Mr. Searl, if I may, I will preface what I am going to say with the statement of one of the things I had in mind in coming here, was to straighten out some impressions that had gotten current throughout central Michigan, and more particularly at Lansing, due to some newspaper reports about Mr. Price, one of the Executors, which are very unjust, if not libelous. For instance, I refer to the last edition of the Lansing State Journal under date of Wednesday, May 18th. In the article on the front page written by Frank S. Pritchard I find this statement, "forclosure of a mortgage on Kehoe farm by Mrs. Lawrence Price of Lansing, his wife's aunt, is believed to have crazed the man and caused him to seek revenge on the community." Further down in the statement, "Members of the Constabulary were investigating the story told by Kehoe to Mrs. Kehoe's three sisters as to having taken his wife to Jackson from the St. Lawrence Hospital in Lansing. It was suspected, however, that Kehoe's wife was taken back to the farm which he was forced to leave, and that she was blown to atoms when he dynamited the buildings." As a further statement, "There was reason to believe that the man was angered at Mrs. Kehoe's sister, Mrs. Price. Mrs. Price had instucted her attorney sometime ago to forclose the mortgage on the farm which Kehoe and his wife bought, and where they had lived." Further statement, "Mrs. Kehoe was brought to to the St.Lawrence Hospital suffering from a tubercular affliction. Kehoe called from the farmlhouse from which he was to be ejected, informed the three sisters by telephone that he planned to remove Mrs. Kehoe from St. Lawrence Hospital to friends in Jackson." There is but one deduction to be drawn from those statements, and that is that Mrs. Price, or if you will please, the Executors of the Estate had crowded Kehoe to the point where he had become desperate, with the resultant atrocious happenings.
          Now, the truth is that foreclosure proceedings were
(199)

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begun in October of last year, but there was nothing at all in the circumstances which could have had any effect on Mr. Kehoe other than anxiety about the payment of an indebtedness such as an right minded person might have about owing money. I at one time had a mortgage an my place, and I know I was anxious to have it paid up. But beyond that, there was nothing about the situation that could have prompted Mr. Kehoe to this terrible thing that occurred.
          Now, the record will bear that out. Mr. and Mrs. Kehoe came to Lansing, to Bath I should say, from Tecumseh. He had some negotiations with Mr. Richard for the purchase of the Price farm, what we know as the home eighty. Mr. Price had four 80's, cornering on each other, and one was known as the home 80. Mrs. Kehoe was a niece of Lawrence Price, and that may explain the reason why they entertained a desire to own this home 80; and my first knowledge begins with the information that they had negotiated with Mr. Richard Price and were going to buy the place for $12,000, paying $6,000 down and giving a purchase money mortgage for the remaining six. It was my information at the time that the money that Mr. Kehoe paid for the farm was money that he derived from a sale of his farm over at Tecumseh. Be that as it may, on the 27th of March, 1919, the Executors of the Estate executed a deed to him, and he in turn executed a mortgage for $6,000, the mortgage running to the Lawrence Price Estate. The note shows that he paid his first year's interest in 1920, and then he paid interest for another year in March, 1921, and that is the last money that Andrew Kehoe paid on this note and mortgage. In 1922 he wrote me a letter. If you understand, Gentlemen of the Jury, that I never addressed Andrew Kehoe on the subject of this mortgage and his indebtedness under it. He may have spoken to me once or twice about it. Such correspondence as there was is here in my file, but please understand that I never asked him about the interest or the principal, and I assume it is correct to say that neither did Mrs. Beulah
(200)

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Price or Mr. Richard Price; but under date of March 20th, 1922, Andrew sent me this letter: (Reading) I replied the very next day: (Reading) That was all there was about that interest money that year. Nothing was said about interest money in 1923. Then it went down to 1924, and I have before me a letter from Richard Price, enclosing one from Andrew Kehoe and Richard Price's answer to it, and I think, if I may, I will read those into the record: (Reading)
          Now, that is a11 the correspondence and all the conversation that was had between Andrew Kehoe and myself at least, and I am quite sure with Mr. Richard Price, and with Mrs. Beulah Price. A little later on there was some conversation relative to Mrs. Kehoe's legacy. Understand, in the will of Lawrence Price she was given $2,000. On account of the condition of the Lawrence Price estate we weren't able to make any payments to the legatees and that doesn't include the widow. Of course, until in August, 1925, which was a year later, then the Kehoe mortgage became due. At that time we paid the heirs 60% of their legacies, which would be twelve hundred dollars for Mr. Kehoe, and I wrote her a letter saying it was ready, and she and Andrew came to the office and the check was turned over to them. Nothing was said about interest or principal by them to me, and neither did I ask them for it. I was a little surprised, perhaps, that they took the check without saying anything about applying it on the mortgage. And I think another year after that, yes, in March, 1926 that would be the following Spring, we were able pay another 25% to the heirs, and that would be $500 to Mrs. Kehoe. At that time I applied that payment on the note and mortgage, and wrote Mrs. Kehoe that I was doing that, and she wrote back and said she was glad there was another payment on the legacy; told me about the work Andrew was doing on the School Board and the time he was giving to it, and that a little later on they would be in to see me about it. She
(201)

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inquired of me to know how much the indebtedness was on the mortgage. I could read all those letters to you, but they are so lengthy I won't burden the record with those letters, but they are here before me for your inspection.
          The thing run along that way until in October. Understand we were executors and trustees of the beneficiaries of this Estate. Mr. Price left perhaps half of his estate to charitable beneficiaries, hospitals, the Industrial School for boys over at Lansing, the Ingham County tuberculosis Hospital, Associated Charities, and different beneficiaries of that kind. Here was a mortgage that was five years past due. It was two years past due then, but no interest had been paid for 5-1/2 years, so the time came when we felt we should file a foreclose bill as a matter of protection to ourselves, which was done. I remember going over to St. Johns on a Saturday afternoon, and my wife accompanied me, and because it was Saturday afternoon the offices were closed. I didn't place the subpoenas in the hands of the sheriff. I did however mail them over to him on the following Monday or Tuesday, and I happened to meet that same afternoon toward evening Mrs. Elizabeth Price, who was a sister of Mrs. Kehoe, and I happened to mention to her that I had started this foreclosure suit and telling her that she wasn't to understand that we were pressing her sister or her husband. She was rather concerned about it, and I learned for the first time that Nellie Kehoe wasn't a well woman, and Mrs. Price indicated to me that the service of those subpoenas might have an injurious effect on Nellie. So I went right to the Sheriff and indeavored to get in touch with the Sheriff in St. Johns, and I kept right on until about 9:30 or 10:00, and unable to get him I telegraphed this message to the Sheriff. This is sent on the 6th or October: (Reading) "Have tried since five o'clock to reach your office by telephone. Don't serve Kehoe's summons until further instructions from me. Dunnebacke." It transpired that the summons had been placed in the hands of a Deputy and
(202)

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he had taken it over to Bath to serve it. I only give you that information, Gentlemen of the Jury, because it indicate that at no time did the executors of the Price Estate press Andrew Kehoe for his money. His wife was a niece of the Deceased, Lawrence Price; and while a foreclosure suit was instituted, there was no intention at any time to press that to the disadvantage of Mr. Kehoe or his wife. On the contrary, it was my idea, and I am sure Mr. Kehoe so understood it, that he would be given every opportunity to work out his problem by making a sale of his farm and thereby saving his equity.
          In February Mr. LaNoble, who I have reason to believe you all know, was at my office and told me about having worked up a deal whereby Andrew was to sell that farm for the same price he gave for it, $12,000. It is my recollection that was going be bought by a gentleman who was instructor at M. S. C., and who was buying really for his father. Kehoe seems to have been a little slow to take up that offer, and somewhere I got the report that the purchasers backed up on it because of the amount of tax. But be that as it may, a little later on Rex Watson came to me at Lansing -- Rex Watson is a son of Dr. Watson --, and Rex wanted to buy that farm, so I sent him to Mrs. Price's sisters to talk with them about it, because they knew Nellie better than I did. Then later on, as late as the 31st of March, Andrew was in my office and tole me about a deal he had on. It seems that some broker over there, who was going to turn in some equities in other property, and he wanted Andrew to sign up a sort of an option agreement, and Andrew wanted to know of me what I though of it. I said to him I wasn't very crazy about it, because he was taking equities in property he didn't know anything about, and secondly it was a one sided agreement that he would have to go through, but the broker wouldn't have to unless he wanted to; and he seemed to sense that, and when he left the office we seemed to be friendly.
(203)

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About two weeks after that I met him in front of the bank, and we shook hands and visited a minute, and I asked him about that last deal, and he said he thought my advice pretty good and that he declined to sign that option agreement. That was the last time I saw Andrew Kehoe alive. Whatever may have influenced Kehoe to this dastardly happening couldn't have been by reason of any fear that he was going to be dispossessed from that farm. From the beginning to the end the record is that we were patient, helpful, and I repeat again was solicitous of his comfort'and his wife's comforts, and I don't ever remember of mentioning that mortgage or the indebtedness under it.
MR. SEARL: In order to clear this up for the Jury; there is two ways of forclosing a mortgage, one at chancery and one at law. The ordinary foreclosure is a foreclosure at law whereby the farm is sold. The foreclosure you instituted was a forclosure in chancery?
A Yes, sir.
Q And under that procedure you could take a decree at any time after the service of the summons?
A Not as I remember it.
Q You couldn't sell it for six months?
A You cannot take a decree and sell it inside of six months.
Q It takes six months before you can sell the place?
A Aha.
Q You can't begin the advertising until after six months after the summons is served?
A Yes, sir.
Q So after it is advertised he still has six months to redeem?
A Yes, sir.
Q So that is about 13-1/2 months?
A Yes, sir.
Q You never took a decree?
A No.
(204)

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Q You never have done anything further with that?
A No, sir. We foreclosed in chancery because it makes it possible for a man to have an attorney in court. In this case we foreclosed in chancery because, acoording to my knowledge, it was the right thing to do.
Q Where we expect a man to redeem a place we foreclose in chancery because he may redeem in a reasonable time, and it is less expense?
A Yes, sir.
Q After the foreclosure of the mortgage there was some litigation in Probate Court about you taking that $500 out of Mrs. Kehoe's share to apply on the mortgage?
A Yes. That may throw a little light on Andrews make-up. You see this was in March that these legacies were paid. I am not sure whether they were turned over to the heirs in March, but at any rate the checks were prepared and dated the last day of March and ready for delivery so they might be included in the accounting at the end of that period. In other words, our accounting period runs from April 1st of one year to March 31st of the next year. So later on that summer when a notice was given on a hearing on that question, Mr. Price and I went over to Mason to be present at that hearing, and I was perfectly amazed when I got there to find that Andrew Kehoe and his wife was present. What is the point to it? The point is that he evidently didn't like that this money was applied on the mortgage indebtedness, and instead of making that known to us, he waited until the day of the hearing and went directly over to Mason to be present at that hearing. He didn't even inquire of us as to the time and place of the hearing. He seems to have dug that all up independently of any knowledge on our part. Now, the strange thing about that is that there was absolutely nothing that had transpired that would lead him to believe that we was unfriendly, or would not be as helpful at that time as we had at any time prior to that. And yet, he did
(205)

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make his inquiries, and went over to Mason to attend that hearing without ever indicating to us that he was at all interested in the thing. of course, there was this peculiar situation there: The farm had been deeded to Andrew alone, although the mortgage was signed by him and his wife, the legacy ran to the wife alone. If you read the correspondence here, it will indicate -- I guess one of the letters already indicated -- that that later was to be applied on the mortgage. So, in applying that payment on the mortgage there was nothing but what had been fore-shadowed in the correspondence; but he seemed not to have liked that, and at Mason Judge Searl being present with him, we talked it over and indicated to Kehoe and his Counsel that if there was any objection to that way of working it out, that it would be entirely agreeable to us, in fact, I accepted the order which corrected that application of that amount on the note.
Q Did he and his wife get the money at that time?
A Oh, yes.
Q They got their $500?
A Yes.
Q Now -- A Just a moment. Under date of August 7th I have a copy of a letter here to Honorable Kelly S. Searl, indicating that we were going to do this, and then I prepared the order and sent it to Judge MacArthur, and under date of August 25th there was this letter to Mrs. Kehoe: (Reading)
Q Did you find in your dealings with Kehoe that he was obstinate, or contrary, or seemed to let things go, made such statements as let it go to the devil, or things of that kind?
A No, I never heard him use any language that couldn't be used in the presence of women and children. He was obstinate; that is, I gathered he was.
Q In the settlement of the Estate over to Mason was he obstinate
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about that?
A Well, yes. I remember there in Judge MacArthur's office -- just what was that.
Q It won't be very material anyway.
A Anyway, I remember this: There was some question up there, and your father advised him very strongly about it, and he didn't seem to want to concede to your father's advice about it. His wife was for it, and it was a matter that Judge MacArthur and all of us seemed to think was proper, but he was obstinate to the point that he wasn't willing to adopt your father's recommendation. Now, that is an example of obstinacy as I used the term here.
Q Last Fall the insurance expired on the farm?
A I haven't any word about that.
Q Did you know the buildings weren't insured at the time of the fire?
A No, sir. I trusted him implicitly.
Q I don't know but I talked with the insurance agent the other day that Kehoe had been in and paid up the insurance, but cancelled some last winter. Did you know about that?
A No, sir. At the time we sold the farm to him, I made inquiry of the mutual companies and learned it was less expensive to transfer a certificate or policy of insurance than it would be to cancel it and renew it. I wrote him the names of the insurance companies, I think one in St. Johns and one in Hastings, and pointed out how those transfers could be made, and from that time on I never knew the insurance matter was up and but what the buildings were insured. I had confidence in his honesty, that I never questioned for a moment but what the buildings were insured.
Q You always found him honest in his accounting?
A Absolutely.
Q Have you been to the farm lately, just prior to the explosion; that is, the last two or three months?
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A No, sir, I haven't been there for two or three years. We have but one 80 over by the railroad, and he comes in every year, so I haven't been to the farms for two or three years.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe's body after it was found?
A Yes, sir.
Q Any question in your mind but it was Mrs. Kehoe?
A No question in my mind but what it was the body of a woman. Yes, I am satisfied it was Mrs. Kehoe.
Q You would identify it as Mrs. Kehoe?
A The remains were charred to the point where you couldn't identify it. Except on the hypothesis that some other woman might have been on the farm at that time, there couldn't be any question.
Q Did you check up about when Mrs. Kehoe was taken home?
A Yes, sir.
Q When did you find that to be?
A The only information I can give you is hearsay, but it is correct notwithstanding. on Wednesday of last week I heard the report of this catastrophe here by the latter part of the forenoon. In fact, I got it from the first extra that the State Journal put out. Then I went over to the Hotel Olds to be present at that special drive luncheon, and while there a doctor came in that had just come from here. It wasn't until I was down on the street, when somebody else handed me another extra, and in that extra the name of Kehoe was used. I went out to the St. Lawrence Hospital to see the Sister Superior, because it occurred to me I might drive over to Jackson and get some other nurse for her, but when I got to the office she had everything in shape, so I returned to the office and when I got there the three sisters were there, the sisters of Mrs. Kehoe, Elizabeth, Genevieve and Loretta.
Q Are they all sisters?
A Yes.
Q And they all live in Lansing?
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A And they all live in Lansing. Their parents are deceased. They have no brothers. Mr. Richard Price is trying a lawsuit, and I dare say there was no one they could get except me, and then they told me about Nellie being in St. Lawrence Hospital until two weeks ago Saturday, this last Saturday; and then she went from the hospital to their home and stayed there two weeks, Andrew coming in every few days to visit her and them, and it was on a week ago last Sunday that he was to come to Lansing and bring her to her home on the farm. You may remember that was the day it rained so, I know I drove to Detroit.
Q No question about that. He didn't bring her home on account of the rain?
A No. She expected to go home that day though. On account of the weather conditions, evidently felt less inclined to do so, and he was to come after her the next evening, and he did so. The Merrills told me he was disappointed when he learned that Nellie seemed to want to stay another day. He did come the next evening and brought her to the farm. Then on Tuesday evening they had told me they had telephoned out to see how Nellie was, and had got no response. After a little while there was a call in at their home, and it was Andrew on the telephone, and as they related to me, he said, "Have you been trying to get us on the telephone," and they said they had worried about Nellie, and he said "Nellie is over to Jackson, she was lonesome here, and we have some friends by the name of Vost who we use to know at Tecumseh, and it occurred to me to take Nellie over there because I thought it would be a good thing for her," and he said "I am to go back for her on Thursday." And about that point the conversation closed, so the question with us then was whether we would go over and get Nellie, or whether we would just await developments, but we concluded --
Q In brief you did search over at Jackson for her, and didn't find her?
A Yes. We concluded in kindness it would be best to go over and
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tell her, and we drove over there and hunted up the Vasts, and she hadn't been there.
Q Do you know of anybody that talked with her on Tuesday?
A No, sir.
Q Do you know anybody that saw her on Tuesday?
A No, sir.
Q Do you know anybody that talked with her or saw her Monday night?
A No, sir.
Q We have traced her to the home about 7:00 or 7:30 in the evening Monday night.
A That is right.
Q Can you give us the name of anybody that has seen or heard of her since then?
A No. After we came back from Jackson we started for Bath, and we drove to the homes of the three nearest neighbored. My idea being to ascertain whether anybody had seen Mrs. Kehoe in or about the premises; but no one of those neighbors could remember of having seen any signs of any woman there about the premises.
Q Have you any idea when Mrs. Kehoe was killed?
A No, I haven't.
Q From these things that you learned, have you an idea that she was alive Tuesday at all?
A No, I have nothing that I could say in reply to your question except conjecture.
Q Do you think she was alive when he was talking with her sister on the telephone?
A That to me is now still an open question. The strongest circumstance to me is the fact that this silverware and some things which apparently were close to her heart were found there beside her remains out in the field. That would indicate to me that after
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coming home the conditions there were unusual, would indicate to me that she remonstrated with Andrew, and when on learning that she couldn't dissuade him, that she attempted to make her escape from the place, and had gathered those few things that must have been dear to her heart, and that would account, to me at least, for their being near her when found.
Q Do you know how she was dressed when she left Lansing?
A No.
Q You don't know whether she had on black hose or not?
A No, I don't.
Q You did learn that she was evidently dressed at the time she was burned?
A No, I have no information about that. I saw the remains of course; but the crowd had begun to gather, and that was so distressing to me that they would stare there, gape at this form lying on theearth that all I could think of was getting some sheets to cover the body.
Q This box you spoke of, had a Macabee pin in it. Do you know whether he was a Macabee, or any of the family?
A My answer is no, that I don't have any information about it.
Q Do you have any information about Mr. Kehoe being a member of the K. C., Knights of Columbus?
A No., I know he wasn't. I would have known if he was, I am quite sure.
Q Do you know of any of Mrs. Kehoe's relatives that had died that was a member of the Knights of Columbus?
A She had a brother who died five or six years ago, something like that, but I don't know that he belonged to that order. I don't believe he did. It is possible.
Q Do You know whether or not he carried a lady's gold watch?
A No, I haven't any information about that.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all Mr. Dunnebacke unless you think of something else.
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A No.
MR. SEARL: Unless you Jurors have some questions to ask? A My purpose in considering the privilege to testify about this is that there was nothing to this foreclosure that could have caused him the slightest anxiety.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

CHARLES V. LANE,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your name is Charles V. Lane?
A Yes, sir.
Q You hold some official position with the State?
A Chief of the Fire Marshall Division, Department of Public Safety.
Q And how long have you been in that employment Mr. Lane?
A With the Department of Public Safety a little over two years, Fire Marshall Division about eleven years.
Q Now, when did you first learn of this catastrophe at Bath?
A Along about 10:10, I think, in the morning.
Q And that would be Eastern Time?
A Eastern Time.
Q 9:10 Railroad time?
A 9:10.
Q And did you come out here then?
A I did.
Q Did anybody come with you?
A No, I came alone.
Q Have you a Lieutenant Morse in your Department of Public Safety?
A Yes, in the investigation building.
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Q In the investigation of secret service?
A Yes.
Q Do you know whether he came out or not?
A Not with me, but I think a little later.
Q Mr. Kern is in your Department?
a He is in our Department. He came a little later.
Q So you were the first one out?
A The first of that three.
Q Where did you go first when you came out here?
A I passed the Kehoe farm and didn't stop there, and went direct to the schoolhouse.
Q Now, what did you find when you got to the schoolhouse?
A I readily saw there had been an explosion; in fact, that was stated over the phone, and I confined my efforts on the start to learning the cause of it, if possible. I went to the basement, and my first thoughts that it was caused by high-test gasoline, as many of our rural schools have plants using high-test gasoline, a condition which we have always considered serious; and soon found that there was nothing of that natural, and when I got outside of the building I learned of the other explosion; in fact, someone told me there was an explosion in the street.
Q Had that explosion in the street happened before you got here?
A Yes, that happened before I got here.
Q Then how did you proceed to investigate, what did you do?
A Well, I give some assistance at that time in removing two bodies from near the entrance. I wouldn't be able to tell who was with me at thes time except Assistant Chief of Police Lefke of the Lansing Fire Department. Later I gave my attention over to the removal of debris and the construction work in the building which might be subject to falling.
Q Did you sometime learn, or hear some rumor about dynamite being used?
A Yes.
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Q How soon was that after you got here?
A The first information I had of dynamite was when one of the Members of the State Police, a uniformed man, came and handed me two pounds, and he said, "I want to place this in your charge, as it was taken from a dresser drawer at the farm. That was four sticks of Hercules 40%. They were loose, no caps attached. Shortly after this a discovery was made in the basement; in fact, when I was exploring the basement I walked directly over the charge which laid on the floor, which apparently had been under the metal lath and plaster ceiling and had fallen in the coal room, which was afterwards found a few minutes afterward by somebody else. The rotation as to how those were discovered, those different charges, I wouldn't be exactly able to state, although I was there and assited in removing a large percent of it.
Q Did you then make an examination or cause an inspection of the schoolhouse to be made for dynamite?
A Yes. By tracing the wires we immediately found it, which consisted of 10 to 25 sticks in different locations, and 10 sacks of pyrotol, containing about 30 pounds per sack.
Q Have you got a diagram where those were found in the schoolhouse?
A Not at the present time. We hope to complete one.
MR. SEARL: Gentlemen of the Jury, it appears here that the State Fire Marshall in their office are preparing some blueprints which will show the exact position of this dynamite. I think we will delay that portion of in until tomorrow.
Q How much dynamite and pyrotol did you find in the building?
A Mr. Morse made a careful check the magazine at the Michigan State College this morninig, and I think about 500 pounds, but he can explain that better than I can.
Q Then did you see this examination at East Lansing afterwards?
A Yes.
Q It was taken in to East Lansing?
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A It was taken in to East Lansing on that afternoon, the caps, some ten in number, and all of the explosives, Hercules 40% and Pyrotol, formerly known as sodatol, that is the information from Mr. Trombla, which runs from 25 to 30 percent.
Q Lieutenant Morse can probably explain?
A Yes, I think he can.
Q Then sometime during the day did you go out to Mr. Kehoe's farm?
A During Wednesday?
Q Yes.
A Yes, I was there several times on Wednesday, between here and there. And conferring with the Assistant Chief of the Fire Department, Mr. Lefke, and learning that Mrs. Kehoe could not be found, through information obtained from Mrs. Hart, we supposed that the body laid on the West side of the house near the rear. In fact, she pointed to me about the location where she usually slept. We went there late in the afternoon, and discharged two chemical tanks of some 60 gallons each into this particular point, hoping to cool the ruins enough to remove the, debris and search for the body, but found it was too hot to work there at that time.
Q Did you make some search of the premises for the body?
A Yes. Everybody, of course, was looking around, and there Was some search made by some of the troopers.
Q Some of the fire was burning that night?
A Yes, in the bottom. The metals were redhot at that time.
Q You were out to the farm again the next morning?
A Yes, sir.
Q And at that time you learned the body of Mrs. Kehoe had been found?
A Yes.
Q Where did you see the body that morning?
A At the location where it was found, in the company of yourself and the coroner.
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Q Have you a map of the farm buildings?
A Yes, a sketch that was made since noon time.
Q Do you intend to make a blue print of that?
A Yes.
Q When will you have that?
A Tomorrow.
Q We will delay that. The house was located the farthest to the south?
A The house was 100 ft. from the porch to the street.
Q Then beyond the house and off to the left was this chicken coop?
A 58 ft. 10 in. from a line running parallel with the east side of the house. It was also to the east side of the barn.
Q And how far north of the house have you got that?
A North of the house, yes. 36 ft. 6 in. was the chicken coop north of the house.
Q Immediately north of the house was some kind of an ice-house built right next to the house?
A Shows a building, 35 foot of construction, which was some 8 ft. narrower than the house proper.
Q Then beyond the house what was the first building, do you know?
A Supposed to be a shop, or work shop.
Q That has been described here by the neighbors as the hog-house, later turned into a work shop?
A Yes.
Q How far north of the house was that?
A 81 ft. from the house proper.
Q It was a little bit east of the house?
A Yes, the west line of this shop was also on the east line of the house.
Q In back of that would be the barn?
A A barn.
Q The main barn, or big barn?
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A The main barn, as I understand.
Q What was the dimensions of it?
A 80 ft. north and south, and 40 east and west.
Q And off to the north west of that was a sheep barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q How large was that barn?
A 50 east and west and 30 north and south.
Q And how far was that from the big barn?
A 29 feet to the west and 26 feet to the south.
Q That is the distance between the two corners of the building?
A No, it would be less than that. We measured it in that manner, but it would be less.
Q It would be 29 feet running parallel with the sheep barn?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were there other buildings on the place?
A Corn-crib, which had about 5 ft. on the east, parallel with the east line of the sheep shed.
Q West line of the sheep shed?
A Or west line, 25 foot distance.
Q And that would be 74 ft. west of the big barn?
A Right.
Q And that was a building 20 ft. 6 in. by 30 ft. 6 in.?
A Correct.
Q The long way running north and south. And then there was a tool sbed which was almost immediately west of the tool shed or old hog house?
A It would be a little north.
Q And that was still further to the west of all the buildings?
A That was 11 feet further west of all other buildings; that is, the east line was 11 ft. further west.
Q What was the dimensions of that building?
A 95 ft. east and wast, and 23 ft. north and south.
Q In reference to those buildings, can you tell where the body of
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Mrs. Kehoe was found?
A It was 17 feet west from the north west corner of the corn-crib, and 4 ft. north.
Q What was the condition of her body when you found it that morning?
A Charred, I would say, to quite an extent, beyond recognition.
Q Did you see the remains of a hog crate there, or hog chute?
A I saw two wheels with a metal axle.
Q And you learned later from some source that had been a hog chute?
A Loading chute or loading rack, placed on these wheels for handling.
Q And where did her body lay in reference to these two wheels and the axle?
A The body lay on the southeast from the wheels and axle, the head pointing south by southeast, the left limb lying on the axle, the right limb bent backward, which had the appearance that the same could have been broken.
Q And the left limb went up over the axle?
A Yes.
Q And the toes were sort of turned?
A Yes.
Q Did you see any evidence of oil being used?
A There was a piece of 2 x 4 and an inch piece nailed onto it, which showed evidence of kerosene or light oil, that the same had been saturated.
Q Her entire body had been burned, hadn't it?
A Yes, except that apparently a portion back of the head remained intact, a small portion.
Q And that would be at the base of the head?
A At the base.
Q Of the skull. And did you see any hair there?
A Yes.
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Q And that wasn't burned?
A That wasn't burned where she laid direct against the ground.
Q Had the appearance of being smothered out?
A I should think being so close in contact with the ground.
Q Did you notice that the large toe on her left limb wasn't black, but was scorched some?
A I think I did.
Q And some of the toes on that foot were still intact?
A Yes.
Q Her left arm was gone?
A The left arm I think just below the shoulder appeared to be broken off, and there was very little to denote it was there.
Q Did you notice anything to indicate whether she had been dressed or undressed at the time?
A Yes, clothing where she was in contact with the ground, and I think there was a little fabric denoted where the limb lie against the axle.
Q Did you notice the corset stays lying across her body?
A I did, yes.
Q You made some examination of the body when it was found didn't you?
A I did, yes.
Q Before it was removed?
A Yes.
Q Did you find anything to indicate that she had been struck upon the head before the fire?
A There was a slight crack in the skull, in the forehead, although not indicating that the same had come from a blow, as there was no indentation.
Q In your experience with human bodies in fires, do you often find a crack in the skull in that manner?
A Generally do following intense heat.
Q How do you explain that?
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A It has been explained by medical authorities that the brain forms a gas which generally causes a crack or check in the skull.
Q So that might have been there and might occur without a blow upon the head of any kind?
A Yes.
Q Did you notice anything at the back of the head at the base?
A No. we didn't.
Q The body might have been cut or shot in any way and you would not have been able to discover that?
A Yes.
Q There would be no evidence left?
A No.
Q Did you find a box there beside her?
A I did.
Q What kind of a box was that?
A Light metal box 8 inches wide, foot long, and perhaps three inches in depth.
Q Did that have some things in it? Did you make an examination of the box as to its contents?
A We did, it was taken in to the office. This was examined by myself, Sergeant Carn, Lieutenant Lyle Morse, Leroy Smith, Lawrence Robertson and Rachael Moon, stenographers in the offics. This was on May 20, 1927. The box described contained a roll of what might have been currency, or possibly Liberty Bonds. By looking at them through a strong glass we could see the general engravings as is used in such, but were unable to determine or tell the denomination of any currency. In fact, we had to be very careful as if you would breath on it it would al blow away. There was also a Macabee pin in this box, a lady's gold watch, Gruen by make, with the number 1407459, Case 96852. The inner case gave name of R. S. Lockhart, Jackson, Michigan. There was also in this box a dozen teaspoons. marked with a "K" on the handle, one K. C. pin, brooch and chain, opal ring, a diamond ring, a pair of ear-rings, Ingham
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County marriage license, which was about all we were able to learn was that it was a marriage license, statements and bills from St. Lawrence Hospital and Ford Hospital of Detroit. The silverware that was taken from the body was adjacent to the head, and on the chest was 6 teaspoons, 6 large spoons, 6 tablespoons, 1 pie knife, gravy spoon. 6 forks, 1 meat fork, and soup ladle.
Q Have you those articles in your possession?
A They are in the vault in the Department of Public Safety at this time.
Q When you saw the body, you made some examination of the ground around there?
A Yes.
Q And the condition of the body and things of that kind?
A Yes, I did.
Q In your judgment how long had the body been there?
A I don't believe I would be able to answer that. Of course, we were satisfied it was there from the time of the fire.
Q You are satisfied it had been there at least 24 hours when you saw it?
A Yes, sir.
Q There wasn't anything to indicate it had been burned some place else and taken there?
A No, I would say it had been burned where it was found.
Q When the body was removed it was broken to pieces?
A Yes.
Q In the condition that you found it, do you think it could have been removed there from some place else?
A No, I don't think it could have been moved in the condition it was in.
Q Would you say it would be next to impossible to burn it any place else and move it there?
A Yes, I would say it was impossible to move it in the state it
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was in.
Q Under the condition you found it in, you would say it must have been burned right where you found it?
A Yes.
Q No question in your mind about that, is there?
A No. No question at all.
Q Did you find any indication of the body being wired to this car in any way, or to the chute?
A I did not.
Q Did you find any wire around there of any kind?
A I did not.
Q Did you find any indication of the body being tied to the chute?
A No.
Q It might have been tied and the rope burned in the fire?
A That is possible.
Q You couldn't tell?
A No. It would have been tied with rope or fabric. Wire, undoubtedly, would have remained, but fabric or rope would have been destroyed by the fire.
Q Did you notice two or three spots right under her body that wasn't burned?
A Yes.
Q What did that indicate?
A That her body laid right in contact or directly with the ground.
Q And would indicate that it had been burned right there where you found it?
A Yes.
Q Did you make any examination of the buildings on the day of the fire?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go in this chicken coop?
A Yes.
Q What did you find in the chicken coop?
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A We found wires running to the chicken coop, and also wire, I would say about 17 gauge, in pairs running from building to building, and this condition also existed at the chicken coop. There was some 6 or 7 feet of wire that ran in the chicken coop on the inside, and showed that it had been broken off just prior to my visit.
Q Did you find any straw in the chicken coop?
A Yes, there was a lot of straw in the chicken coop.
Q Where was that?
A Near the west end.
Q Did you find anything else there? Did you find a contrivance there for igniting the straw?
A No, that was taken away before our examination.
Q Do you understand Lieutenant Morse had been there before you?
A I think we were there together.
Q Did you learn there had been some contrivance in the chicken coop for igniting that straw?
A Mr. Morse did.
Q You did see the wires running between the different buildings there?
A Yes, and we also collected them. And Mr. Morse and Mr. Watkins and myself stretched them out to determine the length. They also had attached insulators, which denoted the distance between the insulators was the distance between the buildings.
Q Can you think of anything else that I haven't asked you about?
A No.
Q How late were you out here that day, did you leave here about midnight?
A I went into East Lansing, and then came back later in the evening with Mr. Trombla, and I think we was here until after midnight, somewheres around one o'clock.
Q You left about the same time I did.
A Yes, I imagine so.
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Q In your judgment, from what you found, would you say that the schoolhouse was blown up with dynamite and pyrotol?
A I would, yes.
Q No question about that?
A No question about it.
Q And that Mr. Kehoe's buildings were burned?
A Yes. From what we have already learned, I am inclined to think that possibly with the exception of the tractor, denotes a charge of explosives, and that there were perhaps other explosives which perhaps came because they came from the storage tank of gasoline machinery; but in general I think they were fired by means of electric ignition plants similar to the one found in the chicken coop.
Q Could you tell from the remains around there whether oil had been poured around these buildings?
A The only evidence of oil was at the body.
Q If there had been a large quantity of gasoline in the tool shed would that have caused the explosion out there?
A That would depend on whether the gases were able to get out of the container and be in the building, just how it happened to vaporize it.
Q Did you notice any large storage tanks, gasoline tanks?
A I did not.
Q Or any metal containers?
A There is several tanks stored aounth there which might have been gasoline. So far we haven't discovered anything that denotes an explosion from them.
Q Would the tractor, the condition that it is in, denote an explosion in it?
A Gasoline couldn't cause the breakage that occurred there. That is, the power isn't high enough from gasoline to do that.
Q You think there must have been some other explosive, dynamite or pyrotol, to blow the tractor in the shape it was in?
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A  « response missing from original copy of the transcript » 
Q You found everything on the farm when you went there destroyed except the chicken coop?
A That was the only building that remained.
Q Do you know whether or not somebody was left in charge of the farm that night?
A Not definite, although I understood that Lieutenant Lyons placed a trooper there for the night or for a portion of the night anyhow.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless you think of anything more.
A I don't think of anything at this time.
MR. SEARL: Have you gentlemen any questions.
          (Recess)
-----oooOOOooo-----

CASSIE MCFARREN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Cassie McFarren.
Q How old are you?
A Seventeen.
Q Did you go to school up here?
A Yes, sir, I was a senior.
Q You were a senior in the school?
A Yes.
Q And were you at the schoolhouse when the explosion occurred?
A Not when the first explosion occurred, I missed the bus that morning.
Q Were you there when the second explosion occurred?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you then?
A I couldn't say exactly. I was between -- I was between the first house, or between the house and the church just south of the school,
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the Methodist Church and Mr. DeBar's house.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe that morning?
A Yes, sir. I saw him drive up just before the second explosion.
Q Which way did he come from?
A From the south.
Q Did you see the car he was driving?
A Yes, sir.
Q You have seen the car he drove?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you recognized it as his car?
A I noticed Mr. Kehoe in it.
Q Did you see where he parked the car when he came up there?
A No, sir, I didn't see him park the car. All I heard was the explosion.
Q How long before the explosion did you see him?
A It was almost immediately after I saw him that I heard the explosion. It was just a case of a few minutes.
Q When he parked this car, where did you see him park it?
A I didn't see him park it.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith?
A I didn't see Glenn.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A No, I didn't see Mr. Huyck. I just came from down that way?
Q You were going the other way?
A Yes, sir.
Q At the time Mr. Kehoe drove up there, did he have anybody with him?
A There was no one in the car with Mr. Kehoe.
Q Did you notice whether he had a gun in the car, or rifle, or anything?
A I didn't notice.
Q Did you notice whether he had anything in the back end, any box or anything?
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A No, sir, I didn't notice.
Q Do you know of anyone else that noticed him drive up?
A There was a girl with me, but I don't think she noticed him.
Q Who was that girl?
A Arlene Dryer.
Q Did you hear this first explosion at the school?
A No, we didn't hear the first explosion.
Q You live out in the country?
A Yes, sir.
Q How far away are you?
A We live 2-1/2 miles in the country, but at the time of the explosion we were at Mr. Kehoe's farm, we just drove up past there and turned around.
Q Were the buildings ablaze when you got there?
A Yes, sir. My father brought me to school. We saw the smoke before we got in town, and we went out that road and when we passed the schoolhouse the schoolhouse hadn't blowed up, and we turned around in Mr. Hart's yard, and they said the schoolhouse had blowed up.
Q You are quite sure the schoolhouse hadn't blowed up when you drove by?
A I am quite sure, because he slowed up and wanted to know if I wanted to stay there or go to the fire, and I said I wanted to go to the fire.
Q You came in from the east?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did you look toward the schoolhouse?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you would have noticed if it had fallen down?
A Certainly.
Q At that time you saw a blaze out at Kehoe's?
A Yes, sir, very distinctly.
Q And how long did you notice that before you got in Bath?
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A Several minutes, because we was half mile out of town when I first noticed the smoke.
Q And then you drove out to Rounds', which would be west of Kehoe's?
A Yes, sir.
Q And the time you went by Kehoe's place the buildings were burning?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe around there any place?
A No.
Q Did you see anybody around there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Who did you see around there, or do you mean you just saw people out in front?
A They went in and carried some things from the house. They were men that had been working on the Consumers'. 'I didn't recognize anyone.
Q Then when you came back past Kehoe's you stopped at Hart's?
A We stopped in the road, and the men came from the Hart home.
Q And told you the schoolhouse had been blown up?
A Yes.
Q And then you came immediately up to the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q And that is the time when you saw Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q And then you were walking, I understand?
A Yes, we just left the car.
Q Your father wasn't with you then?
A No, he went directly to the schoolhouse.
Q And which way did you say you were walking?
A I was walking south.
Q How did you go up to the schoolhouse to walk south?
A We had driven the car up in front of the schoolhouse.
Q And was your car parked out there among these cars that were
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injured in this explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was your car injured some?
A Yes.
Q How far was your car from Mr. Kehoe's car?
A I don't know, but there was bodies near our, I didn't see who, that is what they said.
Q Did you hear any talk of Glenn Smith afterwards?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did anybody make any statement or anything about it?
A No, I don't believe I did.
Q During the time that you were going through Bath, or out to Kehoe's did you hear the explosion at the school?
A I didn't hear the explosion at the school at all, but there was explosions from the buildings.
Q Out at Kehoe's?
A Yes, sir.
Q How long do you think it was from the time you first discovered the smoke at Kehoe's until you were back up town here and heard this last explosion?
A I couldn't say.
Q Do you think it would be longer than 20 Minutes?
A It couldn't have been I don't believe.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you gentlemen have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----





(229)

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WENDELL MCFARREN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Wendell McFarren.
Q You are the father of Cassie McFarren?
A Yes, sir.
Q How old a man are you Mr. McFarren?
A Forty-four.
Q This morning of the 18th, your daughter says you brought her up to school?
A Yes, sir.
Q And what do you think about the burning of Kehoe's buildings and the explosion at the school, which one was first?
A Well, we was right over here just about on a hill about half mile from the Baptist Church east when we saw the fire and smoke. My girl said "That looks like a building," and I said "I believe it is the train." We drove right along, and I drove up to the schoolhouse and stopped.
Q Where did you go, by the front or where?
A Went by the front and stopped out in front where the sidewalk comes up to the sidewalk, and she said "Dad, I want to go to the fire with you," so we started on and went up, drove past; the shingles was flying and we didn't want to leave the car there so we drove up around and we turned right around and came back, and just got up in front as they run out from Mr. Hart's and said that the schoolhouse had blowed up.
Q Then you are quite positive that the fire at Kehoe's preceded the first explosion at the school?
A I am.
Q Because you sat in front of the schoolhouse here at the time the Kehoe buildings were burning?
(230)

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A Yes, sir.
Q And the schoolhouse was all right then?
A Yes.
Q Were the boys playing ball out in front of the schoolhouse at the time you stopped here?
A I don't know.
Q When you came back did you see Mr. Kehoe at any time?
A No, I did not.
Q You went to the school and assisted up there?
A I jumped right out of my car and started up to the school.
Q Did you afterwards learn that Kehoe parked his car somewhere near your car?
A I didn't know it. I heard the explosion and I didn't look around, there was so many explosions, and I came back after a few minutes while Glenn Smith was laying thrre on the ground -- I came back to get my car.
Q Did you have any talk with Glenn Smith?
A No, but I heard him talking.
Q What did you hear him say?
A I heard him may "Give me something quick," that is all I heard him say.
Q You didn't hear him make any explanation of how it happened?
A No. He might have said something before or after that.
Q Was your car damaged some?
A Yes.
Q Did you find any holes in it that looked like bullet holes?
A No. There was holes burned through the top, the top was all blown to pieces, and the windshield broke -- the bottom glass.
Q Then was Nelson MoFarren related to you?
A Yes, sir.
Q What relation?
A Uncle.
(231)

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Q Did you see him there?
A I saw a body laying over, they said it was Mr. Huyck, but I learned afterwards it was Uncle Nels.
Q You could recognize that body as his beyond any question?
A They said it was his, but I didn't look there was so much excitement.
Q You don't know anything more about the cause of it then what you have told us, or the sequence of events?
A That is all.
Q How long do you think after you saw the buildings burning that you heard this last explosion?
A We drove right up to the fire as quick as we could. It couldn't have been more than 10 or 15 minutes, it don't seem so.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless you men have some questions.
That is all I guess.
-----oooOOOooo-----

MRS. LEONE SMITH,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name, Mrs. Smith?
A Leone.
Q Mrs. Smith, you are the wife of Frank Smith?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you live across from the schoolhouse. I think your husband has described the location of your house?
A Yes, sir.
Q This morning of the 18th were you at home?
A No, I wasn't.
Q You work in a store?
(232)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Mr. Ewing's store?
A Yes, sir.
Q And were you working in the store then?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you heard this explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go up to the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q What occurred then when you got there?
A When I got there the schoolhouse was all down.
Q You didn't see the roof fall down?
A No.
Q It was down when you got there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck there?
A Not that time.
Q Did you go back after anything?
A I went around to see where my little boy was, and my husband and I didn't see Mr. Huyck until there were quite a few children in my house being taken care of, and he came in to see what was done for them.
Q Did they take some children in your house before you went in?
A Yes, there was some. They were carrying them in, and I said "Take them in and I will open the bed," and I opened the bed and they put them to bed.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck over there at that time?
A Not that time.
Q There was a time when he came over there?
A Yes. I can't just think how it happened I was in there; but I think I went in with them to take some child in there, and Mr. Huyck was in there, and he had hold of one of the little girls, and he said he thought she was dying, and I thought so too, and he
(233)

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asked me to open the rest of my beds, and I did.
Q Did he stay at your house then?
A I don't know how long he was there, but I went upstairs to open the beds and when I came down this other explosion occurred.
Q Have you any idea how long it was between the two explosions?
A No, I haven't.
Q During any of this time did you notice any of Mr. Kehoe's buildings burning?
A Yes. I didn't know of it until somebody told me, and I looked up there and saw those buildings burning.
Q Was that before the last explosion or not?
A Yes.
Q You didn't see Mr. Huyck go across the school yard, or anything of that kind?
A No, I didn't.
Q A little later did you go over to the school yard?
A I went just as soon as the second explosion.
Q Where did you go then?
A I went over toward the schoolhouse. I went to look for Mr. Smith, and I met him and he told me his brother Glenn had been hurt.
Q Did you see the body of Andrew Kehoe that day?
A That day I did, but not right at that time.
Q An hour or so later?
A I saw him as I was on my way back, after they had started to the hospital with Glenn.
Q Where did you see that body?
A Down in the corner of my garden.
Q That would be at the southeast corner of your lot?
A Yes.
Q And that would be just west of the road. There was a little hollow spot in there, where the body lay?
A West of the main road, yes.
Q And north of the driveway that went into somebody's garage there?
(234)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Did you stop and make some examination of that body?
A Yes.
Q Did you see a bank book there?
A Yes.
Q And a driver's license?
A Yes.
Q And did you pick them up?
A Yes, sir.
Q And what was done with those by you?
A I gave them to the Sheriff.
Q That is the Sheriff, Mr. Fox?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you look at them first?
A Yes.
Q And it was Andrew P. Kehoe's driver's license?
A Yes.
Q Do you know what age it gave?
A No, I didn,t look at anything but the names.
Q Did you look at the bank book?
A I looked at the bank book first, and I couldn't make out the name, then I looked at the driver's license.
Q You knew Mr. Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q Could you identify that body as his?
A No.
Q Not without the Driver's License?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe that morning before the explosion?
A No.
Q Did you know of his driving up there?
A No.
Q On different occasions?
(235)

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A On different occasions, yes.
Q Last summer?
A I have seen him up there at different times.
4 Did you ever see anybody up there with lights, or lights in the schoolhouse nights?
A No, I didn't, unless there was something going on there.
Q Not unless there was a meeting there?
A No.
Q You never saw any lights in there around one, two o'clock In the morning?
A No.
Q Did you ever see any automobiles drive up there in the night?
A I didn't. There might of along the road.
Q Can you think of anything else about that?
A No, I can't.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless these men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

ORVILLE KNIGHT,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Orville Knight.
Q How old are you Mr. Knight?
A Twenty years old.
Q And where do you live?
A One mile north, and one-half mile west of Bath.
Q Did you know Andrew P. Kehoe?
A Just by sight.
Q How long have you known him by sight?
A A matter of two years.
(236)

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Q So that you would recognize him when you saw him?
A Yes.
Q No question about that?
A No, sir.
Q Did you know Mr. Huyck, the Superintendent?
A Yes, sir.
Q How long have you known him?
A Six months.
Q And you would recognize him when you saw him?
A Yes, sir.
Q On the morning of this explosion where were you, at home?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did you hear this explosion at the schoolhouse?
A Well, what I took to be the explosion at the schoolhouse.
Q You heard some explosion that morning?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you come down to Bath?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you drive down?
A I rode with a boy, Alton McConnell.
Q And when you got down here to Bath had this second explosion occurred or not?
A No, sir, it hadn't.
Q What did you do when you first got here?
A I jumped out of the car and I went to the ruins and tried to assist.
Q And did you do some work up around there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, at that time there was another explosion a little later wasn't there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Between these two explosions did you see Mr. Huyck any time?
A Yes, sir.
(237)

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Q Where did you see him?
A I saw him coming from the northwest, coming down along that way diagonally.
Q That would be from over towards Mrs. Smith's house?
A Yes, from that way.
Q Where did he go when you saw him?
A He came down and went over to a Ford delivery truck.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe?
A No.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe that morning later?
Q I didn't see Andrew Kehoe.
Q Did you see anybody in that car?
A No.
Q You saw Huyck go up to this car?
A Yes.
Q Where was the car when you saw Huyck go to it?
A Right in front of the schoolhouse.
Q Parked there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Could you tell whether there was anybody in it or not?
A I couldn't tell.
Q Did you see Andrew Kahoe alive at all that morning?
A No, sir.
Q When you saw Huyck go up to this car, this Ford delivery truck, did you see him have a conversation with anybody in the car?
A I saw him talking with somebody, but I didn't know who it was at the time.
Q Was he leaning against the car?
A Yes, he had his arm up on the car.
Q How far were you from the car and Huyck at that time?
A I should imagine about 40 feet.
Q Which way?
A Northeast.
(238)

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Q Northeast? A Yes, sir.
Q And did an explosion occur at that time?
A Yes, sir.
Q That was this last explosion we have been speaking about here?
A Yes sir.
Q And when that occurred what did you see? Did that occur while you were looking right toward Mr. Huyck there?
A I just turned around, I saw Mr. Huyck, and I turned away to go back to the ruins, and I turned just as the explosion occurred.
Q What did you see when the explosion occurred?
A I saw a flash, and several cars lit up with flame. It knocked me down and dazed me for a few minutes.
Q Then what did you do?
A I got up and got in the car and drove it out of the way.
Q You got in this car you came down in?
A Yes, sir.
Q And drove it out of the way?
A Drove it out of the way, to the telephone office.
Q Had that car been damaged?
A No, sir.
Q How far was that car from where you saw Mr. Huyck?
A About 40 feet northeast of Mr. Huyck.
Q Did you know the kind of a car that Andrew Kehoe drove?
A Yes, sir.
Q Would you say that this car you saw Huyck go up to was a car like that?
A Yes, sir.
Q No question about that?
A No question.
Q Did you see the car after the explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q And would identify that as Mr Kehoe's car?
(239)

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A Yes, sir, because it had a speedometer on the left front wheel.
Q Is there any question but what that was the car you saw Mr. Huyck go up to?
A No question in my mind.
Q Have you anything else you can tell me?
A No. sir.
Q You answered about the time between the explosions, about 15 or 20 minutes?
A No, I haven't.
Q How long was it do you think?
A I should judge about 15 or 20 minutes.
Q About 15 or 20 minutes?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you have some questions gentlemen.

-----oooOOOooo-----

HOMER JENNISON,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Homer Jennison.
Q Where do you live Mr. Jennison?
A Two miles and a quarter north.
Q Were you at home when this explosion took place?
A No, sir.
Q Where were you?
A I was at the corners, the second corners this side of my place, about a mile this side.
Q And were you bringing something in to town here?
A Yes, sir.
Q What was it?
(240)

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A A load of wheat.
Q And the waggon and some horses?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Job T. Sleight that morning?
A Job Sleight -- no, sir.
Q Job Sleight, Jr.?
A Yes.
Q He is thes one I mean?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe that morning?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where did you see Andrew Kehoe?
A Well, I should imagine six or eight rods west of Sleight's house, right by that maple tree.
Q Was he driving a car then?
A Yes, sir.
Q His own car?
A Now, I don't really know his car, but he was in a Ford Roadster with a steel body, a little pick-up body as we call them.
Q Did he speak to you that morning?
A He bowed at me.
Q Did he wave his arm at you?
A I really wouldn't say, but I know he bowed his head.
Q You recognized him?
A Yes, I knew it was Mr. Kehoe.
Q Had you heard the explosion at the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q How long before?
A I heard that explosion at the corners of John McGoniagal corners, I just got on that corner when that explosion went off.
Q Would that be about 2-l/2 miles out of town?
A No, it is about a mile and a half I guess, somewhere around that.
Q You say you had driven about a mile after that before you met
(241)

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Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did your horses walk or not?
A No, I trotted my horses most of the way.
Q How long do you think it was in minutes after you heard that explosion that you saw Kehoe?
A Well, 20 minutes I would imagine, all of 20 minutes.
Q Between the time you heard that explosion and saw Kehoe?
A Yes.
Q Were you 20 minutes going that far with the horses?
A I should imagine a man with a load of wheat couldn't make that distance in any less than 20 minutes.
Q The road is kind of bad?
A Not so bad.
Q It is narrow?
A Yes.
Q You came down into Bath after you met Kehoe didn't you?
A Yes.
Q Where did you go?
A I hitched my horses to the elevator, and I run right up to the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see Kehoe again that day?
A I didn't see him alive. No,I didn't.
Q Did you see his car or the remains of his car here?
A Yes, sir.
Q You were here then when this last explosion took place?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you when that took place?
A I was about four or 6 rods to the southeast from where the car went off.
Q Did you see the cars when they went up?
A I saw all this fire in the air, and fire on the cars, and windows broke in the cars, but I don't know where the explosion was.
(242)

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Q Did you see Mr. Huyck that morning at all, or Glenn Smith?
A No, sir, I didn't.
Q When you came up there the roof had broken in?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you work around there some?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you continue to work there after the second explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear some talk about there being some dynamite around, about it being a set job?
A Yes, sir, I did.
Q Who spoke about that, do you remember?
A No, I don't, but it soeme as if everybody was talking about it.
Q How long have you known Kehoe?
A Every since he has been on this place. It seems like 8 or 9 years, but ever since he bought this place.
Q Have you ever exchanged work wtth him?
A No, sir.
Q Ever neighbored with him?
A No, sir.
Q Your families haven't neighbored back and forth?
A No, sir. I was acquainted with him, but not personally.
Q You wouldn't pass his house in coming into town?
A No, sir.
Q You came in from the north?
A Yes, sir.
Q When you came down this road by Job T. Sleight's buildings you could see Kehoe's buildings?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you notice whether they were on fire?
A They were on fire.
Q And you saw that fire up by McGonical's?
A No, I couldn't. I thought then it was somebody blasting stone,
(243)

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and I went from the corner perhaps 60 rods and I saw the black smoke, and I said Hobart's house is on fire, and then I got up farther and I saw the smoke over beyond the woods and I said to myself that is Mr. Kehoe's or Mr. Hart's, and then when I got further I saw the buildings on fire.
Q And that is practically all you know about that?
A Yes, sir. And there was several explosions over at those buildings from the time I turned that corner until I got down to Mr. Sleight's.
Q You did hear several explosions?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see anything fly after the explosions?
A No, I was too far away for that.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

TONY STAVINSKI,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your first name is Tony?
A Tony.
Q Your boy was injured in the school?
A Yes.
Q What was your boy's name that got hurt?
A Steve.
Q Steve?
A Yeah.
Q Where were you when this explosion went off -- home?
A Yes.
Q Where do you live?
A About a mile and three-quarters.
(244)

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Q And did somebody bring your boy home to you?
A Yes.
Q Did you see the boy?
A Yeah, I saw him.
Q His arm was hurt?
A This hand, and leg here on the side (indicating).
Q Did you see a piece of steel in his arm?
A I no see, I take him back for doctor.
Q Was it a bullet, do you know.
A I don't know. This boy tell me I go to the hospital he got automobile nuts.
Q Automobile nuts?
A Piece of screw.
Q Do you know whether or not that is what it was?
A No.
Q Do you know whether the boy was in the school when he got hurt, or was he outside of the building?
A Yes, he was going to school, but this explosion coming, he go out to see another boy, and play everything on the ground, about on the ground.
Q He got hurt in the second explosion then?
A I think so, in the second. Yes, he tell about the first time. I said what's the matter you stay, and he said I wanted to use my partnerr he says.
Q You don't know where he stood when he got hurt?
A I don't know.
Q Some place outside of the school?
A Yeah.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----



(245)

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MRS. MABLE ELLSWORTH,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name, Mrs. Ellsworth?
A Mable.
Q And you are Monty Ellsworth's wife?
A Yes, sir.
Q On the 18th at the time of this explosion were you at home?
A I was.
Q And you live with your husband out at the gas station?
A Yes, sir.
Q You heard the explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you, inside the building?
A I was upstairs at home. I was at the east end of the stairs.
Q Did you see the schoolbuilding fall?
A We can't see the school building, only the chimney from our place. And I run to the window when I heard it, and I said "My goodness, what was that," and he said it sounded like an explosion, and I could see the cloud of white dust like come up from the school, and we could hear the children scream, and I said, "My goodness, we must hurry," and we came right down to the school, and it was in ruins when we got here.
Q You think the explosion of the school preceded that at Mr. Kehoe's?
A I did. Just as I got to the west window the smoke had started at two different buildings, it was the large barn and the long sheep barn, and just as we drove out of the yard I looked back and the smoke started out of the roof of the house.
Q You heard about what Cassie McFarren and her father said about the School building?
A I don't understand. If the child was so excited? I tried to
(246)

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tell her, we was both down there.
Q Honest differences often occur.
A Yes. She is my sister's girl.
Q There is no question in your mind but what the explosion of the school occurred first?
A That is the way I saw it.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe that morning at all?
A No, I didn't.
Q You didn't see him go past your place at all?
A No, I didn't.
Q When you came down to the schoolhouse did you see him at all?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see his truck?
A No, because I was over working over the children that they brought out, and when the explosion occurred they said, "My goodness, look out there," and I could just see smoke and stuff come over the tops of the cars.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck out there?
A I met Mr. Huyck on the sidewalk. He was going in after more children. He was working when I first got down here.
Q Did you have any talk with him?
A No.
Q Did you see him go over to this car?
A No, I didn't.
Q Do you know anything else about this?
A No, I don't.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----




(247)

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HENRY HEILER,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Henry Heiler.
Q Where were you when this explosion took place, Mr. Heiler?
A I was up there about 80 rods, I should think, in back of the school.
Q What place would that be on, on the Ross Hart place?
A No, the one this side.
Q The place this side of the Ross Hart place?
A I could say whether Ross Hart use to own that.
Q It is a mile west of the schoolhouse?
A Yes, the place I was on is.
Q When you heard this explosion what did you do?
A I started right up there.
Q Toward the school building?
A Yes.
Q Did you look toward the west, did you notice any fire toward Mr. Kehoe's?
A No, sir, I didn't look to the west.
Q You came right up to the school?
A Yes, sir. Just as soon as I could.
Q When you got up here did you see some other people at the schoolhouse?
A I did.
Q Did you assist in getting out these children?
A Yes. I went in there and was in there quite a while.
Q While you were there this last explosion took place?
A About 20 rods from this car.
Q Do you know Mr, Huyck?
A No, sir.
(248)

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Q Did you know Mr. Kehoe?
A No, sir. I never had him pointed out.
Q How long have you lived here?
A Two years this Spring.
Q You don't know the kind of car Kehoe drove?
A Only what I heard them say.
Q Did you see a Ford pick-up there?
A I saw it after it was blown to pieces.
Q Did you see it before?
A I didn't notice it. There was lots of cars sitting there when I was going back and forth.
Q When you heard this last explosion did you turn in the direction of that explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q What did you see? A I saw Glenn Smith and Mr. McFarren laying by the cars.
Q Did you go over there?
A I went part way.
Q Did you hear Glenn Smith say anything?
A No, sir.
Q And where did you go then?
A I went back and assisted in the rescue.
Q Did you go in the schoolhouse again?
A No.
Q Did you know it was Kehoe's car?
A No, I didn't. I didn't know a car blew up. I saw something all going to pieces.
Q Do you know anything about the cause of it?
A No.
Q The sequence of events?
A See what?
Q The way the events happened?
A No, only just what I heard.
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MR. SEARL: That is all I guess, unless these men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

AARON DE BAR,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Where do you live Mr. DeBar?
A Right by the schoolhouse.
Q The; first house south of the schoolhouse?
A Yes, sir.
Q And were you at home last Wednesday morning?
A Yes, sir.
Q When this schoolhouse blew up?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you, outdoors or inside?
A I was over here on the corners helping a fellow set some fence posts, and we heard it go off and we came right up and went to taking them out.
Q How far were you from the schoolhouse when it blew up?
A About 80 oo 90 rods.
Q And you came up and helped get the children out?
A Yes, sir.
Q And the roof had caved in when you got there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck the Superintendent there?
A No, I didn't see Huyck there.
Q Did you work there until this other explosion went off?
A No, I went over to see how my house was, and it was all right until the car went up.
Q And when you were over to your house did this other explosion go and the car go up?
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A Yes.
Q How long was it after the first one?
A It wasn't very long, fifteen or twenty minutes.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe around the schoolhouse?
A I saw him coming from the schoolhouse, coming down to the car and he motioned for me to come over and I didn't go over.
Q You saw Kehoe come from the schoolhouse down to his car?
A Yes, sir.
Q You mean Andrew Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q The man that killed himself?
A Yes, sir. And he walked awful fast to get to the car too.
Q How long was that after this first explosion?
A Oh, not very long.
Q. Did you see his car out in front?
A Ha?
Q Did you see his car out in front?
A No.
Q Did you see him got into a car?
A No. I didn't go near him, he motioned for me but I didn't go.
Q He motioned for you to come over to him?
A Yeah. Often met a good deal on the school grounds.
Q He worked a good deal on the school grounds?
A I thought he was a nice man. I didn't think he would do anything like that.
Q Why didn't you go across when he motioned to you?
A The cars were on fire.
Q He didn't motion to you until after the fire at the car?
A No.
Q Do you think you could be mistaken about that?
A No.
Q Are you sure you saw him come out of the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
(251)

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Q Did you see the Superintendent?
A The Superintendent, yes.
Q The Principal, Huggett, where did you see him?
A I saw Kehoe, I saw the Superintendent in the school.
Q Huyck that is, that is the Superintendent?
A Well, I don't know what you call him.
Q You mean the Superintendent you saw come out of the school don't you?
A Aha.
Q You know Andrew Kehoe don't you?
A Yes.
Q You didn't see Kehoe come out ofthe school did you?
A No.
Q This man you saw come out Of the school was the Superintendent, wasn't it?
A Yeah.
Q Did he motion to you?
A Yes, he motioned to me to come down to the car.
Q And he was the man you mean that motioned to you to come down to the car?
A Yes.
Q You know who I mean when I say Andrew Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see him come down from the school?
A Yes, saw him come from it.
Q You mean Kehoe, that lives out here?
A Yes.
Q The man that was blown up in this explosion?
A Yes.
Q Do you hear me all right?
A Yes.
Q Well, do you know Kehoe was blown up in the explosion there in the
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cars there?
A Yes, sir.
Q He didn't motion to you after that did he?
A No.
Q Did he motion to you before that to come over?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was he in his car then?
A Yes.
Q When he motioned to you?
A Aha.
Q Didn't he motion to the Superintendent to come over?
A Yes.
Q And the Superintendant went over there after he motioned, did he?
A Aha.
Q And wasn't it the Superintendent you mentioned you saw go across the school yard?
A Yes, Kehoe.
Q The Superintendent's name is Huyck?
A Yes, I know it.
Q Wasn't it Huyck you saw go across the school yard?
A I didn't see Huyck.
Q You didn't see Huyck at all?
A No.
Q Are you sure you saw Kehoe go across there?
A Yes, all I saw was Kehoe.
Q Wasn't he in the car when you saw him, wasn't he in his automobile?
A Yes.
Q Didn't he drive up there in his automobile?
A Yes.
Q He didn't get out of his automobile?
A Yes. He drove up there and went to the schoolhouse and came back.
Q He drove up there, and then got out and went up to the school-
(253)

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house, and then came back?
A Yes, sir.
Q You saw him do that?
A Yes, sir.
Q You couldn't be mistaken about it could you Mr. DeBar?
A No, sir.
Q Do you know of anybody else that saw him?
A No, I don't.
Q Where did he go when he got out of the car and went toward the school, did he go into the building?
A Yes, sir.
Q What door did he go in?
A Why, the front door.
Q Had the building been blown up then?
A No.
Q That was in the morning early when you saw him go up there?
A Ya.
Q Was Mr. Detloff with him then?
A Ha?
Q Was Mr. Detloff with him then?
A No. there wasn't anyone with him. When he came down to the school grounds he went up there alone, and came back alone.
Q And then he drove away?
A Yes.
Q And that was before any of the explosions wasn't it?
A Yes, sir.
Q That was fairly early in the morning, about 7:30 or so?
A Yeas about nine or half past nine, or ten somewhere along there.
Q Wasn't that before you went to work?
A No.
Q Wasn't it before school started that you saw him?.
A Afterwards.
Q Afterwards?
(254)

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A Yeah.
Q How long was it before the explosion?
A Oh, not but a little while.
Q Before the first explosion -- how long had you been working over there before you heard this explosion?
A Not but a few minutes.
Q Well, didn't you see him when he came up to the schoolhouse the first thing in the morning?
A No, I did not. I seen him when he went up to the schoolhouse, and came back, and he walked awful fast from the schoolhouse down to the car.
Q There hadn't been any trouble at the schoolhouse then had there?
A I don't know. I guess there --
Q There hadn't been any explosion there?
A No.
Q Then you went to work?
A No, I didn't go back. When that explosion was at the schoolhouse I stayed up there, I didn't go back to work.
Q Well, when you first saw him in the morning you saw him going up to the schoolhouse?
A Tha was when I came up to the schoolhouse to help take them out.
Q You saw him then?
A Yes. I saw him go up to the schoolhouse, and saw him come back to the car.
Q Did he go into the schoolhouse then?
A Yes, he went in.
Q How long was he in there?
A Not but a fow minutes.
Q Then he came out?
A Yes.
Q Did he have anything with him when he came out?
A Not anything that I saw.
Q Did he get in his car?
(255)

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A Yes.
Q Did he drive away?
A No.
Q What did he do?
A He stayed right there.
Q Then what happened?
A He called up the Postmaster there and Nelson McFarren.
Q That was when the car exploded?
A Yes.
Q Didn't you see him drive up there in his car just before the Postmaster, and the Superintendent and all of them was blown up?
A I didn't see the Superintendent there.
Q Didn't you see him drive up in his car just before this last explosion?
A I didn't see him when he came in in the morning, I was down here to work.
Q After you got back there didn't you see him drive up there in his car?
A Yes, sir.
Q He got out of his car?
A Yes, and went up to the schoolhouse.
Q And went up to the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q You are sure of that. Do you know anybody else that saw him get out of his car and go up to the schoolhouse?
A No, all I saw was just him.
Q And when he went to the schoolhouse was the roof of the schoolhouse down?
A No. He went upthere and touched it off and then came back, as near as I can got at it.
Q You didn't go back home until after the explosion?
A No.
(256)

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Q There wasn't any other explosion at the schoolhouse after you got back home?
A I saw him when I went up and was helping take them out.
Q You saw that when you were taking them out of around the school?
Q There wasn't any other explosion in the schoolhouse after that?
A No. Some said they touched it off where the blower was.
Q You think he must have gone up to the schoolhouse to touch it off?
A Yes, sir.
Q And that is what makes you think he went up to the schoolhouse?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

MRS. VIRGALINE ZEEB,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name Mrs. Zeeb?
A Virgaline.
Q Your husband's name is Bernard?
A Yes.
Q You have some children, have you not Mrs. Zeeb?
A Yes, two.
Q This morning of the explosion were you near the schoolhouse?
A At the time of the second explosion.
Q Where were you when the first explosion occurred?
A Why, I don't know. I didn't hear it. I left home and we came to the fire, I and my brother-in-law and the two children, and we went over to Kehoe's to the fire, and while I was there I heard some explosions there, but they were in the house, and while we were there somebody came and said the schoolhouse had exploded, and
(257)

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we didn't believe it. We could see the roof the most of the way in, so we drove down and stopped.
Q What is your brother-in-law's name?
A Ronald.
Q Where did you park your car when you came to the schoolhouse?
A Just a little way this side. They said there were just two cars between our car and Andrew Kehoe's, but I don't know anything about it.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe there?
A No, I didn't. I was talking with some of the girls, and I went up toward the school to see if I could give any help, when I heard the second explosion.
Q Where were you from your car when the second explosion took place?
A I wes just on the sidewalk coming up toward the schoolhouse.
Q Probably a rod?
A Probably a rod, not very far.
Q Did you see Mr. Smith the Postmaster, or Mr. Huyck the Superintendent there?
A I saw Mr. Smith just before that run by on the sidewalk, and I saw Mr. Huyck a little before that, I don't know where I saw him.
Q When this explosion occurred did it knock you down?
A I don't think it knocked me down, but something hit me.
Q You were injured in the body?
A No, my hand.
Q Do you know what that was?
A No, I don't.
Q Did you go to a doctor with it?
A Yes.
Q He didn't find a bullet in there?
A No, just a little cut.
Q Then what did you do?
A Right after the explosion, the first thing I thought of was the
(258)

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children, and I turned and looked and our car was on fire, and I run and took them out of the car and carried them down the road to the other end of town to Joe Cushman's.
Q You don't know anything about what happened after that?
A No. I thought the explosion was in the schoolhouse. I wasn't thinking of anything but getting the children away.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

LODONNA RUTTER,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Lodonna Rutter.
Q How old are you?
A Fourteen.
Q Where do you live, Lodonna?
A Right next to the schoolhouse, this side.
Q First house north of the schoolhouse on this main street?
A Aha.
Q Is Ida A. Hall your grandmother?
A Yes, sir.
Q She lives there with you?
A Yes, sir.
Q How long has she lived there with you?
A Well, we moved there three weeks ago Saturday.
Q Before that where did you live?
A In Lansing, on Washington Avenue.
Q Did you go to school there?
A Yes. We moved here on Saturday and I started on Monday.
Q Were you in this school when it exploded?
(259)

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A Yes, sir.
Q What room were you in?
A In the Assembly Room.
Q Of the High-School?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, sometime before this, since you have been here the last few weeks, have you seen anybody around the schoolhouse in the night?
A I didn't see anybody around the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see a car?
A About 11:00 or 11:30 I saw a car.
Q When was that?
A About two weeks ago.
Q Did your grandmother call your attention to that?
A She showed me the light up there, I and I told her I thought it was Mr. Huyck's office.
Q You knew where Mr. Huyck's office was, where it was located in the building?
A Yes, sir.
Q And this light you saw in the building, would that be about in the location of Mr. Huyck's office?
A Yes, sir.
Q You could see that window from your house?
A Yes, sir, from the kitchen.
Q Did you notice what kind of a car that was?
A It looked like a Ford touring car. It was just the back of it we could see from the window.
Q You couldn't distinguish very clearly?
A No, sir.
Q Do you think it might be a Ford pick-up truck?
A No, it was a touring car.
Q Mr. Huyck didn't have a Ford touring car?
A No, it was a sedan.
Q You don't think this was a sedan?
(260)

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A We weren't quite sure at the time.
Q Did you see cars there at other times?
A No, I didn't see them.
Q This car set about where?
A Right at the main entrance.
Q Was it backed up against the building?
A Well, it was right acros the sidewalk.
Q Had your grandmother called your attention to cars being out there at other times?
A No, just that one.
Q Your grandmother isn't here today?
A No, she is in St. Johns.
Q Will she be here in the morning?
A We suppose she will.
Q Did you hear your grandmother tell of cars being there on other nights?
A Just that once.
Q You never saw any men around there?
A No, sir.
Q That is all you know about cars being there at night?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where was your room in the house, would you sleep so the lights on the car would wake you up when it came down there?
A No.
Q Was there any lights on this car when you saw it?
A No, sir.
Q Was it moonlight so you could see by the light of the moon?
A Yes, sir.
Q You thought that was about 11:00 or ll:30?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you say that was about two weeks ago?
A Yes.
MR. SEARL: I guess that is a all.
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A JUROR: How long was the light noticed in the office?
A I don't know just how long it was noticed.
A JUROR: I do know this, that two weeks ago this coming Wednesday night they was getting ready for a banquet, and Mr. Huyck went over here to the schoolhouse to get a pencil to mark some dishes along about that time, but he wasn't gone only about five or ten minutes from here.
          (Adjourned at 4:30 P. M.)

-----oooOOOooo-----

BATH, MICHIGAN,      
May 25, 1927,   
9:35 A. M.


MRS. IDA A.HALL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your full name is Ida A. Hall?
A Yes, sir, I am quite hard of hearing.
Q And how long have you lived in Bath?
A We moved in the first of the month.
Q That is, the first of May?
A Yes, sir.
Q Had you ever lived here before that?
A Yes, born here.
Q How long since you came back here?
A About 17 years.
Q Do you live with some of your children?
A No, I have a grandchild living with me.
Q Who is in the house with you, who lives with you?
A Lodonna Rutter, Roger Rutter and Hattie Rutter.
Q And you live the first house north of the schoolhouse on the
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main street?
A Yes sir.
Q And that is on the east side of the street?
A Yes, sir.
Q So your house is about as near to the schoolhouse as anybody's?
A I don't know as it is any nearer then Aaron DeBar's.
Q During your lifetime were you acquainted with Andrew Kehoe?
A Never saw him as I know of. I might have seen him in the street here.
Q Where did you sleep in the house?
A In the southeast bedroom.
Q Would that be downstairs?
A Yes.
Q And was there a window on the south side?
A Yes, sir.
Q During the night-time did you ever see anybody drive up around the schoolhouse?
A Yes, sir.
Q On more than one occasion?
A Yes, sir.
Q On how many times?
A About three times, as I remember now.
Q Do you remember when the first time was?
A No, sir. You see I had no suspicion, and I just seen the people go in and out, so I didn't time it. I had,lived there three or four days when I first discovered there was people going and coming in the night from the schoolhouse.
Q And how many times do you think you saw people going in there nights?
A Only one night when I really saw a man go in, when I stood there looking.
Q Was your attention called by the lights of the automobile?
A Yes, woke me up.
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Q Would that be when the lights would shine in your window?
A Yes, come from the south.
Q Would every car that come from the south, the lights shine in your window?
A Yes. You see this car, it was so light and all at once it disappeard, and I seen my throat was dry and I got up and went to the kitchen, and as I stood there getting a drink, I looked out and here was a little Ford truck.
Q What we call a Ford pick-up?
A Yes, I guess. Just a little box on the back, and it stood right close to the steps, and a little way back was a Ford touring car, and two or three weeks ago, if you remember, there was a beautiful moon, and I just stood there, looking at those beautiful trees, that was one of the reasons I was glad to get back to Bath, and I stood there looking, and I saw this man taking something and I said it was a crate of potatoes. You know if a person looks at anything they form an opinion, and my opinion was he took a crate of potatoes there and left it for some of the boys to get with a truck. It was two o'clock in the morning by my clock over on the shelf, and I looked before I went back to bed.
Q Did you see this man go in the building?
A Yes, and he came back and got another.
Q That would be in the front door?
A Yes, that would be in the front door.
Q How many times did you see him go in the building carrying something?
A Just twice.
Q Did you see more than one man at a time?
A No, I just saw one man at a time, but whether that was the same man I don't know.
Q Where did he get this box or crate?
A Out of the automobile.
Q Out of the back back of the truck?
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A Out of the back end of the truck. He stepped around as anyone would that was doing business right.
Q Could you describe the man?
A No, I couldn't, it was too far away.
Q Do you know whether he had a hat on or not?
A I don't know, I wouldn't say. I was wondering why he was carrying that bushel of potatoes in there at two o'clock in the morning, that is the truth of it.
Q And you say you saw a Ford touring car?
A Yes. The Ford touring car was here, and he was here across the sidewalk unloading (indicating).
Q The touring car would be on the south side of the sidewalk?
A Yes, on the south side of the sidewalk. The leaves weren't out so far, and I could see it wasn't right up close to the schoolhouse, it was back where I think where the first trees come.
Q How far back would that be?
A It isn't over two or three rods from the schoolhouse to the first trees.
Q How far would it be from the schoolhouse?
A I don't know, I haven't been over there.
Q What is your best opinion as to how far the car was from the school?
A I would say from the steps it wouldn't be farther than from here to the window there (indicating).
Q Sixteen or eighteen feet, may be 20?
A I presume so.
Q Was it right near this other Ford truck, or don't you know whether it was a Ford truck?
A Those little trucks, that is about al I know is the Ford.
Q You think it was a Ford pick-up?
A Yes, I think it was.
Q How far was this touring car from that?
A I don't know. Just a proper distance to drive-by.
(265)

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Q You didn't see anybody else around there, no other man?
A No, just the one man is all I saw.
Q You didn't see this man go to the Ford touring car?
A No, I just went back to bed when I saw him take that last crate.
Q Did you see anybody drive away in a car?
A No, I didn't bother my head any more about it.
Q Do you think it was three or four days after you moved in?
A I couldn't say whether it was the first or second week, but I saw him different times.
Q When did you see him besides?
A I had seen him drive in and out many times so late, and I said to my granddaughter, "I would like to know why so many rigs are going in and out of that schoolhouse so late in the night," and she looked and said "That light is in the Superintendent's office," but I said I saw the lights, but they are going in and out of there all hours of night.
Q That night you saw the touring car, was there a light in the Superintendent's office?
A No, there was no lights at all, it was all dark.
Q Did you ever see any lights down below, or in any room besides the Superintendent's office?
A I don't recall as I call to mind any.
Q Did you ever see anyone walking around there with a flashlight?
A No, I didn't.
Q The lights on these cars was always lighted?
A I don't know, the moon was so bright.
Q These other nights where you saw this car up there, did you see anybody carrying anything up there?
A No, just this one night.
Q Did you see a man around there?
A No, heard them drive in and out.
Q You never paid any attention to see whether there was more than
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one car at any other time or not?
A No. You see from my east window I could see the lights as they turned around from the schoolhouse.
Q Have you seen anybody else that saw a car in there?
A No,
Q Have you talked with anybody else?
A Not until this happened, then I said to my niece, Mrs. Cushman, I believe this accounts for those lights and their driving in and out of this schoolhouse.
Q Did she see anybody?
A No. She wanted to know if I had seen you, and I wouldn't have said that much if I knew I would have to come down here.
Q We want to get the facts?
A I know, but he is punishing himself now.
Q Do you think there was anybody else there but Mr. Kehoe?
A I wondered why they had two cars down there.
Q Did you ever hear of any of the members of the School Board going down there, or any members of tho Parent-Teachers Association going down there after nights?
A No. I know when they had their meetings.
Q There was some testimony here yesterday, at one of the Parent-Teachers meetings held down town here, Mr. Huyck went back to his office after some things?
A I don't Know that. It was 11:30 when my granddaughter came and looked out.
Q Was that the time you saw two cars around there?
A No, that wasn't the night at all.
Q That is the only time you saw a light upstairs?
A No, I saw a light upstairs at different times than that, but not downstairs.
Q Did you see lights upstairs when there was cars downstairs?
A No, not unless there was meetings there.
(267)

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Q It wasn't very often that there was anything going on at the school?
A I don't know as there was. I don't know how that was. I know the ladies came and wanted me to go to the Parent-Teachers meeting, and that is all I know. I had just moved here, and I wasn't acquainted with so very many.
Q Were you at home when that explosion took place that morning?
A Yes, I was.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe around there that morning at all?
A No, I was sick and lying on the couch when this took place, my Aunt set there with me.
Q Did she see Mr. Kehoe around there that morning?
A She didn't say, and I wouldn't know him if I saw him.
Q Where were you when this second explosion took place?
A Bless me, I guess I was sitting by my front window. The whole glass went out.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck around there?
A No. I wouldn't know Mr. Huyck.
Q You weren't acquainted with any of thode people?
A No, only with some of our folks.
A JUROR: Was that Ford touring car at the schoolhouse the next morning when you got up?
A No, it was driven away that night.
A JUROR: Were the two cars driven away about the same time?
A If it was, it was brought back after that. They went away soon after I went back to bed.
A JUROR: Did both of the cars go away at the same time?
A I don't know whether they did or not, but I seen one go out and I thought the other did.
A JUROR: Which one went out, de you know?
A No, for I didn't go out because I saw the light in my east window as it backed out, and then it went out and I could see it going south.
MR. SEARL: I guess that is all Mrs. Hall.
-----oooOOOooo-----
(268)

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ALLEN MCMULLEN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Allen McMullen.
Q How old a man are you, Mr. McMullen?
A Sixty-nine.
Q And where do you live?
A I live about two miles -- well, it isn't quite 2-1/2 miles from here.
Q Which way?
A West, and a mile north.
Q In going to your home from here would you go out the Gunnisonville Road?
A No.
Q Out past Job T. Sleight, Junior's house?
A Yes, and a little north of that corner, not quite half mile.
Q How long have you lived here?
A About 30 years.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe?
A I did.
Q How long have you known him?
A I couldn't say how many years I have known him. I have known him probably four or five years, something like that.
Q You know of his moving in here about eight years ago or so?
A Yes, I remember when he moved in, but I don't remember the number of the years it would be back.
Q Have you been over around his place any?
A I have.
Q Did you neighbor back and forth with him some?
A Well, very little. I don't know as I was at his place over four or five times, or something like that.
(269)

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Q One time shortly before this happened, he attempted to give you a horse?
A He didn't attempt it, he gave it to me.
Q You later brought it back to him?
A Yes, sir.
Q What are the circumstances in connection with that?
A He was installing a lighting system for a neighbor.
Q Who was the neighbor?
A Mr. Witt. I wasn't doing much, and I use to go up and look on, and sometimes I use to ride down home with him, and one evening he says (I don't keep any horses, I haven't kept any horses on my place for two or three years), and one evening he says to me, "Havr you any use for a horse," and I says, "I don't know, I expect I could use one once in a while."
Q About how long ago was that that you had that talk?
A Now, I don't just remember. It would be, oh, close onto two weeks ago.
Q Two weeks ago now?
A Yes. So he says, "Well," he says, "There is two horses over in the barn tearing the barn down," and he says, "Come on over and get one," and I didn't say whether I would or I wouldn't; but finally, about a couple of days after that he brought this horse over, harness and all ready to work, and I said "This is pretty nice to have somebody wait on you like that," and he says, " Oh, I don't mind that." And my sister was going to town, and I said, "Wait and my sister will drive you home," and he says, "No, I Will take it across lots, I don't mind walking back." So he starts back, he didn't stay there five minutes. So it rum along probably two or three days; of course we knew he use to go to town in Lansing to see his wife, his wife was stopping with her sister, and just came out of the hospital a short time before that.
Q You said he came back there two or three days later?
A And one evening he was over there, I don't remember whether he
(270)

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had been up to Mr. Weeds or not, but at any rate he stopped there, and the folks know he was lone over at his home, and they insisted on him staying for supper. So, we went out and was sitting out in the yard, talking quite a few minutes, and he put his hand in his pocket and he pulled out this paper and handed it to me, and I said "What is this," and he said "Read it," and I said "I can't read it, I haven't got my glasses," so he says "I will read it for you," and he read it for me and I was stunned.
Q Have you got that paper with you?
A Yes, sir, I have.
Q May I see it?
A Yes, sir.
MR. SEARL: I am going to put a little mark on it so we can identify it.
          (Paper marked Exhibit 1)
MR. SEARL: I marked this Exhibit 1. This reads as follows:
"May 4. 1927, 19--
Received from Allen McMullen
One hundred twenty dollars in
full payment for one bay mare,
ten years old, blind in left eye,
weight 1800 pounds. Named Kit.
$120.00.     A. P. Kehoe."
Q This Exhibit 1 is the paper he gave you at that time?
A That is the one, the only paper he ever gave me.
Q Did he say anything about that?
A He said "You stick to that."
Q What did you say to him?
A I didn't say anything, I was dumb-founded.
Q This is dated May 4th. Is that the day he was there?
A Yes, I think probably it was.
Q Did Mr. Kehoe have a typewriter, do you know, it seems to be typewritten?
A I couldn't say that. I know nothing about the inside of his house.
Q You didn't know about his having a typewriter?
(271)

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A No, I know nothing about his business at all.
Q Did you pay him anything for the horse?
A I didn't pay him a cent.
Q Was there any talk about your buying the horse?
A There was once. He asked me what I would give him, and I made some remark that I couldn't buy him, simply language like that.
Q In your conversation on May 4th when he gave you this, what all was said? He said stick to this?
A That was all that was said that evening. I mean in regard to the horse.
Q Did he tell you if anything came up that you was to tell you bought the horse?
A He didn't no.
Q He didn't make any explanation?
A No explanation at all.
Q Did you see him after that?
A I did.
Q When?
A Well, it was -- well, I should judge probably three days after that. This thing worried me. I made up my mind that I was probably going to got into trouble in some way or form, and it worried me so I made up my mind I wasn't going to keep the horse. I didn't do hardly anything with it while I did have it. So I got up one morning, and I said I am going to got this off my mind right away, so I walked over to his place that morning. I was over there at 8:00 o'clock. First I went to see if his machine was there, because I knew he was in the habit of going to Lansing to see his wife nearly every day, so I went and looked, and the machine was there, and thinks I to myself he is home all right now. So I went up and knocked to the back, and didn't get no answer. Then I went around to the front door and I knocked there, and he didn't answer, so I stood around for a while, and I walked across the road to his neighbor Mr. Hart.
Q That would be David M. Hart?
(272)

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A David M. Hart. And I asked them if they had seen anything of him, and she said no they hadn't, but "I saw a light there late in the night." So I kind of made my mind up he must be in the house, so I went back and sat around there. No, this Mr. Hart says "Go in the house and ring him up, you might rout him out," so I went in the house --
Q That would be in Hart's house on the telephone?
A Yes. So I went in the house and rung him up and there was nothing doing. So I talked there a while, and I went back to the house and I sat down on the steps, and I sat there for over an hour, and I began to think he might have hung himself in the house, and thinks I, I am here and I am going to stay until I see this thing through. I was going to go and get some of the neighbors and investigate, so I sat there for an hour or better, and I went up and knocked again pretty hard and he got up and came downstairs.
Q Was he dressed when he came downstairs?
A He just got up.
Q Did he have his nightclothes on?
A No, he had his pants on, and that is about all -- and slippers.
Q What time of day was that?
A Well that was about -- it might have been a little after nine o'clock.
Q Would that be slow time or Eastern Time?
A No, it would be Eastern Time.
Q Did he say anything to you when he got there?
A When he opened the door for me and I said, "What is the matter, are you going to kill yourself sleeping," he kind of grinned and said, "It wouldn't be a bad way to die, would it," and I said "Probably not." So I went in the house and sat down and talked a little while, and I made different excuses, reasons why I didn't want to keep the horse you see, and he was quite surprised. So he went down in the basement -- he had some cider, and he went down in the basement and he brought up a glass, and he says to me, "Now,"
(273)

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he says, "You sit tight, and I will go down and I will throw the horse some hay, and I will drive you home," and I said, "No, don't do that, I will take it cross lots, I don't mind walking over there." "No," he says, "I will drive you home." So, of course, I drank the cider, I wouldn't leave that you know. So I got to thinking it over, that he was away from home so much, and I didn't care about staying in the house alone, thinking may be something might become missing in the house, so I got up and followed him out, and there was a big door that lead into the basement and I met him coming up out of the basement. He probably thought I was going down and oil up a little more. So we went down to the barn, and he fed the horse and he started over towards his machine and went over there. I followed him. He says "Get in," and I says "No, go on and get your breakfast, you are going to town." and I says "Go on, I can walk home." "No," he says, "I aint going to get any breakfast until I get to town, I won't be going down for an hour or so, I have got to shave." So I got in, and he drove me home, and he didn't stop a minute, turned right around and came back home. Well, I didn't bring the horse back for a couple of days I guess after that. So, one morning I made up my mind I would bring her home, and I know he was going Lansing because he called up that morning and asked my sisters if they wanted to go to Lansing, and they said they did. So I got within a quarter of a mile of his house when I met him on the road, and he appeared to be quite surprised. We talked just a minute or two there, and he says "I will go back and help you put the horse in the barn." He says "I Will take you over home." So we turned right around and went back and put the horse in the barn, and when we was unharnessing it he says to me, "Al, you made a mistake by not keeping that horse over there." I didn't answer. I didn't say a word. So I rode back to the corner of the road.
Q Did he explain to you any more why you made a mistake?
A No, nothing more. That is the last I saw of him. I got out, my
(274)

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sister met him out to the corner of the road. When he met her there he went on, and I walked home, and that was the last I ever saw him.
Q Driving from your house to his house, you wouldn't go through Bath on this State reward road?
A No. Go west about a mile I should judge, something like that, then pretty near a mile north to my place.
Q About when was that when you took the horse back, about how long before this explosion?
A I should judge about a week.
Q And during any of the time you were around his house or buildings did you notice this wiring?
A Not anything. In fact, I wasn't around there to see anything.
Q It could have been there and you not notice?
A Oh, yes, it could have been there a hundred times.
Q Did you see anything in the house?
A Nothing in the house. Everything around the house was slick. He was a clean man around the house anyway.
Q Did he appear to watch you when you was around his buildings?
A No, because I never was around with him.
Q He wanted to go back with you when you wanted to take this horse back?
A He wanted to go back, but I think he didn't want me to be poking around the barn alone, and I think that is the reason he went down in the basement in the morning, for fear I might go down there while he would be in the barn, that is my idea.
Q You didn't go down in the basement?
A No, I didn't.
Q Each time you were in the barn, he was right there with you?
A He was there with me.
Q The only barn you was in when he wasn't with you was the garage?
A The garage and the barn.
Q Where were you when you were in the garage?
A Right there with him.
(275)

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Q The only time when he wasn't with you was when you looked in the garage?
A That morning.
Q Did you see anything unusual in the garage?
A No, sir.
Q No boxes?
A No.
Q You didn't see anything in the machine there?
A No, there wasn't nothing in the machine that I know of.
Q Did you ever know of his having a high-powered rifle around there?
A He did have a rifle.
Q Did you see it?
A Not then. I saw it when I was there one time before.
Q How long ago?
A I guess a month and a half ago.
Q Did he show it to you and explain it to you?
A He did.
Q Could you tell what caliber it was?
A I couldn't. I know nothing about firearms at all.
Q It was a new rifle?
A That I couldn't say because I don't know.
Q Did he any he had it for hunting deer?
A No.
Q Did he say why he had it?
A No.
Q Did he show you any shells that would fit it?
A No, but I have seen the shells.
Q Where did you see them?
A He brought some over and showed them to Mr. Weed's boys. When my sister was home, she was over taking care of her for about two or three weeks.
Q Could you identify one of those shells?
A I don't know wether I could or not.
(276)

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Q Did it look like that (indicating)?
A I think it was larger, if I remember right. It seems to me it was a little larger than that. I couldn't be positive, because I didn't pay much attention to it.
Q Did you ever see him have a revolver around there?
A I didn't.
Q Did he ever tell you about having a revolver around there?
A He didn't.
Q Did you ever see him do any shooting around there, shooting at a mark or anything of that kind?
A I have heard of him shooting at a target.
Q Do you know anything about him going to Jackson and getting this pyrotol?
A Not until I have heard it talked now.
Q Before that did he ever tell you he had dynamite or pyrotol for sale there?
A No, sir.
Q Did you know of his trouble with the School Board?
A No. You see we were never intimate friends. He was kind of a distant sort of a man. I never pressed my friendship on him, I knew enough to keep a civil distance.
Q Why should he give you this horse?
A I don't know. That is the reason why I didn't keep the horse, because I was so surprised. I could have kept the horse, you see yourself.
Q He wasn't under obligation to you?
A Not at all.
Q He didn't owe you anything?
A Not a cent.
Q For work or anything?
A Not a cent.
Q Did you ever give him anything?
A Nothing.
(277)

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Q Did your women folks go back and forth?
A My wife was quite intimate with his wife. I have met him in town and he bought a cigar for me once or twice.
Q Did you take part With him in his politics?
A I don't know as I did. There was one meeting over here, and I think I mentioned his name, is all the part I took.
Q That was at Town Meeting?
A Yes.
Q Was that this year?
A No, two years ago I think.
Q He was in politics a little, he ran for Justice of the Peace this last Spring election, you know about that?
A Yes. I don't know what office it was.
Q He took quite an active part in political affairs?
A Now, that part I don't know anything about.
Q You weren't active with him in anything of that kind?
A Not any more than I would be with any person in this room, as far as that is concerned.
Q Did he ever talk with you about the taxes up here to the school being high?
A I think he has.
Q Complained about them?
A I think he has.
Q Were you one of his supporters in getting him on the School Board?
A I don't know but what I did.
Q There was quite a few that combined to get him on the School Board?
A I thought he was quite a capable fellow to fill the position.
Q He was?
A Yes, sir.
Q He was well educated?
A Yes, sir.
Q And accurate in figures?
A I knew he was good at figures from seeing him up there installing
(278)

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this lighting system, it didn't take him long to figure out anything, I could see that.
Q You never heard of him being dishonest?
A No, sir, I didn't.
Q Before this explosion occurred did you ever see anything to indicate he was insane in any way?
A Well, I couldn't say that I did. I couldn't say that I did.
Q And yet you surmised he might have hung himself that morning?
A Yes, I thought possibly something did happen. It was in my mind why he should give me that horse, and him not under any obligation to me at all. That was what I was thinking about.
Q Were you at home when you heard the schoolhouse blow up?
A Yes.
Q Did you have any suspicion of Andrew Kehoe when you heard it?
A No, sir. When I heard it I was working in the barn yard. My man was drawing out manure. I said "There goes Monty Ellsworth's gas station," and I said "I bet that woman is killed." It is connected with the house.
Q That is what you thought that it was?
A Yes.
Q Could you see the fire over to Kehoe's?
A Yes.
Q Could you see Kehoe's buildings from your place?
A No, I don't' think you could. You could see the fire.
Q Which did you notice first, the explosion or the fire?
A I couldn't say. There is a block of timber, and I think that it kind of -- that you can't see the place.
Q The smoke would have to get in the air before you would see it?
A And there is kind of a hill between that, and I guess it was the smoke.
Q You think you saw the smoke before you heard the explosion?
A Oh, no, no, after the explosion.
Q Did you go down to the school then?
(279)

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A Yes. There Was a neighbor coming along, and I came on with them. I was coming past his place. We didn't know anything about the school until we met somebody that was going over here, and they said the schoolhouse was blowed up. So this man had a boy down here in school, so we just jumped on his truck and came right down here.
Q Who was that man?
A Mr. Weed.
Q What is his first name?
A Henry.
Q That is the neighbor that you have been taking about, living near you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see Kehoe when you got down here, or on your way down?
A No.
Q This last explosion occurred before you got down here to the school?
A Yes.
Q Did you hear this last explosion while you were on the road?
A We heard two before I left home.
Q You heard two before you left home?
A Yes. I don't know where they were, whether at the farm or down here.
Q Did you hear any explosion at the Kehoe farm while you were going by?
A No, there was no explosion while we were there.
Q Have you any idea how long it was between the two explosions you heard?
A No, I haven't. There wasn't very much time between them.
Q What would you estimate it as?
A I couldn't say. Probably three minutes, or something like that I should judge.
Q Did you hear any other explosion besides those two?
(280)

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A No, I didn't. Probably they might have occurred while we were on the road.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe's body afterward?
A No, I didn't notice. I guess there wasn't much to see. No, my curiosity didn't run that far.
Q. Do you know anything else about this that I haven't asked you about?
A Nothing that I know of. I think I have told you all I know about it, everything I know anything about.
MR SEARL: I guess that is all, unless you gentlemen have some questions.
A JUROR: Did this horse get away from you and go down the road?
A That I was taking home?
A JUROR: No, when he was bringing it over there?
A Well, yes, the horse got out. Let's see, how was that. I don't remember how -- he broke the halter or something and came down the road to Charley Hobart's, and Monty Ellsworth was over there that same morning getting some potatoes, and he drove me down and got the horse, and I took it back home.

-----oooOOOooo-----

JAY POPE,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your name?
A Jay Pope.
Q Where do you live?
A Mile and a quarter north and east of here.
Q Where were you when this explosion occurred last Wednesday morning?
(281)

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A Right here in this barber shop.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe that morning at all?
A No.
Q You didn't see him when he was in town in the forenoon?
A No.
Q Did you go up to the schoolhouse when the explosion occurred?
A Yes, sir.
Q What did you see when you got up there?
A I saw an awful sight.
Q You saw the general condition that has been described here?
A Yes, sir.
Q The roof was down when you got there?
A Yes.
Q And the children around there?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck at that time?
A Not at that time. Not when I first went up there, I didn't see him.
Q What did you do? Were you engaged with man in getting this telephone pole?
A No, not particularly engaged.
Q Tell what you did?
A When I got up there I saw we was practically helpless, there was only four. Of course they begun to come right along, mostly women; but I went to the telephone office and told them to call for help, and it wasn't but a minute or two when Monty Ellsworth drove up. I asked him if he knew where anybody had a big rope, and he said yes, and I asked him if he would get it, and he drove right off, and it wasn't only a few minutes when he came back with the rope. At that time we dug down umder the ruins, and I thought if we got a big pry-pole we could release them, and I asked Monty if he knew where there was a telephone pole and he said yes, and it wasn't only a little while until he came back with that.
(282)

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Q Shortly after that the second explosion occurred?
A Quite a little bit.
Q You had done some work with this telephone pole?
A Yes. In the meantime I guees we had got one child out and taken that across the road, and came back before he came with the telephone pole.
Q How long after that was it you saw Mr. Huyck?
A Probably 20 minutes. He was on the other side of the schoolhouse helping take children out, and I didn't see him until I had carried I think the third child out of the schoolhouse, and when I came back he was standing by the stoop.
Q Did you have any conversation with him?
A Only he said "Did you ever see anything like this," and I said no, and that was the last I saw of him.
Q How far had you gotten back towards the schoolhouse when this second explosion occurred?
A I had gotten clear up on the brick, and had begun to throw brick.
Q After this explosion did you go out in front?
A Immediately, I did, may be a minute or two; and they had got one child loose, and the women seemed to carry them a good deal, and I happened to take a child out of a woman's hands and started for the road, and I saw the fire under the machines. Of course, I heard the explosion, and I looked and I saw something go up in the trees, I don't know whether it was a man's body or not.
Q And then you saw those cars catch fire?
A Yes. There seemed to be gasoline along on the ground under the trees.
Q Did you go over there then?
A No, I didn't.
Q Did you see Mr. Smith around there, the Postmaster?
A No, I didn't see him. Yes, I did too. I saw him sitting on the bank when I came back across, but I didn't know he was hurt until five or ten minutes after that.
(283)

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May be a half hour after I happened to go over there, and I looked at it.
Q You could identify that as his body?
A I couldn't.
Q It was identified in your presence as his body?
A Yes.
Q There was no question about it?
A No question about it.
Q So you didn't have any talk with anybody around there that explained how that explosion happened?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe's body?
A They called it his body.
Q You couldn't identify it?
A No.
Q How long do you think it was between the first and last explosion?
A The one that killed Mr. Huyck?
Q Yes.
A I should judge it was around 20 to 25 minutes. I know we got out quite a number of little children, because it took quite a time to get that stuff out, and there was quite a number of little children got out.
Q Did you ever see any cars up around the schoolhouse at night?
A No, I never did.
Q Have you any reason to believe there was anybody else in this but Kehoe?
A No, I don't. I don't think there was a man in Bath that he would take into his confidence.
Q Did you know Kehoe well?
A No, I didn't.
Q Do you think he was a man to do things by himself?
A I would think he was.
Q He was quite a man to mix in politics?
(284)

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A No, he wasn't. As far as his politics were concerned, they had put him in to finish out the -- or finish out Mrs. Prices clerkship, and I guess they tried to nominate him for something else.
MR. SEARL: I guess that is all, unless you gentlemen have some questions. I guess that is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

EVERETT LEONARD,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Where were you Mr. Leonard when this explosion occurred?
A I was home.
Q Where do you live?
A Two miles north of Bath.
Q And you lived near Al. McMullen?
A Two miles and a half from him.
Q West of him?
A North and east.
Q How old a man are you?
A Thirty-one.
Q Are you married?
A Yes.
Q Now, after the explosion did you come down town?
A Yes.
Q Did you go around the Kehoe's at all?
A No, I started around here, I saw the smoke. I heard the explosion and I saw the smoke and I started around that way, and I just got started and my brother was here in Bath when that explosion first happened, and I had two children here and he couldn't find only one of them, and he came right out and told me, and I turned around and came right back here.
(285)

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Q Where were you when the second explosion or the last went off?
A I only heard one. I was in the school building when the second one come.
Q Did you drive up here in an automobile?
A Yes.
Q What road did you take?
A A mile east to the town line, and then straight south to the end of the road, and then past Sleight's.
Q A mile cast would take you to the McGonical corners?
A Yes.
Q How long between these two explosions?
A It don't seem as if it could have been more than twenty minutes.
Q Did you see Kehoe when you were coming in?
A I don't know him.
Q You don't know him to recognize him at all?
A No.
Q The way he has been described to you, do you think you saw the man around that morning at all?
A No, I don't think so.
Q Did anybody pass you in a Ford pick-up?
A No.
Q When you were coming along this road into town did you pass Sleight?
A I don't know. I passed everything on the road.
Q You were so excited you didn't pay attention. When you got up here did you hear Glenn Samith make any statement?
A I didn't see Glenn Smith, I went straight to the schoolhouse.
Q Where did you go after the second explosion?
A I was looking for my little girl, and Bert Detloff and I was in that school when the second explosion took place. We thought it was another explosion in the building, we didnlt know it was a car that blew up, and I didn't know until quite a little while afterwards that somebody was hurt.
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Q Do you know anything more about this in any way?
A No, I don't believe it.
Q Have you heard anything that would lead you to believe that there was anybody else in this but Kehoe?
A Just talk. Not anything that anybody knew, just suspicion.
Q Nothing with any foundation that you could discover?
A No, No.
Q And that talk was that it was such a big job that it didn't seem that any one man could do it?
A Yes. It didn't seem possible that any one man could do that much.
MR. SEARL: That is all.

-----oooOOOooo-----

O. B. ROUNDS,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Where do you live Mr. Rounds?
A About a quarter miles south and east of here.
Q How old a man are you?
A Seventeen.
Q You are in school here?
A Yes.
Q Were you in school that morning of the explosion?
A I was out in front of the school, I was on my way to school.
Q Where were you when this explosion went off?
A Up by that stone wall by Hall's.
Q That was when the first explosion occurred?
A That was when the first one occurred.
Q When you were up there did you notice any fires out at Kehoe's?
A No.
Q Did you see this girl, Cassie McFarren, that morning at all?
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A I saw her, but I think it was after the explosion.
Q You didn't see Cassie McFarren or Wendell McFarren, her father?
A I saw both of them, but I think after the explosion.
Q Did you see some boys out in front playing ball when you came along?
A Yes.
Q There was four of them?
A Yes.
Q And just as you got to this stone wall the building blew up?
A Yes.
Q What did you see?
A Of course I heard the noise and saw the smoke rolling out, and all I could think of was a fire. It wasn't smoke, it was just the blast and dust.
4 Did you see it collapse?
A Yes.
Q The west side of the north wing collapsed?
A Yes. The west end of the roof came down first, and it tore away from the other part.
Q As the roof came down did you see any other part of the building fall?
A No.
Q That was about all there was to it?
A That was all I saw.
Q Did you see the roof go up in the air before it fell?
A No. I don't know as I was looking exactly at the building, but I saw it fall.
Q Would you say what caused the roof to fall was this west wall going down from under the roof?
A Yes, I would.
Q Did you see children in there?
A I did.
Q Then what did you do?
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A I run to the schoolhouse as fast as I could get there, and I run in the schoolhouse after the building had fallen down. There was space enough to get through there, and we went on the inside and began to pull up 2 x 4's.
Q Was you a little late for school that morning, or didn't you have to be there?
A I didn't have to be there until ten o'clock.
Q What time do you think it was when you saw this explosion?
A Well, about 8:45.
Q Did you work around the school building in helping with the children?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear this other explosion?
A I did.
Q About how much later was that?
A From 20 minutes to half an hour.
Q Where were you when that went off?
A I had taken my little brother across the road to his grandmother's, it was on the way back.
Q Was your brother killed?
A No, he was hit.
Q What is his name?
A Jack.
Q And you found him there in the debris?
A Yes.
Q Then, were you up around the school building when this last explosion went off?
A I was just crossing the yard, and got about half way back.
Q The school yard?
A Yes.
Q Did this explosion knock you down?
A No, I don't think it did. It wasn't as hard as the first one. The first stunned me.
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Q Did the first one knock you down?
A Not as I remember, but it knocked me back.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck there that morning?
A After the first explosion.
Q Where?
A On the south end, going around the corner.
Q Did you have some talk with him?
A No. I was down to the other end. I happened to glance up, and I saw him going between the barn and the schoolhouse.
Q Did you go out in front after this last explosion?
A No.
Q Did you have any talk with Glenn Smith?
A Glenn had helped me before that, but I didn't know those men were dead until quite a lot later.
Q Did you see Andrew Kehoe that morning?
A No.
Q You didn't see him drive up and park?
A No.
Q Were you familiar with him, do you know him?
A I knew him for five years, since I went to school here. I was familiar with him the last three years or so.
Q Were you familiar with his car?
A Yes.
Q Did you see it afterwards?
A Yes, sir.
Q Any question in your mind but what that was his car?
A No.
Q You identified it by the speedometer on the left front wheel?
A Yes.
Q That is about all you could identify it by?
A Yes.
Q Did you see his body?
A I did.
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Q No question in your mind about it being his body?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck's body?
A No.
Q What else do you know about this?
A Nothing else.
Q Except the general talk?
A Yes, just the general talk.
Q Have you been down in the basement of the school building?
A Yes, I have.
Q Have you ever noticed anything down there to indicate any wiring?
A I noticed the north door one night was unlocked.
Q Would that be the north door in the rear?
A Yes.
Q How long ago was that?
A That was two or three weeks ago. We had a club meeting there, and before Mr. Huyck had come we walked around there to see if we could get in. Come to find out, that was open, and we could open the main doors from the inside.
Q Did you speak to Mr. Huyck about that?
A We did, and he thought it was funny at the time.
Q Did he say anything about the door being sprung so it wouldn't close?
A I don't remember.
Q Did he say anything about it should be fixed?
A I don't remember whether he went back to see whether he could lock it or not. I know he didn't go home with us.
Q That was the only thing you ever noticed about the school building?
A Yes.
Q Did you know about the door being jammed?
A In the winter it was jammed with ice.
(291)

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Q It was difficult to lock?
A Yes. And then I have seen, I don't know when it was, but I have seen lights up in Mr. Huyck's office when I was coming from town sometime ago.
Q How long ago?
A Two weeks ago. And the curtains pulled down. I thought then that probably Mr. Huyck must be up there working.
Q Did you ever notice his machine out there in front?
A No.
Q That is, nights?
A No.
Q Did you see any machine around there when you saw this light in his office?
A I don't remember whether I did or not.
Q Was it moonlight then?
A No, it was very dark.
Q What time do you think it was?
A Between 10:30 and 11:00 o'clock.
Q Outside of that night did you see any lights or anybody around there any, except on these nights when they had those meetings or something going on there?
A No.
MR. SEARL: I guess that is all, unless you gentlemen have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----






(292)

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GEORGE HALL,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name, Mr. Hall?
A George.
Q Where do you live?
A 2-1/2 miles west.
Q And how old a man are you?
A Forty-one.
Q Your house would be a little west and a little south of Kehoe's place?
A Mile west and a mile north, and a half mile west.
Q This morning of May 18th did you go over to Mr. Kehoe's house?
A Yes, sir.
Q How was your attention first attracted to it?
A I saw the smoke.
Q Did you hear an explosion?
A No. I was about half mile west of my place, looking for a couple of calves, and I turned around and saw the smoke.
Q And did you go over to his house?
A Just then I saw one of my neighbors, and I said "Did you see this smoke," and he said yes, "I heard an awful explosion," and he got in my car and we stopped and got a neighbor, and we all come over.
Q Who was the neighbors?
A Will Horning and Mrs. Zeeb.
Q Did you see Mr. Kehoe around there when you got there?
A No.
Q Did you see anybody else in the yard when you first got there?
A I can't remember, we was so excited. We left my car parked, and run to that window where they were hauling the furniture out.
Q You all three helped with the furniture?
A No.
(293)

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Q Did you go in the house?
A No. There was a man that came to the window with dynamite, and he threw it out in the garden.
Q Did you take this dynamite?
A No.
Q How much did he have?
A Three or four sticks. I think he worked for the road gang. I don't mean that -- the Consumer's Power Company.
Q You never learned his name?
A No.
Q You do know there was dynamite taken out of the house?
A I saw it. I saw it thrown in the garden.
Q Do you know what became of that later?
A No.
Q Do you know whether it was turned over to the State Police?
A No.
Q Do you know whether there was three or four sticks?
A I think three or four, he had quite a handful. He said, "You better got out of here," and we all started to run towards the road and down towards that tool shed.
Q Did he tell you where he found this in the house?
A No.
Q Do you know whether there was any scattered in the ruins of the house?
A No.
Q Did you go over to Hart's after that?
A Yes, we went over to Hart's, and just as we got over there Mrs. Hart said the schoolhouse is blowed up, and I got one of my neighbors and we started towards the schoolhouse.
Q You had some children here in school?
A Three.
Q During the time you were at Hart's house or around Kehoe's, how many explosions do you think you heard in Kehoe's place?
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A I don't know, quite a few of them. I imagine three or four or five or six.
Q When you got to the schoolhouse had this last explosion gone off?
A No.
Q Where were you when that took place?
A Out near that little wing, by that little hall where they took the bodies out, right in there some place, looking for my boy. I don't know whether I had found him or not. It seems as if I had hold of him then.
Q Did you go out in front after the last axplosion?
A No.
Q Where did you go after the last explosion?
A I was looking for my girl, and I started down the street and I met Earl Riker, and we came home and I met my wife, and we came back.
Q Had you found your girl before you went home?
A No. I had asked quite a few, but I hadn't found her. I knew she was dead, I had been told. I saw the boy before I got home.
Q The boy and girl were both killed?
A Yes.
Q Did you see Glenn Smith that morning?
A No.
Q Talk with him at all?
A No.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A No.
Q Do you know anything else about this in any way?
A No.
MR. SEARL: That is all I guess, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----


(295)

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BARTON J. FOX,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
          (Papers marked Exhibits 2, 3 and 4)
Q Your full name is Barton J. Fox?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you are the Sheriff of Clinton County?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you know about what time it was on Wednesday, May 18th, when you got here to Bath?
A Well, I think I left St. Johns about 10:30, and I wasn't very long coming.
Q I should imagine about 11:00 o'clock, wasn't it?
A I think so.
Q After you got here to Bath was your attention called to the body of Andrew Kehoe?
A It was.
Q Did you see that body?
A Yes.
Q Did you meet a Mrs. Leone Smith that morning?
A Yes.
Q I show these Exhibits 2, 3 and 4, and ask you if you can identify them?
A They were handed to me by Mrs. Smith.
Q That is Mrs. Leone Smith, Frank Smith's wife?
A Yes.
Q Can you tell what they are?
A That is an Operator's License (indicating).
Q Exhibit 2?
A Yes.
MR. SEARL: And reads as follows, I won't read all of this, it is on the usual form:
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         "Operator's License No. 345742. Date February 17th, 1926. A. P. Kehoe, residing at Bath, Michigen is hereby licensed to operate a motor vehicle in accordance with the provisions of Act. No. 368, Public Acts of 1919, as amended. Description of Person Licensed: Age 45 years; Color of Hair, grey; Height, 5 ft. 9 inches; Color of Eyes, Blue; Sex, male; Color, white; Weight, 150 pound." And the signature "Charles J. Deland."
Q February 17th, 1926, would make Mr. Kehoe 46 years old according to this, wouldn't it?
A Yes.
Q And this Exhibit 3, would you say is a bank book?
A That is what I took it to be, and it was with that, they were both together.
Q The three of these exhibits, 2, 3 and 4, were all together when handed to you?
A Yes, sir.
Q This bank book appears to be on the Lilley State Bank of Tecumseh, Michigan. It looks like Phillip Kehoe?
A That is what I take it to be. It isn't very plain.
Q There is nothing on this book to show any dates that you found?
A No.
Q I notice some writing in here which reads. "Entered St. Lawrence January 26th, 1927, checked out March 2nd, 1927." You learned that Mr. Kehoe's wife had been in St. Lawrence Hospital?
A Yes.
Q And there is some other memorandums in this book?
A Yes. His signature is on this driver's license.
Q This signature of Licensee, A. P, Kehoe, looking at this signature on Exhibit 1, you would say they were the same?
A The same handwriting I would think.
Q Exhibit 4 seems to be a small envelope with nothing on it?
A The Operator's License was inside of that.
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Q I see.
A And you will notice here that there is a break in that, and also in the license, as though that was hit with something.
Q All of them were together and had a break through all of them that looks like a cut?
A Yes.
Q Now here is a 30-caliber Peters rifle shell?
A That was picked up right near the scene of the accident.
Q Right near where Kehoe's car blew up?
A Yes.
Q Here in Bath?
A Yes.
Q And was turned over to you?
A Yes.
Q And this we will call Exhibit 5; and this Exhibit 6, the bullet, where was that?
A That was right on the ground right near the wreckage.
Q Near Kehoe's car?
A Yes.
Q That is apparently the bullet out of one of these 30-caliber shells?
A I think so.
Q And there is a shell, another one which we will call Exhibit 7, where did you get that?
A That was right near Kehoe's car.
Q Now, I will call your attention to the back of the shell, I guess you would call it, it has never been fired with a gum has it?
A No.
Q There is Exhibit 8, which apparently is a 38 revolver shell?
A Aha. That was right there.
Q Did you notice the back of that as to whether that has ever been shot in a gun of any kind?
A I don't think it had. I didn't examine it very closely. It never
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has bewn, no.
Q Those are all center fire, aren't they?
A Yes.
Q These last four exhibits were all picked up right near the car?
A Yes, right there near the car.
Q Now, I wil show you these shears, Exhibit 9, where did you get those?
A Right close by there.
Q Right by his car?
A Yes. You see they are badly burned.
Q And the shears are broken, part of the shears are gone, badly broken and bent on the points?
A Yes. Those are in the same condition as when I got them.
Q All of these are in the same condition as when you got them?
A Yes.
Q Heree is another, Exhibit 10, appears to be a registration card?
A Yes, ordinary registration card.
Q License No. -- 27, indicating the year 1927?
A Yes.
Q No. 59631; Name of Owner, A. P. Kehoe; Post Office Address, Bath, State, Michigan; R. F. D. 4; Trade name of car Ford; Style of body Convertible Roadster; Engine No. 13145114; Factory Serial Number none; Title No. 1365055; Signature of Owner A. P. Kehoe. And that you would say is the same signature as these others?
A Just the same.
MR. SEARL: I think we will ask to introduce all exhibits on the record.
THE CORONER: Yes.
Q Mr. Fox, did you go to Mr. Kehoe's farm on Thursday, the next day?
A Yes, I was down there Thursday.
Q Did you see Mrs. Kehoe's body?
(299)

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A Yes.
Q And you heard the State Fire Marshall explain the position it was in?
A Yes.
Q And you saw it in about that same position?
A Practically, yes.
Q Did you notice the corset stays on her?
A Yes.
Q And part of a stocking, indicating she was dressed at the time she was killed?
A Yes.
Q From the position you saw the body in, is there any question in your mind to believe it wasn't burned right in that position?
A No. For several reasons. There was several buttons in the ashes, and buckles of her garters, etc., which indicated she was burned there and nowhere else.
Q Did you notice her left knee across the axle of the cart?
A Yes. The left wheel lay across the axle of the cart, the stocking was burned fast to the spoke.
Q Did you notice how her body fell to pieces when it was picked up?
A Yes.
Q You don't think it could possibly have been burned and then moved there?
A It couldn't possibly have been moved, because as soon as we touched it the skull fell to pieces.
Q You noticed the condition of the silver in this box that was picked up there?
A Yes.
Q You made some investigation as to the cause of this?
A A pretty thorough investigation, yes.
Q From your investigation, do you think Mrs. Kehoe was killed, or, at least burned in the place she was found, without question?
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A I think she was.
Q Have you any reason to believe anybody else was in this except Mr. Kehoe?
A I have not.
Q No question in your mind about it?
A I have been unable to find anything that would point to any person, and it wouldn't seen possible to me that any man capable of planning a crime of this kind would take anybody into his confidence if he expected to carry it out.
Q Did you inspect this dynamite?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you have seen the places where the dynamite was removed from the school?
A I did.
Q And from the places where it was found, do you think it could have been discovered in there by anybody?
A I don't think anybody could have noticed it unless they happened on it.
Q Being in the schoolhouse, and the dynamite being in the places it was, you don't think anybody would discover it?
A I don't think so, unles thee accidently seen it, something to attract their attention to it.
A JUROR: Does these numbers correspond with the numbers on the wreckage of the car?
A Yes.
A JUROR: The license plate?
A I think so.
A JUROR: The license plate wasn't on the front end?
A I haven't seen the license plate. The signature on the margin of the operator's License corresponds with the signature on the Registration Card.
A JUROR: The number on the motor, you haven't seen that?
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A No.
Q Whether it corresponds with the number on that card?
A No. It might be well to look that up.
MR SEARL: We will take a little recess here.
A I would say that in further identification of his body, when I first came to Bath that morning there was several people that called my attention that Mr. Kehoe's buildings had burned. We noticed them when we came by, but we didn't stop there, and we started to search for Mr. Kehoe, not knowing that he was killed at that time, and I went down into the road, and somebody called my attention to Mrs. Smith, she wanted to see me. She had this license that she found by the body; and there was several people around there that had seen Mr. Kehoe there that morning, and they said that is him because that is the same shirt that he had on, and we were satisfied beyond any doubt whatever that that was his body. These papers were all together, something like that (indicating), and they, were all broken the same.
A JUROR: They have got a slight cut in them?
A Yes, as though something of force went against them and broke them.
A JUROR: There was some talk that he shot into that. You didn't find any revolver?
A That was the talk, and that bullet was the only thing we found directly on the ground where the car stood.
A JUROR: No firearm?
A No, that was the only thing.
THE CORONER: Wasn't there a butt of a gun that the police have over to Lansing?
A I haven't seen such a thing.
MR. SEARL: I might explain this to you: We are skipping a good deal of it until the State Police come, because the State Police Secret Service were in charge of that most of that day, and the Sheriff and
(302)

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myself were working checking up, and I think Lieutenant Morse can explain that; and we will have blue-prints and diagrams to explain that to you.
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----

O. H. BUSH,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your full name?
A Oscar Henry Bush.
Q And where do you live?
A Okemos.
Q How old a man are you?
A Forty-five.
Q On Wednesday, May 18th, were you working in Bath here?
A I was working around Bath, yes sir.
Q What is your occupation?
A Construction Lineman Foreman of the Consumers Power Company.
Q The Consumers Power Company have been running a line in here preparatory to lighting the Village?
A Yes, sir.
Q I understand on this morning of May 18th, you had been to Lansing?
A Yes, sir.
Q And you were on your way home in the morning?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear an explosion on your way home?
A I think I did.
Q Where were you when you think you heard that?
A Just over that big hill the other side of Gunnisonville.
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Q Between Gunnisonville and the pavement?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you drive on towards Bath?
A Yes.
Q Was anybody with you?
A Yes, sir.
Q Who?
A Wayne Curtis.
Q He is one of the construction men?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you come down by the Andrew Kehoe place?
A Yes.
Q Stop there?
A Yes.
Q What did you do?
A I went around to see how bad it was burned.
Q All the buildings were in flames then?
A All but one.
Q Did you sse any smoke at that time over here?
A No, sir.
Q How long after that?
A Not over five minutes. I was only driving 20 to 25 miles an hour, and when I first saw the smoke I thought it was a freight train going through, and I didn't make any hurry about that until I saw it was buildings burning; and it is our custom when we see a building burning to go there as soon as we can get there and give all the help we can.
Q Is it your custom to cut light wires and telephone wires?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you make any investigation of this house for wires?
A No.
Q Being a farm house and building you didn't?
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A No.
Q Did you go in the house?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did this other man go in?
A I don't think so.
Q Did you carry out any of the furniture?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were you in the house more than once?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see any dynamite there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where?
A I was just outside the east window.
Q Did one of your men give you some dynamite?
A Wesley Campbell.
Q He was in the house?
A Yes, sir.
Q How much?
A Between ten and eighteen sticks.
Q Had it in his hands?
A Yes, sir.
Q Passed it out the window?
A At least two bundles, yes.
Q Were there any fuses there?
A No, sir.
Q You don't think there was any?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see any marked dynamite?
A When I went back after it, I saw it was newer than what they took out of the schoolhouse.
Q It was new dynamite?
A Yes.
Q Did you see a mark "40%" on there?
A Yes, Sir.
(305)

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Q Did you see the name "Hercules" or "Giant" or "Pyrotol"?
A I didn't pay any attention.
Q You saw this up at the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q Did it look like that?
A Same size, but it looked older.
Q This at the house was new?
A Perfectly new.
Q What did you do with this at the house?
A Passed it to a man, and he threw it over the fence.
Q Did you leave and go away from there then?
A In possibly one or two minutes we went across the road.
Q Did any explosion occur before you went across the road?
A No, sir.
Q Did you hear some afterwards, after you went across the road?
A Yes, sir, but it was very dull.
Q You heard some explosions in the other buildings besides the house?
A Yes, sir. One at the barn. After we left the house there was one more at the barn.
Q Did you come up to the schoolhouse?
A Yes.
Q You heard the explosion?
A The reason I went across the road was because there was embers blowing over to that big barn, and I had ladders to go on the big barn.
Q You didn't hear about the schoolhouse until you got here?
A There was one explosion.
Q Where were you when you heard that?
A At the farmhouse.
Q I didn't get that answer?
A I was at the farmhouse when I heard the explosion that blew up Kehoe's car.
(306)

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Q Did you see Kehoe around?
A I wouldn't know him if I saw him. I saw the man they said was Kehoe.
Q And that is all you know?
A Yes, sir.
A JUROR: Was that dynamite burned up that you had hold of?
A I went back between half past eleven and twelve o'clock and found four sticks of it. I gave it to the State Police here.
Q Was this Wayne Curtis with you all the time you were out there?
A Until I left the farm to come in to town.
Q Do you know any of the men that was down town here and saw Mr. Kehoe when he was blown up?
A John Snivley and Dart Lang was with the truck.
Q Was Wayne Curtis with the truck?
A Yes, sir.
Q You think all three of these men were down here when Andrew Kehoe was blown up?
A Wayne Curtis was possibly from here to the door from Kehoe's car when it blew up.
Q Did Wayne Curtis see him?
A He saw his hand stick out like this (indicating).
Q Where is he now?
A He will be, possibly, to the barn.
Q Can you get hold of those three men for us and have them here at three o'clock?
A Yee, sir.
MR. SEARL: Have you men any other questions?
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----



(307)

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AFTERNOON SESSION,
1:05 P. M.    


JESS CURTIS,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name, Mr. Curtis?
A Jess.
Q Where do you live, Mr. Curtis?
A Mason.
Q And how old a man are you?
A Forty-four.
Q Are you employed by the Consumers Power Company.
A Yes, sir.
Q And last week, May 18th, were you around Bath working for the Consumers Power Company?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear this first explosion at the school?
A No sir, I didn't hear that.
Q Was your attention attracted some?
A We had been to Lansing after a load of material on the truck, and we were on the road back.
Q Your Foreman spoke about coming back from Lansing. Were you just behind him in the truck?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you stop out at Mr. Kehoe's place?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go in the house out there?
A No, sir. I didn't go in the house. It was all in flames when we got there. I got possibly 20 feet from the truck when there was an explosion in the house, and they told me, somebody, there was one of these light systems in there. I forget what they called it.
(308)

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Q Acetylene.
A And about that time a lady came down the road and said the schoolhouse had blown up.
Q Who was with you?
A Johnnie Snivley and Dart Lang.
Q Where did you park your car here in town?
A We parked it on the road that runs east and west, I think, to the end of the street here.
Q Way down to the corner?
A Yes.
Q Did you walk or run up to the schoolhouse?
A Walked and run together.
Q Were you ahead of the other men?
A Yes. I didn't go to the schoolhouse at that time.
Q You did see another explosion there that morning?
A Yes.
Q Tell what happened from the time you started out ahead of the other boys there?
A I came up on the west side of the street on the walk until I got within where I could see the north part of the schoolhouse had gone down, then I crossed the street, what you would call diagonally across the street; and when I got almost middle ways of the street there was a car coming from the south, and he was traveling so fast I had to make a little extra exertion to get by.
Q You did go on across the street?
A Yes, sir.
Q How fast was that car going, do you know?
A I would guess it was traveling at least 30 miles an hour.
Q Did you see anybody in the car?
A Yes, I saw a man.
Q Can you describe the man in any way?
A No, I couldn't do that.
Q You just saw one man?
(309)

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A I just noticed the driver, and I wondered why he was driving so fast. I knew he couldn't stop and park there at the speed he was going.
Q What kind of a car?
A It was a Ford.
Q Did you notice the body of the car?
A No.
Q Where you crossed the street, was that in front of the schoolhouse?
A No, I came out -- I don't know if I could tell you exact -- it was right by -- there was a car parked by a tree, near the southwest corner of the schoolhouse when I heard this explosion.
Q Did you see this car after you got across the street?
A No. After I got across the street I came on south on the opposite side of the car that was parked there, and I saw the car when it exploded.
Q Then what happened?
A Really, I don't hardly remember. I remember being on the ground and getting up, and picking up my hat. I noticed two men on the sidewalk as I came in on the walk.
Q Did this explosion knock you down?
A Yes, sir, it knocked me down, and I didn't hardly know what took place, and almost immediately the window lights flew out of this house, and I was kind of confused whether it was a car or what it was.
Q Did you get hit in any way?
A Yes, sir. I don't know what you would call it, hit my overalls, cut clear through here with a piece of something.
Q On the right hip?
A Yes, sir, on the right hip.
Q Something cut that clear through to your underclothes?
A Yes, sir.
Q Didn't bruise your body?
A No, sir.
Q Were you just about opposite the tree when the explosion happened?
(310)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Did You know Andrew Kehoe?
A No, sir, I didn't know him at all.
Q Did you know the Superintendent, Mr.Huyck?
A No, sir.
Q Or the Postmaster, Mr. Smith.
A I knew him.
Q Did you see him around there?
A Yes, sir. I was on the walk when the smoke begun to lift, and he was in a stooped position when the smoke begun to raise, and he kept going gradually down, and I heard him call for help, and he finally got clear down on the ground when they got there.
Q Did you hear him make a statement?
A I heard him holler, but what he said I don't remember.
Q You didn't hear him say how it happened, or what had occurred, or anything of that kind?
A No.
Q And that was the first you saw of this car in any way, as you was running across the street?
A Yes, sir, as I was coming across the street. Possibly, I wouldn't have noticed that if I hadn't had to make such exertions to get across the street ahead of him.
Q Do you know anything else about how it happened?
A No, No, I don't.
Q That was somewheres around nine o'clock, or a little after?
A Well, we go by at they call Fast Time, and I imagine it was between 9:45 and 10:00 o'clock.
Q Fast Time?
A Fast Time, yes sir.
MR. SEARL: Ithink that is all, unless you men have some questions.
A JUROR: You didn't notice this car stop there?
A No, I didn't notice it stop, or see the machine after the explosion. That is what made me think it was the car that exploded.
(311)

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Q You don't know where the car went if it didn't explode?
A No , sir. hat is a mystery in my mind if it didn't explode.
Q Don't you think it was the car that passed you there that exploded?
A That is the impression I have in my mind. That is what I believed at the time.
THE CORONER: You think it didn't stop, or hadn't stopped?
A No, hadn't stopped. It couldn't have stopped. If that car didn't explode, it went on, because he couldn't have parked. He couldn't have stopped at the rate he was traveling.
MR. SEARL: That is all I guess.

-----oooOOOooo-----

DART LANG,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What. is your name?
A Dart Lang.
Q How old a man are you Mr. Lang?
A 28 years old.
Q Where do you live?
A I live in Mason.
Q You are employed by the Consumers Power Company?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were you with Mr. Curtis on this morning of May 18th?
A I was with Mr. Curtis.
Q On this truck coming from Lansing?
A Yes, sir.
Q When did you first notice this fire?
A Well, we noticed the smoke of the fire way down this side of the schoolhouse. I don't know what it is called -- Gunnisonville Schoolhouse.
(312)

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Q Where you struck the good road?
A Yes, sir.
Q You stopped down at the Kehoe house?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you go in the house?
A No.
Q Did you hear anything explode in there?
A The Foreman, Bush, came out to the truck and motioned us to park down the road farther on. We drove down the road and started back, and as I got back toward the house I heard an explosion in the house. Well, I stopped, and the first I heard was someone say it was an acetylene plant they had in there, then I heard it was dynamite. I don't know which it was. And then this Mrs. Hart, I think her name was, came out and said the schoolhouse had exploded. Then we went to town.
Q Tell what occurred from then on?
A We came on on the truck, and drove in to town and pulled up to this corner at the end of this street, pulled by the corner and parked on the south side of the road, and we started to the schoolhouse on a run, and as we came down this street John Curtis hollered at me and he said "Just a minute," and I stopped and asked him what was the matter, and he said "I just came from there, and if you haven't a strong heart you better not go up," and I said "Somebody better go up."
Q Which side of the street was you on?
A And I started to run up the road, and I heard a car coming behind me, and I turned around and I saw it coming up the road, and I hollered to John Snivley "Hot Rail."
Q What did you mean?
A A car coming about as fast as the truck, instead of telling him a car was coming we call it a hot rail.
Q You wanted to warn him to get out of the way?
A Yes. And when this car went by it was a Ford with a black livery box on behind, and I remember very distictly because I run to
(313)

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the ditch, and I said I wonder what is the matter with the man, is he crazy, and I aaw this car come up to the schoolhouse and make a dip to the right, and the explosion occurred.
Q Did you see anybody in this car?
A I didn't.
Q There was somebody driving?
A There was evidently.
Q Could you describe that man at all?
A No, sir.
Q This black body you spoke of on the truck is what we ordinarily call a Ford pickup?
A Yes, sir. It is something like what a storekeeper has to deliver groceries.
Q Did you see this car explode?
A I saw this car turn in from the right, swing in from the right and there was an explosion, but when the smoke cleared away the car was gone, it wasn't where it turned, and this other car lay there with the wheels blown up, which I understand was the Superintendent's car, and the one that they told me was Kehoe's was there. I didn't know at the time what it was, I took it for granted. What it reminded me of, I was across, and when I saw this explosion the first thing that appeared in my mind was the bomb of an airplane, that is what it gave me in my mind.
Q You say the car swerved to the right just a little before it exploded?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you think the car was stopped at all before it exploded?
A No, sir.
Q You think it exploded while it was running?
A Yes, sir.
Q Do you think it moved farther north during the explosion?
A Yes.
Q You saw the car after the explosion?
(314)

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A Yes.
Q And it was off the road there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And near some of these cars parked there, just around west of them, kind of in with them there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And would that be north of the spot where the car exploded?
A Just a little.
Q About how far do you think?
A After I got down there I didn't stop at that car on account of I saw Mr. Curtis go down after the explosion, and I went to look to see what became of him, and the next I saw of him was out by that filling station.
Q Out where?
A On the corner, the road going to Park Lake. I don't know what road that is called, and he was going South.
Q How long was that after this explosion?
A That was about 30 minutes, I should judge.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe?
A No, sir.
Q Never had seen him?
A No, sir.
Q You can't describe the man you saw in that car?
A No, sir.
Q You didn't see where the car came from when it came onto this road?
A No, sir. I didn't notice the car until I heard it coming from behind me.
Q You never noticed any car coming from the west or east when you parked your car?
A No, sir.
Q Ever hear of anybody that saw him before that came in there?
A No, sir.
Q Anything else you know about it in any way?
(315)

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A No, sir.
MR. SEARL: I think that is all, unless these men have some questions about it.

-----oooOOOooo-----

JOHN SNIVELEY,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q What is your first name Mr. Snively?
A John.
Q Where do you live?
A Mason.
Q How old a man are you?
A Nineteen.
Q You were with Mr. Curtis and Mr. Lang this morning in this truck, weren't you?
A Yes, sir.
Q And without going into detail about going down to Mr. Kehoe's house, you stopped there and then heard about this explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q You came up to the end of the road south of Bath and parked the truck?
A Yes, sir, left it there, and I was coming up to the schoolhouse.
Q Tell what you did, what order you came up in?
A I was walking up the center of the road when it happened.
Q Curtis was ahead of you?
A Yes, he was quite a little bit ahead of me.
Q Was Lang ahead of you?
A No, behind.
Q Did you hear him holler "Hot Rail?"
A Yes, sir.
(316)

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Q How far were you from the school when you heard him say that?
A I was about three rods from the car.
Q The car was behind you?
A Ahead of me, after it went by me.
Q The car was behind and south of you when he hollered?
A Yes. I was in the middle of the road, and I had to run to get out of the road.
Q Which side of the road did you go?
A To the right.
Q That would be the east side of the road?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see his car?
A Yes.
Q What kind of a car was it?
A Ford, with a box on the back.
Q Black box?
A Yes, sir.
Q What we call a Ford pickup?
A Yes, sir.
Q Light delivery truck?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you see a man in the car?
A Yes, I saw him in there.
Q Could you describe him in any way?
A No.
Q How fast was he going?
A Oh, I should judge he was going around 30 miles an hour when he went by me.
Q Where did this car go by you?
A Right up in front of the schoolhouse was the last I saw of it.
Q Did you see it swerve to the right among these parked cars?
A Yes.
Q Did you see the car slow down or stop?
(317)

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A No, the car didn't stop at all that I could see.
Q Where were you then, down in the ditch?
A No, still on the side of the road.
Q Did you see this car explode?
A Yes.
Q How far do you think you were from the car when it exploded?
A Oh, about two rods behind it I think, not any farther.
Q Did you see this man make any signal he was going to stop?
A All I saw was him stick his left hand out.
Q Out of the left-hand side?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you notice whether this car had curtains on it or not?
A No, I didn't.
Q When you seen him stick that hand out, was that when the explosion occuerred?
A Yes, I just saw him stick this hand out and then it went.
Q What did you see when this went off?
A Just the flame and the noise.
Q Heard a loud explosion?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did it knock you down?
A It knocked me down and dirt and stuff flew in my face and I couldn't see for a while.
Q Did you see any other men around there before that?
A 1 saw Jess and some other people standing on the sidewalk. Jess was running when the car blew up.
Q Did you see him after that?
A I seen him when he fell down, and that was the last thing I saw of him.
Q What did you do after the second explosion?
A I went back down to the truck, amd drove it out of the road down by the gasoline station.
(318)

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Q To the one by the corner?
A Just down to the road that goes to Park Lake.
Q Did you meet Jess there then?
A No, Jess wasn't there.
Q You are positive that this car didn't stop before it exploded?
A I don't see how it could hardly stop before the explosion the way it was going.
Q And you are quite sure the car that passed you was the one that exploded?
A Yes, I am pretty sure it was.
Q And that was around, somewheres around ten o'clock in the morning?
A Yes, it must have been around ten o'clock.
Q Do you know anything else about it that I haven't asked you about?
A No.
MR. SEARL: Do you men want to ask him any questions?
A JUROR: How far down the road were you when you first saw the car comimg from the South, the truck?
A When I first saw it I was down to that road that turns to the right when you come straight up this way, it turns to the right. I was just up this side of that a ways.
A JUROR: That would be a block south of the schoolhouse?
A I should imagine.
A JUROR: The first road to the south?
A It was the one that kind of goes into that allry, goes off the road that way.
Q Which way, to the east or west?
A To the right.
Q It would be your right as you were coming north?
A Yes.
MR. SEARL: It would be going off to the east then.
A JUROR: That would be something like a block or half block in there.
Q You didn't see at any time which way that car came onto the road, whether from the east or west?
(319)

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A No, I didn't see it until Lee hollered at me.
MR. SEARL: That is all I guess. Gentlemen, T don't think we have any other witness unless somebody in the room knows anything about this. I have a list of the dead and injured, with quite a complete history regarding the death, and parents and so on, except ten, and those then will be over here inside of an hour. Then we have Lieutenant Morse of the State Police, who telephoned this noon he would be here about 2:30. I will read this list, or file it with the Reporter. It don't seem that it would be hardly necessary to read it now.
A JUROR: It don't seem like it would be necessary.
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----

FORDNEY CUSHMAN,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q How old are you Fordney?
A Fifteen.
Q And you go to school up here?
A Yes, sir.
Q What grade are you in?
A I will be in the 10th next year.
Q Were you in the school building when it exploded?
A Yes, sir.
Q Were you around the school building the night before?
A Yes, sir.
Q About what time?
A If I should guess at it, about 8:30 Eastern Standard Time.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe?
A Very well.
(320)

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Q Did you see him the night before the schoolhouse blew up?
A On the sidewalk.
Q Whereabouts?
A About half ways between the schoolhouse and the front walk.
Q What was he doing?
A I think he was standing.
Q Where were you going when you passed him?
A Going from the school out to the road.
Q And you passed him on the walk?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was anybody with him?
A No.
Q Did you speak to him?
A No.
Q Did he speak to you?
A No.
Q Did you see him in the face?
A Yes.
Q So you are sure it was him?
A Yes, I could tell him very plain, and I knew him very well, and he had gold teeth in front.
Q Did you stay around there any more after that?
A I was around there all night.
Q Did you see him go in the building at all?
A No. I never seen him after I saw him on the sidewalk.
Q You don't know anything about his whereabouts after that or before?
A No, I don't know nothing.
Q Did you see his car that night?
A I didn't see his car, I just seen him.
Q Do you know anything about this explosion, anything more?
A Nothing more, only what I have heard.
Q Where were you when the schoolhouse blew up?
A I don't know when that blew up exactly, but I was on top of Hart's
(321)

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fighting fire. I didn't hear the explosion at schoolhouse.
Q That would Dave Hart's farm?
A Yes.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you men have some questions.

-----oooOOOooo-----

CHARLES H. RAWSON,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Mr. Rawson, where do you live?
A I live half mile east and half mile north of the east church of Bath.
Q How far would that be from the Village of Bath?
A The church right here in the Village.
Q The church is in the Village, but you are out a little bit?
A I am out about one mile.
Q How old are you?
A Born October 1888.
Q And have you always lived around Bath here?
A No, sir.
Q How long have you lived here?
A About nine years.
Q Did you know Andrew Kehoe?
A Yes, sir.
Q Know him real well?
A Not real well, but I have met him around the town here a good many times.
Q On this 18th of May when the schoolhouse blew up, where were you?
A I was on the railroad about 40 rods from the church when the schoolhouse blew up.
Q Were you working on the railroad?
(322)

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A Was on the way to the first explosions that was heard.
Q Did you hear any explosion before you heard this explosion at the school?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were you then?
A I was building fence on Willard White's.
Q Where did that explosion come from?
A I thought from the sound, it was the oil barrels in our oil storage alongside the railroad.
Q You started for the Village?
A Started as fast as I could.
Q Did you see lots of fire and smoke?
A I could ee lots of smoke. It looked like burning oil.
Q Did you go out to Kehoe's?
A No, sir.
Q Why didn't you?
A After I was down here about 40 rods from the church, I saw the roof go up in the air.
Q How did it go?
A Up in the air about ten feet and then dropped.
Q Would that be the entire roof of this north wing?
A Yes, the whole roof of the wing that was torn down.
Q Did you see one side go down before the other?
A It looked at if it was picked up and dropped again.
Q Are you sure the roof went up in the air?
A Yes.
Q You are not mistaken?
A I am not mistaken. This end raised up to the belfrey at the north end, raised up and went down.
Q What did you do then?
A I kind of changed my course. I said, "The schoolhouse is gone," to the fellow that was with me.
Q Who was with you?
(323)

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A Sanford Sweet.
Q Where does he live?
A The next north of me on the same side of the road.
Q Did you both come to the schoolhouse?
A We both come to the schoolhouse, but I don't know who got here first.
Q Did you assist there in the wreckage?
A Yes, sir.
Q Helping get these children out?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you hear another explosion there?
A Yes, I saw it.
Q Did you see Mr. Huyck?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where?
A Standing on the running board of Kehoe's car.
Q Where was you then?
A Right on hospital knoll.
Q That hill where they carried out these dead children?
A Yes, sir.
Q Was there some crowd there?
A No.
Q There were a few there then?
A I didn't see anybody.
Q There was some up in the school-yard?
A No, sir.
Q None at all?
A No. sir.
Q Had you seen anybody carrying children up to Mrs. Smith's house?
A No, sir.
Q Did you see anybody with a telophone pole working around there?
A After the second explosion?
Q After the second explosion.
(324)

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A Yes, sir.
Q Was anybody there except you and Sanford Sweet?
A I hadn't seen Sanford Sweet. Sanford Sweet and I parted on the corners right to the east of the road over here.
Q You think you were the only one on the schoolhouse grounds?
A The only ones I could see except the ones out where Mr. Huyck was.
Q Who did you see out there?
A One was Glenn Smith.
Q Who else?
A Mr. Huyck and Mr. Kehoe.
Q Anybody else?
A That was all.
Q Did you see Mr. McFarren?
A I didn't see Mr. McFarren until he was dead.
Q Did you see any boys out around there?
A No, sir.
Q Did you sse any children out around the school in back?
A No, sir. I met the children down here a block and a half from the schoolhouse.
Q Did you see any ladders up against the schoolhouse?
A No, sir.
Q Did somebody come with ladders afterwards?
A I wasn't looking for ladders I don't suppose.
Q You don't remember seeing them?
A No.
Q You saw Mr. Huyck on the fender of Kehoe's car?
A I saw Mr. Huyck get onto the fender of Kehoe's car.
4 You knew the kind of car Kehoe drove?
A No, sir.
Q What kind of car did you see there?
A Ford, from where I was it looked like a roadster.
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Q Do you know the make of the car?
A Ford. It looked like a Ford Roadster. What I could see of it, looked like a Ford Roadster, or light truck.
Q Did you see this truck body on the back?
A No, sir.
Q When you saw Mr. Huyck and Mr, Kehoe there, were they having some conversation or some talk?
A I couldn't hear any talk because I was two-thirds of the way across the school-yard.
Q Were they struggling?
A Mr. Kehoe had a gun.
Q What kind of a gun?
A It was far enough away so I couldn't tell whether a Winchester or rifle.
Q Was it a rifle?
A I couldn't tell, but I saw it was a gun, and Mr. Huyck had hold of this gun trying to get it from Mr. Kehoe.
Q Did both of them have hands on the gun?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where were Huyck's?
A Between Kehoe's hands.
Q Where was Kehoe's hands?
A Pretty close to the muzzle and one at the trigger.
Q Where was Kehoe facing?
A Facing the back of the car.
Q Was there a curtain on the car?
A I couldn't tell.
Q Where was the muzzle pointed?
A Outward.
Q Towards the back seat?
A Right towards the back of the seat.
Q Right towards the back of the front seat? There is only one seat in the car?
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A Yes.
Q And Huyck was standing on the running board on your side of the car?
A On my side of the car.
Q Which way was the car facing?
A North.
Q How long did they struggle there over that gun?
A It wasn't long enough to mention. It was all done like that.
Q Then what occurred?
A The whole car went up, and the men went in every direction.
Q Do you know whether the gun was discharged first?
A I don't know whether the gun was discharged at all or not, because the two reports came together so close I don't know whether there was two reports or one.
Q You did hear a big explosion?
A I heard a big explosion, and seen the fire from it.
Q What did you do then?
A I went to where Mr. Smith was laying to the side of the rest.
Q Did you have any talk with him?
A Just spoke with him. I saw it was Mr. Smith, and he said, "Help the rest, I ain't hurt much."
Q Was anybody else around there at that time?
A His wife.
Q Where did she come from?
A I don't know where she came from, or how she got there.
Q At that time there wasn't anybody working around the schoolhouse getting the children out?
A There might have been somebody at the schoolhouse by the time she was over. I when I got back from Mr. Smith there was a dozen there.
Q When you first saw the men struggling around the car, there was nobody around the schoolhouse?
A Now, I couldn't say. If there was anybody there they was in front of the schoolhouse from me.
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Q Did you go around in front of the schoolhouse?
A I went across the hill.
Q If anybody had been around in front you would have seen them?
A I surely would have.
Q And you would have seen them in the back of the schoolhouse?
A I would have if they had been there, but if they was on the other side of the engine house, I wouldn't have seen them back of it.
Q On the northeast side?
A I would have seen them if they had been on the northeast side.
Q How long after you started up the track here before this last explosion?
A I couldn't tell you no more than from the distance I came.
Q How long do you think it was between the time you saw the roof go up in the air that you heard this last explosion?
A About ten or fifteen minutes.
Q When Kehoe was in this car was he standing up?
A On his knees.
Q On his knees. Whereabouts on his knees?
A Back against the steering wheel.
Q And where were his knees, on the floor?
A In the seat.
Q In the seat. And Huyck was on the fender?
A On the running board.
Q And was his body inside the car at all?
A No, sir, just his head.
Q Just his head and his arms?
A His head. His arms were after the gun, had hold of the gun.
Q The car had a top on it?
A Had a top on it. Looked like a roadster top.
Q Was there room enough in there for Kehoe to kneel down in that seat?
A He seemed to be there in that shape.
Q And the rifle there?
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A I couldn't tell whether it was a rifle or shotgun, or what it was. It was a gun, I could see a gun shape to it.
Q You couldn't be mistaken about these things could you.
A No, sir.
Q You are sure of what you saw at that time?
A That is what I saw.
Q You are satisfied that at the time Mr. Huyck was killed there was nobody around there but you that saw it?
A Mr. Smith.
Q Glenn Smith, but nobody else working around the schoolhouse, or no other men around there?
A I didn't see any of them.
MR. SEARL: That is all, unless you men have some questions. That is all.
          (Recess)

-----oooOOOooo-----

LIEUTENANT LYLE W. MORSE,
a witness produced, sworn and examined, testified
as follows:
(Examined by Mr. Searl)
Q Your full name is Lyle Morse?
A Lyle W.
Q You hold a position with the State?
A Assistant Chief of the Secret Service Division.
Q On Wednesday the 18th of May were you called to Bath?
A Yes, sir.
Q About what time did you get here?
A, Sometime after ten o'clock, I couldn't tell just exactly what time it was. I imagine in the neighborhood of 10:20.
Q When you came here, who came with you, if anyone?
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A Mr. Watkins.
Q Of your Department?
A Yes, sir.
Q And have you made an investigation since your arrival in Bath as to the cause of the disaster at Bath and Mr. Kehoe's home?
A Yes, sir.
Q And have you been in charge of that investigation?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, can you give in detail to the Jury the substance of what you found, and your conclusions?
A Upon my arrival here in Bath they had taken out a few of the bodies, and the first move that I made when I had -- I went around the school building to try and locate the janitor. Our impression was by the telephone call that the boiler had blown up; and I learned from some bystanders over there that the boiler had not blown up, and they had come to the conclusion that it was an explosion; and I went over to Mr. Smith's -- I don't know his first name.
Q Frank Smith, the Janitor.
A -- Frank Smith's residence, and his wife informed me that he had taken Mr. Kehoe's Operator's License and bank book from his clothing, and that it was then in the possession of the Sheriff; and while I was talking with Mrs. Smith the Express Agent came up there and wanted to know if they had come to any decision as to who was guilty of the explosion over there, placing the dynamite over there. Of course, at that time we didn't know there was dymmite used. I told him from the preliminary investigation that we had made, pointed towards Mr. Kehoe; and then he explained to me the circumstances connected with the billing out of a box to a Mr. Smith in Lansing; and Mr. Lane of the Fire Marshall's Division said that he would call Mr. Smith at Lansing, and as I remember, I don't think he got in touch with him. But later on that day we found that this box had went to Laingsburg; and that was about all of the investigating we done up to the time they found the dynamite in the building, any more then I talked with
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several people, and the statements from these people would point towards Mr. Kehoe.
Q Now, there did come a time that morning along about an hour or so after you came here that somebody said there was dynamite in the building?
A Yes, sir.
Q And did you make an investigation?
A Yes, sir.
Q What did you find?
A The first discovery made was where the ceiling had been blown off the basement room. It was a coal room I think. A good quantity of this stick dynamite, or pyrotol it was, had fallen down with this ceiling. It was lathed and plastered.
Q Does it show where this basement was?
          (Paper marked Exhibit 11)
A This is the first floor plan. This dynamite laid on the basement floor. We, of course, have to figure this as the basement. Here is the basement, if I am not mistaken, comes to this point here. Is that right, does any of you gentlemen know with regard to that point?
MR. SEARL: I would say so, from what examination I made of the school.
A Here is the stairway, and that basement runs from here up to this point, and I think your furnace sets in this point right in here.
MR. HARRINGTON: You are mistaken -- right in here. This is the coal room.
A What is this, the fan room?
MR. HARRINGTON: No. This just a little storeroom.
A This is the front of the building?
MR. HARRINGTON: Yes, The fan room comes off this room here. You go down here and come into this room here. You come down here, right down here, and then turn and go into this room here, in this little room here.
MR. SEARL: That is the well house?
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MR. HARRINGTON: That is the well. Right in here is the water pressure tank. Now, there is a partion through here.
A There is a coal room in here. What is this over here?
MR. HARRINGTON: Just a little storeroom.
A Right in here on the basement floor is where the dynamite laid. Now, 24 feet from whis wall, that would be the west wall of the basement, and measuring from that little 18 or 20 inch square entrance here that you went up into this sub-basement, 24 feet from there right straight out where this dynamite was shoved from this point through that 2-inch tin pipe.
Q Can you explain just how that was put there?
A That 2-inch tin pipe was a plain tin with a joint in it not soldered, and they were about 10 or 12 feet long, and they were bolted together with a little stove bolt.
Q Like conductor pipe in an eave trough?
A Yes. And from the way it looked, it looked as if he would shove in as many sticks as he could in this, of course up in this sub-basement or in this shallow basement under the building, and then he would take that jointed well rod and shove it down through. And that covered a space of about seven feet up in between the joists. That would be in the ceiling of this room over here in the cellar.
Q That would be in the furnace room?
A Yes, in the furnace room.
Q And the ceiling of the basement had a wire lath and plaster?
A Metal lath and plastered, and that lay up in top of this lath and plaster.
Q It was entirely concealed there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And that pipe was put right along through there parallel with the joists?
A That was put up between the metal lath and the floor of the first floor.
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Q Then did you find a wire connected with that?
A There was a wire connected with a dynamite cap, and this wire connected with a wire that ran along and was connected with the four plants that were under this part. Now, these wires, I know myself, run from this corner ---
Q Now that would be?
A That would be the northeast corner of this sub-basement.
Q The south wing of the new part?
A Yes. -- down to the center. That would be the center of the building, center of that new wing, to an 8 x 8 or 10 x 10 timber that ran through there, that was on top of cement, cement pillars, that held the center of this portion of the building, and that ran through the center of the building the full length of it; that is, underneath the first floor. And this wire run -- I don't know whether you call this the back side or the front side.
Q It would be the side nearest the main street?
A That is right. That wire run down, and those staples were about three or four feet apart.
Q That wire was stapled into that timber running through there?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you notice whether the staples were rusty?
A Yes.
Q Would you say they had been hit with a hammer since they had been in there?
A That would be hard to say. My impression would be that those staples had been in there for some time.
Q And that they had rusted since they had been in there?
A Yes, sir.
Q That wire run clear down through the end of the building?
A Down to the last sticks of dynamite.
Q Was that wire connected with some dynamite?
A Connected with four charges, two sacks each.
Q Where did they lay?
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A By the large timber, and with the explosion of the ones farthest to the north, in each case there were two sacks up on top of this large timber. In this one the sack laid down on the dirt.
Q Was that connected with the wire at all?
A No, it wasn't connected at all. That basement in there varied from two foot, two foot and a half, to some places probably four or five feet. The ground under there you know is rough. And in the other three, two sacks were in each place, and a dynamite cap placed in only one sack.
Q You mean three tiers of sacks?
A Yes, three other places, and they were divided about equal, quarter way, different charges that were put in this part of the building. Now, in this -- out here in this coal room someone had cut this wire. I got the dynamite cap out of this charge that was put out in the coal room, but I don't know who cut the wire. I don't know who took the wire out in fact. I didn't cut this. In fact, I didn't see this wire in the charge in the coal room.
Q Was there a charge put in the sub-basement?
A It was the same, but it was shoved through. I think there is a wall along about here, and that was shoved out about ten or twelve feet.
Q That was also concealed above the plaster and below the floor?
A It was before the explosion, the two pipes were still hanging up there between these joists after this explosion after we had found this dynamite.
Q There was some dynamite that had fell on the floor in the coal room?
A It all fell on the floor.
Q How much did you find in there, do you know?
A Well, I couldn't tell you exactly how much was found there. Now, Mr. Dibbel, who is a Captain of the Lansing Fire Department, and the Assistant Chief, I talked with both of them and they told me not to their knowledge was any stick dynamite or pyrotol, either one, found
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out in the exploded part of the building. Now, if that is true, in this coal room there were 303 sticks of pyrotol that laid down on the floor, because in the other -- out in the furnace room, the only thing that was taken out of there was this 40% Hercules, and there were 208 Sticks of that. I say there was 208, if the four that were brought down by someone from the house -- I saw those, I don't know whether they were put in there or not; and if they were there was only 204 sticks taken out of this furnace room.
Q How many sacks of dynamite were taken out of the building?
A The Assistant Chief of the Lansing Fire Department and Captain Dibbel told me that two of the sacks were found right over here, next to this wall.
Q That would be --
A That would be right next to this corner that stood.
Q Still standing after the explosion?
A That would be the northeast corner.
Q Of the new part?
A Of the new part. Two sacks we found there, and one had a dynamite cap attached.
Q Were they connected with wires?
A They didn't remember seeing any wires there, but they did tell me they had seen a small wire running up through this part, and some down here near where the hot-shot battery and clock were found.
Q That would be up near the south end of the north wing of the new part?
A That is right.
Q Now, did you find any other dynamite in there except what we have talked about?
A No other, no.
Q You did find a hot-shot battery and clock?
A Yes, sir.
Q And the wires from these charges all ran to those?
A I couldn't say as to that. Mr. Dibbel and the Assistant Chief, Lefke I think his name is, told me he remembered those wires down
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there, and that during the time they were tearing down it is possible they were pulled off away from there, and that they didn't pay any particular attention to it, and hadn't thought of it until I told them to watch for it; but he says he knew there was wires lying in that dirt.
Q How many hot-shot batteries did you find there?
A Two.
Q What is that?
A Four dry cells, two in a tin covering.
Q All put in one tin covering?
A Yes, sir, there were two of those.
Q Did you find the remains of a clock?
A Yes, sir.
Q Where did you find that?
A Right with the hot-shot battery.
Q Was it under the floor?
A If you remember, the entrance here to the building over here, I don't know just the width of that, but that is built right onto the ground, and you will find there is a drop there of two or three feet; now down to the dirt, just like a sidewalk, that runs in there, and I think there is five steps up to the level of your floors. Right down in there, after they had shoveled this brick amd wreckage out of there about 12 or 13 feet from the front entrance was found these two hot-shot batteries and this clock.
Q And that could be entered from this little hole 18 x 18, going into the sub-basement, couldn't it?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, for the purpose of the record, I show you Exhibit 12, and ask you if that is a picture of the clock that you found there?
A Yes, sir.
Q And here is Exhibit 13, that is a picture of the dynamite caps you found unexploded in the school building?
A Yes, sir, and these charges account for all eight of those. There
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was one here with a dynamite cap in.
Q For the purpose of the record will you please denote the place in the school building?
A That was in the northeast corner of the new part of the building; and the charge in the coal room, that was found on the basement floor.
Q Go right ahead?
A And the charge in the furnace room, that was concealed in the ceiling of the furnace room, and the four charges in the south wing of the new portion of this building. That is the eight charges that weren't discharged.
Q I show you Exhibit 14, that shows a picture, does it not, of the two hot-shot batteries, and some of the material that was taken out of the school building?
A Yes.
Q Shows a spark plug connected to a bottle?
A Somebody took that out of the chicken coop as I understand it. The two dynamite cap the two hot-shot batteries and the clock, and a portion of this wiring all came out of the schoolhouse.
Q Have you got some pictures that show the dynamite that was taken out of the schoolhouse? There is nothing left of the clock, so you could tell what time it had been set to go off?
A No. The only thing, we could tell that it wasan alarm clock, was because there was a round nickled piece like there is on the back of an alarm clock. We examined the large clocks in the school rooms there, and we find that none of those contained such a piece as that, and from information from different ones around the school building we were told that there were no other clocks in the building except large clocks that hung on the wall.
Q Now, I show you Exhibit 15, which appears to be a picture, and you can explain what that is?
A This is a close-up view of the alarm clock, with a portion of the pyrotol in the background.
Q And then here is Exhibit 16?
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A That is a closeup view of a sack of pyrotol that was broken open, with the stick pyrotol in the background.
Q The pyrotol in the sack was in powder form and not in stick form?
A Yes, in bulk.
Q And that was true of all the sacks?
A Yes, sir, in bulk.
Q How much does those sacks weigh?
A Approximately 30 pounds each.
Q Exhibit 17?
A That shows the stick pyrotol, and the Hercules 40% the box, and the bulk pyrotol that was in the sack.
Q How much dynamite and pyrotol was taken out of the school building?
A There was 303 sticks of pyrotol, and there was either 204 or 208 sticks of 40% Hercules, and ten sacks that went approximately 30 lbs. to the sack of bulk pyrotol.
Q Do you know how much the whole amount weighed, how many pounds?
A There would be about 100 lbs. of Pyrotol -- of stick pyrotol; and there would be about 104 pounds of 40% Hercules; and there would be 300 lbs. of bulk pyrotol; making in all about 504 pounds.
Q Can you explain the difference between Hercules and Pyrotol, whether they are dynamite, or what they are?
A As I understand it -- I am no authority on that, but Mr. Trombla of the Interstate Commerce Commission, he tells me that the pyrotol in comparison with dynamite is equal to about a 20% dynamite.
Q Then the Hercules 40% is a dynamite of 40%?
A Yes, sir.
Q And this pyrotol that you found in the sacks was the same grade as stick form?
A Yes, sir.
Q Did you make an examination of the stick form as to its age or as to how long it had been in the building?
A Mr. Trombla said it would be impossible to tell that. The fact that that had been punched through on top of the plaster, and in the
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other room where it fell down in the coal room and got all covered with coal dust, it would be impossible to tell.
Q All this dyamite was taken to the Michigan State college?
A Yes, sir.
Q This box that the Express Agent told you about was shipped out, was also taken to Lansing and examined?
A Mr. Watkins and myself went to Laingsburg. We took the box to the State Police at East Lansing, and we left it out in the yard, and Mr. Trombla and myself opened the box the next morning, and discovered that the box contained a check book and other things that pertains to his office as Secretary of the School Board.
Q And you found a letter written by him to this man Smith?
A Yes, sir.
Q No dynamite in that box?
A No, sir.
Q Now, does that take in all the dynamite in the building, and the disposal of it, and everything you found in the building, and the wiring and things?
A I think it does.
Q Did you make an examination of Mr. Kehoe's premises that day?
A If went down there about -- I think it was about 4:00 o'clock or 4:30. At that time we were talking about going down to see if we wouldn't be able to shovel out the basement of the house to try to locate the body of Mrs. Kehoe; and one of khe firemen had gone down there, and I asked him if there would be any use to try it, and he said he didn't think so. So I went on to Lansing, and made an effort to locate Mrs. Kehoe at the hospital and through relatives; and I called Mrs. C. C. Mack and she informed me that Mrs. Kehoe's sisters -- I think the Price Sisters -- had gone to Jackson to try and locate Mrs. Kehoe; and I called Jackson -- I think it was a Mrs. Foster, that lives on East Michigan Avenue in Jackson -- and she told me that the Price sisters hadn't been there, but she had heard
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that they were coming, and I left word there for the Price sisters to call Lansing and let us know whatever they found out if they located her, and they later called back to Mrs. Mack and said they hadn't located her, and they were quite positive she out to the farm. So Mrs. Mack called me and told me they were unable to locate her. I came back out here that night, and I guess I met you and told you that we had taken the box down to Lansing.
Q Then, that day when you were around Kehoe's did you mako examination for wiring around there, did you find some wire and things?
A No. I spent very little time at the Kehoe farm.
Q For the purpose of this Inquest, you did learn that the buildings had been wired together there?
A Yes. Mr. Watkins, the man that came out with me, I sent him out there with Mr. Lane of the Fire Marshall's Department, and he came back and he told me that they had found wire running between all of the buildings, and that they were satisfied that the buildings were burned; that is, touched off by those wires.
Q I show you Exhibits 18 and 19, and ask you if you can identify those, and explain what those are?
A That is an arrangement that I received from the Lansing Police Department, and somebody, so they informed me, had taken those out of the chicken coop and brought it in to the Lansing Police Department.
Q Can you explain how this worked, the theory of it? You have tried to see whether it worked or not?
A I tried with kerosene. I don't know what they had in there, whether kerosene or what.By turning that bottle up into that can top a small quantity of gas or whatever liquid they used would run down into this can top, and there was a wick from out of this can top over in close touch with the spark plug or contact point where the spark would be generated when connected up with a battery, and by touching a button, or by connecting this with a battery it would spark, and it would make this wick, and I presume heat the bottle or burn the tape in two, and it might explode. In any event it would
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start a fire.
Q On the other side there was a coil also attached as shown in here?
A Yes. There was a coil, and someone told me, a man that claimed to have worked with the Fairbanks Gas Engine Company, that this coil was just such a coil as was used on a Fairbanks-Morse gas engine.
Q And this coil had been wired up in turn with these different wires that run around to these different buildings?
A Yes.
Q Your deduction is that one of these instruments was in each building, and set fire to each building.
A I couldn't say, but my opinion is that was the apparatus he used.
Q There was straw found piled over this instrument and around it?
A As I understand it, it was.
Q In your experiment with it, when it was connected with a storage battery the wick would ignite and start the fire, wouldn't it?
A Yes, sir.
Q Now, did you notice the trees out at Mr. Kehoe's house, how they had been girdled?
A Yes, sir.
Q How many trees did you see that way?
A Just several around the yard.
Q Small trees?
A Small trees, yes sir.
Q The bark had been sawed and stripped?
A I don't know how it was cut. It was perhaps 1-1/2 inches in width, and perhaps two or three inches from the ground.
Q You saw Mrs. Kehoe's body there the next day?
A No, sir.
Q You weren't there?
A No.
Q Have you got any other pictures here that will explain this thing any way?
A No, I think that is all we have, only that Mr. Lane made for us a
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diagram of this.
Q Diagram of the building?
A Yes.
Q We will mark this Exhibit 20, and this Exhibit 20 is a drawing of the buildings as drawn to scale, as it shows the relative position of the buildings. Mr. Lane had a diagram yesterday that was roughly drawn, and he gave the distances of the buildings?
A Yes, sir.
Q And this spot back here, what is that?
A That is where the body was found.
Q That is where Mrs. Kehoe's body was found. I think we will ask the Coroner if he will just introduce all these Exhibits that we have been talking about. What is this other blue print, does that have any relation to this?
A No, there is just two blue prints that they sent over from this architect that drew the plans of the building.
Q I see.
A I think you can keep those.
Q All right.
A If they are any good to you.
Q Do you know whether there are any window lights into this sub-basement on the front?
A No, there is no window lights.
Q None at all?
A No, sir.
Q It would be entirely dark, and the only way you could get in would be from these two holes from the regular basement?
A Yes, sir. I don't know whether you want this in there or not, but after we checked up on this to the College, of course they don't keep those caps with the dynamite, and I took them over to the East Lansing Headquarters and destroyed them, and I used a storage battery that was in a Reo Speed Wagon, and I hooked them all on at once, and when I hooked them on all at once I couldn't get them to discharge it.
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I could discharge one or two at a time, and I talked with two or three electrical men, and they were of the opinion that if two hot-shots was all that he had connected up with all of those charges that he had placed aroud the biulding, that his load was too heavy for the amount of juice that he had.
Q And that was the reason that it didn't all go off?
A Yes.
Q You found the joints in the wiring soldered didn't you?
A Part of them, yes sir.
Q And it was all completely wired up to the clock from all you could find?
A I couldn't say as to that. I know there was a wire from this corner down to the center of this, and the full length of this timber; and I know it was wired over here to the charge that was placed above the furnace room.
Q How, did you make some investigation as to where Mr. Kehoe purchased any of these dynamite caps?
A Yes, sir. I found that he had purchased from the Chapman Sporting Goods store at 114 East Michigan Avenue on November 18th or 19th, 1926, two boxes of 40% Hercules, and at various times he had been in the store and bought dynamite caps; and in the month of December, 1926, he bought a 30.06 Model 54 Winchester.
Q Rifle?
A Rifle, and 100 rounds of ammunition.
Q Can you think of anything else in connection with it?
A And he bought one hot-shot battery in the Gould-Spencer Auto & Radio Supply Store at 234 North Washington.
Q When did he buy that?
A He bought that about two weeks ago, and Mr. Spencer also told me that he sold Mr. Kehoe the tires that he had on his Ford car when it was blown up in the past few weeks.
Q Did you check the numbers on those tires?
A No.
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Q Just for the purpose of the record, you understand that the State Police Trooper was at the Kehoe home all during the night of Wednesday?
A That is what I understand, yes sir.
Q And they were around the building here that night?
A Yes, sir.
Q In charge here.
A I left here, I think, at 12:30, and I know there was a trooper out there at that time out to the farm.
Q This box that was sent to Mr. Smith had a number on it, didn't it?
A Yes, sir, 569.
Q And did you notice some markings on the box about dynamite or pyrotol?
A Yes, sir, pyrotol. This had been marked out with a black marking brush.
Q Did you trace this pyrotol by its number?
A We had the Agricultural Depextment trace that, and they wired Washington, and they received a wire from Washington that the shipment containing that number was shipped to R. E. Decker, Farm Bureau Agent, at Jackson, and it was shipped on October 2nd, 1925, and I called the State Police at Jackson and had them see Mr. Decker, and they called back and told me that he had said that his reports were made to a Mr. Livngston and that he had an office in courthouse at Marquette, and I got a list of the dymamite that was sold in severaL of the counties around here, Clinton County and six or seven of the surrounding counties, and that list went back to August 1925, but in this list I fail to find any place where Kehoe bought any dynamite.
Q It might be that he had bought it there, and his name not appear on the list?
A As I understand, the Farm Bureau Agents are required to make a list, keep a record of all the dynamite sold, and for what purpose. As I understand it, if, say the co-operative association, if there is one in this town, would go to Mr. Decker at Jackson and buy a thousand
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pounds of dynamite, they make a record of that and they report that to Mr. Livingston at Marquette and then the co-operative association can sell that out to anyone, they don't keep any record of it, they sell it like they would sugar.
Q You know the pyrotol went to Jackson?
A Yes, sir. That was the only order in Michigan that bore that number. It was shipped on October 2nd, and it was Order No. 610, from the Department of Agriculture in Washington.
Q I show you Exhibit 21, which is a picture of a siga "Criminals are made not born." Did you learn that was on his fence at the Kahoe home?
A Yes, sir.
Q Can you think of anything else in connection with this?
A I don't know of anything else.
Q In your opinion, do you think there was anyone else interested in this except Mr. Kehoe?
A No, I wouldn't.
Q There has been some discussion about it being too large a job for one man. If one man devoted enough time to it, he could do it?
A My opinion is that he had every opportunity in the work to spend lots of time on it. There would be nothing in the basement to show that anyone was doing anything there. There would be nothing visible around there. The only way you would discover anything there would be to crawl up in this shallow basement, and you would have to have a flashlight, because all the explosive was put up in under this shallow basemen.

Q And all the wiring?
A Yes.
Q There was nothing to show that?
A I talked with Mr. Smith, and he said on two or three occasions he had found the little door that went up into the shallow basement on the north wing -- he had found that out on the floor, but he said he
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didn't think anything of it; thought possibly that some of the students had went down there and took it out, out of curiosity, and seen there was nothing there and left it.
A JUROR: As I understand it, this dynamite -- this pipe run clear across the whole way?
MR SEARL: That would be from the furnace room.
A JUROR: A Yes, and the end was open through the joists under the blind basement. You would have to go up into this blind basement and shove it through?
A Yes, just like it was this room, and the joists were running across this side of the room, and in that side was a 24-inch square opening, and as you crawled up in there you could look full length. This pipe run parrallel with the joists, and he crowded this stick dynamite down through there. Of course, you understand that a lot of this testimony is heresay. What I mean, about these wires that run around through there.
MR. SEARL: We are doing this because Lieutenant Morse knows about it, and while this is a judicial proceeding, we are not sticking to legal evidence; it would require 15 or 20 more witnessee to tell you what he has told you.
A JUROR: All of that that was put in there has certainly been put in there since the building was put up?
MR. SEARL: You mean all this pyrotol?
A JUROR: No, the sticks that was shoved down the pipes. That couldn't have been put in there at the time the building was made?
A It probably could have.
A JUROR: Somebody said it was put in there --
A I might be able to tell you how that report got started. That was shoved through 24, 25, 26 feet back here, out in this room, and we cut a hole right up through this ceiling, and we were taking out some sticks of dynamite, and somebody looked in the window, and they said it must have been in there.
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Q The conclusion you would draw, if it had been put in when the building was built, there would be no necessity of this tin pipe, this conductor to get it down there?
A No.
MR. SEARL: As you go and look there, it would appear there would be no way to get in in there unless it was built in; but with this explanation of the conductor pipe, it shows how it was put in there.
A JUROR: You wouldn't have been able to get it down there without the conductor pipe?
A No.
MR SEARL: Gentlemen, we have no other witnesses here, and we expect to close the Inquest unless there is some other question you want answered, or unless you know of some other witnesses, or unless there are some other witnesses in the room that know about this. I think that is all then, Gentlemen. I think you can go down in the basement to deliberate on this.

-----oooOOOooo-----

          (The following is a list of the deaths caused by the explosion at the Bath Consolidated Scbool, Bath, Michigan, and the destruction of the buildings at the farm of Andrew P. Kehoe in Bath Township, Clinton County, Michigan, to which the above inquisition refers):

Bauerle, Arnold
Bergen, Herman
Burnett, Floyd
Clayton, Cleo
Cushman, Ralph A.
Foote, Katherine
Geisenhaver, Carlyle
Hall, Willa Marie
Bergen, Henry
Bromund, Amelia
Chapman, Russell
Cochran, Robert
Ewing, Earl
Fritz, Marjorie
Hall, George
Hart, Percy

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Hart, Vivian
Harte, Galen
Harte, Stanley William
Hunter, Loren
Johns, Doris
Kehoe, Mrs. Andrew
McFarren, Clarence
Nickols, Emma
Smith, Glenn
Shirts, Pauline
Witchell, Lucille
Zimmerman, George Orville
Witchell, Elizabeth
Harte, Mrs. Blanche
Harte, Lavere Robert
Hoeppner, Francis
Huyck, Emery
Kehoe, Andrew
McDonald, Thelma
McFarren, Nelson
Richardson, Richard
Robb, Elsie
Weatherby, Hazel
Woodman, Le Moyne
Zimmerman, Lloyd F.

-----oooOOOooo-----

          (The following is a copy of the findings of the Jury in the above inquisition):

INQUEST AS TO CAUSE OF DEATH.

STATE OF MICHIGAN,  )
                    )  SS.
County of Clinton   )

          An inquisition taken at Bath in said County, on the 19th, 23rd, 24th and 25th days of May, A. D. 1927, before me, C. E. Lamb, one of the Coroners of the said County, upon the view of the body of Emery E. Huyck, there lying dead, by the oaths of the Jurors whose names are hereto subscribed, who, being sworn to inquire in behalf of the people of this State, when, in what manner and by what means the said Emery E. Huck came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said Emery E. Huyck was murdered at the Village of Bath in said County of Clinton about 9:10 A. M., Central Standard Time, on May 18th, 1927, by Andrew P. Kehoe; that at or about the same time the said Andree P. Kehoe mmrdered several other persons hereinafter named; and committed suicide; and that the said deaths were caused in the following manner, to-wit:

          That in the month of October, 1925, said Kehoe purchased five hundred pounds of pyrotol at Jackson, Michigan, which he brought

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to and stored in his farm buildings in Bath Township; and on November 10th or 19th, 1926, he purchased two boxes of Hercules 40% dynamite in Lansing; and that thereafter, he being Treasurer of the Bath School, and having a key to the school building, and have free access to said building, he placed said pyrotol in 30-pound sacks, which were laid in pairs, under the new part of said school building; and that he concealed a large portion of stick pyrotol and Hercules dynamite between the basement ceiling and the first floor flooring; that he placed said pyrotol and dynamite therein by using an eave-trough conductor pipe, through which said dynamite and pyrotol were forced by certain long sticks, said conductor pipe running parallel with the joists of said flooring. That all of said dynamite and pyrotol was connected with electric wires, which in turn were connected with two hot-shot batteries, and also connected with an alarm clock concealed in the sub-basement of said building. That all of said pyrotol and dynamite, wiring, and other things in connection therewith were concealed within said building so that the same could not be found without a search therefor. That said material had been so concealed in said building for a time unknown to us.

          That the said Andrew Kehoe set said clock to explode said dynamite and pyrotol at about 8:45 A. M. on May 18th; and that at about 8:45 A. M. on said day. a portion of said pyrotol and dynamite did explode, causing the north wing of said school building to collapse during a time when school was in session, and the children hereinafter named were in said building. That the deaths of the children and teachers hereinafter set forth as having been caused by the collapse of said school building, resulted from a premeditated and deliberate plan laid by Andrew P. Kehoe. That 504 pounds of said pyrotol and dynamite concealed within said building did not explode, due to the batteries used not being sufficiently strong to set off all of said pyrotol and dynamite.

          That at sometime between the evening of May 16th, 1927, and 8:45 A. M. on May 18th, 1927, the said Andrew P. Kehoe murdered his wife, Nellie Kehoe, at their farm home located on Section 19 of Bath Township; and that he thereafter placed her body upon a hog chute located near his farm barns. That on May 18th at about 8:45 A. M. the said Andrew P. Kehoe deliberately set fire to all of the buildings upon his said farm except the poultry house; and that said buildings were ignited by means of an electric circuit connected with an electric coil, which in turn was connected with a common automobile spark plug, and an electric spark from which caused oil or gasoline to be ignited, and that said Nellie Kehoe's body was burned at the time said buildings burned.

          That the said Kehoe was at his said farm home at the time said fire started and said school building collapsed; and that he drove therefrom in his Ford delivery truck through the Village of Bath, circling the surrounding territory thereafter for about fifteen or twenty minutes, again entered the Village of Bath from the south at a high rate of speed, driving immediately to the west of said schoolhouse and in the highway, where he caused his said Ford deliverv truck to be blown up by the usage of explosives; and that at said time, which was about 9:10 A. M. he deliberately and by the means of said explosion in his said car where he then sat, causel the death of Emery E. Huyck, Glenn 0. Smith, and Nelson McFarren, who were standing near his said car; and that the said Andrew P. Kehoe then and there committed suicide, he being killed by said explosion.

          We find that the said Andrew P. Kehoe was sane at all times, and so conducted himself and concealed his operations that there was no cause to suspicion any of the above acts; and we further find, that

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the School Board, and Frank Smith, Janitor of said school building, were not negligent in and about their duties, and were not guilty of any negligence in not discovering said plan.

          That attached hereto, and forming a part of this finding, is a list of the persons whose deaths were caused by said acts.

          IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the said Coroner and the Jurors of this inquest, have hereunto set their hands the 25th day of May, A. D. 1927.

(Signed)   C. E. Lamb, Coroner.

Edward Drumheller,
Ishmell Everett,
Burt Wilcox,
Wilmer Coleman,
Clarence Tolman,
Alton Church,
          
Jurors.



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Findings
of the May 23-25, 1927
Clinton County, Michigan Coroner's Inquest

into the circumstances surrounding the death of the Bath School Superintendent, Emory Eli Huyck, on May 18, 1927 in the Village of Bath, Michigan.
C.E. Lamb, Clinton County Coroner



 
INQUEST AS TO CAUSE OF DEATH.


STATE OF MICHIGAN,  )
                    )  SS.
County of Clinton   )


          An inquisition taken at Bath in said county, on the 19th, 23rd, 24th, and 25th days of May, A. D. 1927, before me C. B. Lamb, one of the Coroners of the said county, upon the view of the body of Emery E. Huyck, there lying dead, by the oaths of the jurors whose names are hereto subscribed, who, being sworn to inquire in behalf of the people of this state, when, in what manner and by what means the said Emery E. Huyck came to his death, upon their oaths do say that the said Emery E. Huyck was murdered at the Village of Bath in said county of Clinton about 9:10 A. M. Central Standard Time, on May 18th, 1927, by Andrew P. Kehoe; that at or about the same time the said Andrew P. Kehoe murdered several other persons hereinafter named, and committed suicide; and that the said deaths were caused in the following manner, to-wit:

          That in the month of October, 1925, said Kehoe purchased five hundred pounds of pyrotol at Jackson, Michigan, which he brought to and stored in his farm buildings in Bath Township; and on November 18th or 19th, 1926, he purchased two boxes of Hercules 40% dynamite in Lansing; and that thereafter, he being Treasurer of the Bath School and having a key to the school building, and having free access to said building, he placed said pyrotol in 30-pound sacks, which were laid in pairs, under the new part of said school building; and that he concealed a large portion of stick pyrotol and Hercules dynamite between the basement ceiling and the first floor flooring; that he placed said pyrotol and dynamite therein by using an eave-trough conductor pipe, through which said dynamite and pyrotol were forced by certain long sticks, said conductor pipe running parallel with the joists of said flooring. That all of said dynamite and pyrotol was connected with electric wires, which in turn were connected with two hot-shot batteries, and also connected with an alarm clock concealed in the sub-basement of said building. That all of the said pyrotol and dynamite, wiring, and other things in connection therewith were concealed within said building so that the same could not be found without a search therefor. That said material had been so concealed in said building for a time unknown to us.

          That the said Andrew Kehoe set said clock to explode said dynamite and pyrotol at about 8:45 A. M. on May 18th; and that at about 8:45 A. M. on said day a portion of said pyrotol and dynamite did explode, causing the north wing of said school building to collapse during a time when school was in session, and the children hereinafter named were in said building. that the deaths of the children and teachers hereinafter set forth as having been caused by the collapse of said school building, resulted from a premeditated and deliberate plan laid by Andrew P. Kehoe. That 504 pounds of said pyrotol and dynamite concealed within said building did not explode, due to the batteries used not being sufficiently strong to set off all of said pyrotol and

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dynamite.

          That at sometime between the evening of May 16th, 1927, and 8:45 A. M. on May 18th, 1927, the said Andrew P. Kehoe murdered his wife, Nellie Kehoe, at their farm home located on Section 19 of Bath Township; and that he thereafter placed her body upon a hog chute located near his farm barns. That on May 18th, at about 8:45 A. M. the said Andrew P. Kehoe deliberately set fire to all of the buildings upon his said farm except the poultry house; and that said buildings were ignited by means of an electric circuit connected with an electric coil, which in turn was connected with a common automobile spark plug, and an electric spark from which caused oil or gasoline to be ignited, and that said Nellie Kehoe's body was burned at the time said buildings burned.

          That the said Kehoe was at his said farm home at the time said fire started and said school building collapsed; and that he drove therefrom in his Ford delivery truck through the Village of Bath, Circling the surrounding territory thereafter for about fifteen or twenty minutes, again entered the Village of Bath from the south at a high rate of speed, driving immediately to the west of said schoolhouse and in the highway, where he caused his said Ford delivery truck to be blown up by the use of explosives; and that at said time which was about 9:10 A. M., he deliberately and by the means of said explosion in his said car where he then sat, he caused the death of Emery E. Huyck, Glenn O. Smith, and Nelson McFarren, who were standing near his said car; and that the said Andrew P. Kehoe then and there committed suicide, he being killed by said explosion.

          We find that the said Andrew P. Kehoe was sane at all times, and so conducted himself and concealed his operations that there was no cause to suspicion any of the above acts; and we further find, that the School Board, and Frank Smith, Janitor of said school building, were not negligent in and about their duties, and were not guilty of any negligence in not discovering said plan.

          That attached hereto, and forming a part of this finding, is a list of the persons whose deaths were caused by said acts.

          IN TESTIMONY WHEREOF, the said Coroner and the jurors of this inquest, have hereunto set their hands the 25th day of May, A. D. 1927.
Scan of the Inquest Jury signatures
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Our thanks go out to Gene Wilkins for sharing his copy of the Inquest Transcript with me,
to Jill Maxwell for providing us with the pages missing from Gene's copy
and to Ron Bauerle for looking over the pages for errors & suggestioning alternative layout schemes.
Document Digitization and HTML formatting ©Copyright 2006 & 2009 James L. Daggy




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Glossary of terms found in the transcript
Rod
A unit of distance, equal to 5½ yards «or» 16½ feet «or» 5.029 meters

Pyrotol
An incendiary explosive made from reprocessed World War I military surplus cordite & smokeless powder. It was often used in conjunction with dynamite and was readily available for agricultural uses such as stump clearing. It had previously been known as sodatol.





Inquest Exhibits
 
 

Letter from Andrew Kehoe to Clyde B. Smith announcing his resignation from the Bath School Board; enclosed with the board's financial documents.

It was shipped from Bath by railway express early on the Morning of May 18, 1927. The shipment was made in a box that had been marked "Pyrotol."

Letter from Andrew Kehoe to Clyde B. Smith